Law School Discussion

How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?

LadyKD

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Re: How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?
« Reply #40 on: November 11, 2006, 06:27:51 AM »
I want to practice public interest law. ie...work for the DA's office or the Attorney General's office. Public Service no money, no glam, but then that is not what gets me going anyway.

Now I am a tad shocked that vets and I do mean any vets have to pay anything for healthcare. That pisses me off.

jarhead

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Re: How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?
« Reply #41 on: November 11, 2006, 08:48:00 AM »
I want to practice public interest law. ie...work for the DA's office or the Attorney General's office. Public Service no money, no glam, but then that is not what gets me going anyway.

Now I am a tad shocked that vets and I do mean any vets have to pay anything for healthcare. That pisses me off.


it depends on the situation...all vets can get VA benefits its just the process can be long...and dental isn't covered...i know a lot of private insurance that doesn't offer dental so it's not too suprising....once you qualify there are long waits for appointments and depending on where you live there may not be a facility nearby...with the war the priority goes to those injured in combat (as it should)...i have VA benefits and benefits through my employer its a nice security blanket...should i ever God forbid be unemployed i can still get medical treatment...its not like the old days either the treatment at least in the DC area is top notch...don't believe all the negative things that you hear about the miltary im not cranking the propoganda machine or anything but we all, meaning vets, know what we're getting into...

LadyKD

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Re: How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?
« Reply #42 on: November 11, 2006, 07:14:18 PM »
I understand Jarhead, I just think the people who are willing to join and be in the line of fire get the short end of the stick. I hear all these stories about Veterns on welfare and coming home from service broke and homeless, to me that is some bullcrap and should not be happening. We owe are Vets a little more respect.

Re: How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?
« Reply #43 on: November 11, 2006, 07:35:44 PM »
I understand Jarhead, I just think the people who are willing to join and be in the line of fire get the short end of the stick. I hear all these stories about Veterns on welfare and coming home from service broke and homeless, to me that is some bullcrap and should not be happening. We owe are Vets a little more respect.

I agree. Vets do have a difficult time and it is not unusual to hear of them struggling. All the vets I know that decide to leave the service go through a tough adjustment period.

lisak

Re: How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?
« Reply #44 on: December 08, 2006, 12:05:47 PM »
Since I (1) have an MBA from a top 25 school, am a Certified Fraud Examiner, and will be a CPA by the time I start law school and (2) have worked on forensic investigations involving class action securities cases, antitrust cases, fraud cases, and digital music cases for the last 10 years, I would like to specialize in securities litigation, M&A transactions, and IPOs (not sure if transactional or litigation) in the high tech industry.

I think these are good, complementary areas for my background.  I am also fascinated with the high tech industry / digital media area so I would also like experience working on transactions involving music licensing deals.  Also, given my interests, I would not be surprised if I ended up at some point working in-house at a startup or at a corporation in the high-tech area after, hopefully, doing a clerkship and BigLaw for a couple of years.

So, I definitely would say that my background (work experience) has directed my interest in particular subject areas of the law.  I have been doing a lot of research on the best LSs for these areas (securities, M&A, IPOs, high tech), and it seems that most of the top schools (Top 20) are the ones that have the strongest business law and law & economics programs (at least according to the Leiter rankings).  As such, those are the schools that I am shooting for in Fall 2008. 

I have to still take the LSAT (which I am studying for right now) but have my letters of rec lined up, my personal statement and diversity essays written (though I still need to scrub them and write my statement of purpose), and am trying to save some money for LS.  Hopefully, I will do really well on my LSAT...scheduled to take it in February 2006 but may postpone until June 2006 if I don't feel ready...and be all set for applying early in the cycle next year.

Best of luck to everyone in their LS endeavors.  My personal opinion is that the more you can know about yourself (what kind of law appeals to you before LS and the more experience you have in that area), the better.  I think it can only help in directing you to elective courses that make sense for you and that you will do well in because you are passionate about them and truly interested in them.  I think it can also only help you in the job search (from as early as summer 1L...on to graduation) since your career trajectory makes sense (can be easily explained to recruiters / law firms / judges).  Those are just my theories though.

