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Author Topic: Quitting Work and Going To Law School  (Read 3972 times)

planejane

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Quitting Work and Going To Law School
« on: February 19, 2004, 01:15:38 PM »
I have a question of course.

I want to go to law school and then practice aviation law.  I have almost a decade in the aviation industry now.  I am also a single parent.

Question
How do people just go to law school financially?  Do they live off the student loans?  I will have all my credit cards paid off at the end of the year and I will still have nine months left on my car loan come August 2005.

I want to just go to law school and totally experience it.  I have two associate's degrees and I am completing my bachelor's degree all online.  I want to GO to law school.

Any suggestions on how this financial stuff works?

Thanks!
Christie

prelaw_undergrad

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Re: Quitting Work and Going To Law School
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2004, 01:32:43 PM »
How do people just go to law school financially?  Do they live off the student loans? ...Any suggestions on how this financial stuff works?
 

If a person doesn't get a full-tuition scholarship, or grants, or fellowships, then s/he will have to take out student loans or find a rich benefactor. 

planejane, some loans from the federal government do not start accumulating interest until after you graduate.  I would recommend getting government loans, then getting private loans, if you needed more money.

David Bakody

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Re: Quitting Work and Going To Law School
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2004, 02:52:01 PM »
If you haven't googled for this information already - a few places to start:

http://www.finaid.org/otheraid/law.phtml

http://www.gradloans.com/

During your first year of law school working will prove to be a difficult proposition, unless you enroll into a part time program (which might be something to consider).

I think the majority of law students take out Stafford Loans (loans from the gov) and some fairly reasonable private loans.  Although it depends on the school, it is not unusual for students to graduate with $80K of debt (or more).


camelbx

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Re: Quitting Work and Going To Law School
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2004, 08:54:40 PM »
Also, on a side note depending on which law schools you apply to the Online degree thing can put you at a severe disadvantage. Some schools require you to explain why and such.

Good luck!

 

aquascum

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Re: Quitting Work and Going To Law School
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2004, 10:05:01 PM »
I have a recommendation of a book that deals in significant part with non-traditional law students...Law School for Dummies by Rebecca Greene.  Yes, I know--at first I wasn't sure I'd get all that much serious info out of a For Dummies book, but this one is really aimed at non-traditional students.  I am a 1L this year and before that I transitioned out of a career in teaching high school music for five years.  I am also married with a three-year old son. 

This book was invaluable to me because all the other law school guidebooks I read were geared toward straight-from-college students, and this one included tons of info for us non-trads.

Just my $.02.

jgruber

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Re: Quitting Work and Going To Law School
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2004, 10:42:05 AM »
As a potential lawyer, I am absolutely opposed to admitting I am a dummy!

 ;)


I have a recommendation of a book that deals in significant part with non-traditional law students...Law School for Dummies by Rebecca Greene.  Yes, I know--at first I wasn't sure I'd get all that much serious info out of a For Dummies book, but this one is really aimed at non-traditional students.  I am a 1L this year and before that I transitioned out of a career in teaching high school music for five years.  I am also married with a three-year old son. 

This book was invaluable to me because all the other law school guidebooks I read were geared toward straight-from-college students, and this one included tons of info for us non-trads.

Just my $.02.

jgruber

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Re: Quitting Work and Going To Law School
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2004, 10:48:42 AM »
From what I have read and heard, it comes down to a few choices about money.

1) Pray for scholarships
2) Go into debt big time and work like mad to get a high paying (read work like a dog) position
3) Find a cheaper school (online, night school, etc.) and expect to be at a disadvantage when seeking a competitive position.


I am 48 and applying to law school for the first time.  I cannot stop working so I am compromising and trying for night school, Nashville School of Law.  It is not ABA approved, but has an excellent reputation.  Hell, Al Gore, Sr. was an alum and three years after graduation he was in the US Congress.

I know that a JD from NSL will put me behind Vanderbilt and Harvard and other graduates, but I can live with that because I don't think they and I will be going after the same kinds of positions.

If you want to grab a high-powered, high-paying gig, you'll have to bite the bullet on the bucks.  If your hoped for field of law is not as competitive (I'm hoping to start a small practice in family law in a small town.) then you can afford to compromise.

Ramble, ramble, ramble.  You get the idea.   ;)

I have a question of course.

I want to go to law school and then practice aviation law.  I have almost a decade in the aviation industry now.  I am also a single parent.

Question
How do people just go to law school financially?  Do they live off the student loans?  I will have all my credit cards paid off at the end of the year and I will still have nine months left on my car loan come August 2005.

I want to just go to law school and totally experience it.  I have two associate's degrees and I am completing my bachelor's degree all online.  I want to GO to law school.

Any suggestions on how this financial stuff works?

Thanks!
Christie

planejane

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Re: Quitting Work and Going To Law School
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2004, 11:18:11 AM »
Thanks for the replies everyone.  As far as accredited online degrees goes, you would think it would be almost a plus.  Think about it - to study and get your assignments in on time definitely shows self-discipline.  Also, my schools are southern regionally accredited.  Needless to say, I just wanted to make sure my thoughts about law school and financial aid were right or almost right.

Thanks Guys!

Andrew

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Re: Quitting Work and Going To Law School
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2004, 04:04:21 PM »
A little off topic here but I just want to say that Aerospace Law is really cool.  I ended up taking a class about it because it was the only thing that fit my schedule, but I'm finding it really interesting - lots of international issues arising from the basic need to get people and cargo from one place to another.

planejane

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Re: Quitting Work and Going To Law School
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2004, 08:17:39 AM »
Andrew,

It is really cool.  Aviation law encounters finance, insurance, crashes (of course), products liability, etc.  You get a lot of different practice areas within this one specialization of law.  I used to work for an aviation insurance and law firm.  I loved the work.  It was never boring and never the same scenario twice.  I learned a lot working there and I totally miss it.  This time, instead of being the paralegal when I go back to aviation law, I want to be the attorney!!!!!  I just need that piece of paper with the classes to back it up.  I have been in aviation for nearly ten years and it is the best career I could have picked.  I cannot imagine doing anything else.

See ya!