And I can honestly say that I am glad that I did not go directly to LS after undergrad.  At the same time I say that, I am a bit nervous about being one of the older people in my class (I would be 37 when I enter LS).  ::)  Anyway, those are my thoughts.

 :) Lisa

Para Legal

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Re: How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?
« Reply #45 on: December 08, 2006, 01:09:40 PM »
Hopefully, I will do really well on my LSAT...scheduled to take it in February 2006 but may postpone until June 2006 if I don't feel ready...and be all set for applying early in the cycle next year.

Take it in June. Give yourself the extra time to study- you'll still be in fine fettle for the next cycle and you won't be taking the Feb test (which is both undisclosed and, from what I understand, harder than the others- i.e. more atypical and experimental.)

Good Luck!

Cheers,

Para

lisak

Re: How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?
« Reply #46 on: December 08, 2006, 01:26:13 PM »
Thanks for the tip, Paralegal!!!  I appreciate it.

I heard that they are changing the reading comp section starting on the June LSAT...do you think that will change the predictability factor of the June test?  Let me know your thoughts...there doesn't seem to be too much info out yet about how it is going to change.  From what I can gather so far (based on the LSAC website), there will be 2 smaller reading comp sections instead of 1 of the normal reading comp sections and the questions will be to compare those passages.  That may actually be better for me, given that RC is my weakest area and the revised format seems to imply that it will be a bit more pattern driven and LR oriented...but I would welcome anyone who has found out more info about this change.  Thanks!!!

:) Lisa

Para Legal

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Re: How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?
« Reply #47 on: December 08, 2006, 08:13:32 PM »
Thanks for the tip, Paralegal!!!  I appreciate it.

I heard that they are changing the reading comp section starting on the June LSAT...do you think that will change the predictability factor of the June test?  Let me know your thoughts...there doesn't seem to be too much info out yet about how it is going to change.  From what I can gather so far (based on the LSAC website), there will be 2 smaller reading comp sections instead of 1 of the normal reading comp sections and the questions will be to compare those passages.  That may actually be better for me, given that RC is my weakest area and the revised format seems to imply that it will be a bit more pattern driven and LR oriented...but I would welcome anyone who has found out more info about this change.  Thanks!!!

:) Lisa

Gladly. That's what LSD is for right (besides inciting anxiety and general mayhem over the process.)

The new RC will be called "comparative reading" and you've got the gist of it: 2 shorter passages with 4-8 questions comparing the two passages. It sounds better than the old RC section, especially if you are good at comparative analysis.

As far as study goes...

1. You have 2 sections of LR to deal with. Study hard on those since they make up most of the test and they aren't changing.
2. Learn games. It's the most teachable and learnable section. They aren't changing either. Find a method that works for you for diagramming/mapping, etc. and learn it so that it's second nature.

75% of the test remains unchanged, so get comfortable with those sections and then worry about the RC closer to the test- you'll likely be able to get your hands on a "bible" of some sort or some practice questions, and you can add this section in once your games are "fun" rather than work, and LR techniques will help immensely. (A good thing to do with games: once you've got your method down, do one every so often as a break in your workday- during a coffee break or at lunch, perhaps to wind down after you get home- rather than a sudoku or crossword. You can also get your time down- you have appx 8 minutes per game. It lets you think of the games as a break in the LSAT action on test day.)

Keep up on all of it, good luck, and you have six months to study- make the most out of it. Study every day and take as many timed, simulated practice exams as you can.

Cheers,

Para

Re: How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?
« Reply #48 on: December 10, 2006, 12:55:51 AM »

I want to work for the government and am interested in administrative law.

Re: How Many People Know What Kind of Lawyer They Want To Be?
« Reply #49 on: December 10, 2006, 03:08:35 PM »
science policy in the states or other country.