Law School Discussion

Post Grad GPA vs Undergrad GPA for an MD

Re: Post Grad GPA vs Undergrad GPA for an MD
« Reply #30 on: November 11, 2006, 12:57:23 AM »
If U of MD lets me in, I'll sh*t a cadillac.  I can just feel the cool smoky nicotene laced vapors circling my descending colon..............

plaintext10

Re: Post Grad GPA vs Undergrad GPA for an MD
« Reply #31 on: November 11, 2006, 07:52:59 AM »
I generally view applying part-time with the intent of transferring to full-time douchebaggery, but in a case similar to yours, it might be worth it.  I moved to the MD/DC area for work (DoD / engineering), but having some health conditions was really impressed with the quality of medicine and the biotech industry.  Per medicine, Johns Hopkins, U of Maryland, Georgetown, George Washington, National Institute of Health, etc.    The reason for mentioning these is it's nice to be in an area rich with colleages of similar backgrounds.  And with the emergency medicine background, there's also a shitload of Homeland Security contracts in this region as well.  You have the two murder capitals of the world (Baltimore, DC) which is definitely good business for an ER Dr =)

The wife should also find plenty to keep her busy, be it work, or hopping on the train to DC.  The one negative is the housing tends to be on the high side.

Oh, forgot the obvious, DC is generally a good place for law...

Para Legal

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Re: Post Grad GPA vs Undergrad GPA for an MD
« Reply #32 on: December 09, 2006, 08:18:46 AM »
Will someone just blow smoke up my ass and tell me that I'll be OK?  JK, I appreciate all of the responses and honesty.  Tier 2 1/2 here I come......

You're gonna be fine.

You've already proven yourself- your LSDAS report will show your med school transcript and you can always add a GPA addendum- hell, you've practically written it in the last few posts.

Your soft factors will get you to the adcomms, and it sounds like you know what you want to do and why you want to leave medicine. Make it obvious in your statement that you know exactly what you want from law school, and be blunt about what you bring to the table (MD, practical experience, academic ability far surpassing your LSAT score) and you've got a shot at any of the schools you've listed.

Best of luck- keep us posted on your cycle.

Cheers,

Para

Re: Post Grad GPA vs Undergrad GPA for an MD
« Reply #33 on: December 22, 2006, 07:57:22 PM »
Will someone just blow smoke up my ass and tell me that I'll be OK?  JK, I appreciate all of the responses and honesty.  Tier 2 1/2 here I come......

First off, you rock. I'm so jealous...I'm a 1L and would kill to do an MD/JD. Unfortunately, debt sucks--you are so incredibly wise to not back yourself into another debt induced corner. 

Secondly, whereas I *generally* fall into the "numbers are the golden ticket" I think your case might be unique. But honestly, I don't care WHERE you go for law school (barring the obvious why waste your money choices) you will have firms recruiting you your first year. Not only will you secure a 1L summer job but they will chase you and hound you and send you care packages during finals. You have a million doors open to you--patent law, healthcare law, hospital administration, medical device litigation et al, pharmaceuticals, start up/venture capital on the biotech end...do I need to continue? If you're near a T1 school and really want to go to that one b/c you don't want to relocate then shoot for it. Call the admissions office and talk to them. 

You will certainly be fine. And this is no smoke...just facts.  Why do I know/think this? Because I had my heart *set* on an MD/JD and I did a ton of research to figure it out. If you can do law school without the debt of med school you are in an amazing situation. Pick a school that makes you smile and doesn't put you into too much debt and enjoy it--good luck and best wishes

GG

Lily Jaye

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Re: Post Grad GPA vs Undergrad GPA for an MD
« Reply #34 on: December 22, 2006, 07:59:47 PM »
I'm glad I found this board for Non-traditional applicants!  ok, here's my question: If the LSAC sends the undergrad GPA number, how do I make sure the adcoms get my postgraduate GPA, and what effect will it have on my application? Am I stuck in the standard index number given based only on LSAT and undergrad GPA?

My situation is this:  I am a physician, 34 y.o., and leaving medicine. My undergrad GPA kind of sucks, like a 2.8-3.0.  But my medical school and postgrad GPA is strong, in the 3.5-3.8 range.  I am applying to multiple schools with a healthcare law program, some are T1 some T2.  I hate to think that I could get flushed from consideration at some T1 schools just due to my UGPA.  My LSAT was disappointing, only a 156 (70 th percentile)despite testing repeatedly at 165 on numerous practice tests.  I am more than 10 years out from undergrad days and have been in private practice for over 5 years since residency.

Does anyone have any answers or experience in this area?  Are there any MD's like me going through this little torture session of applications?  Any thoughts or suggestions are appreciated.

Hopkins' MPH program may be a backdoor to Georgetown law.  Most people apply to Georgetown and then Hopkins, and consequently get preferential treatment at Hopkins. I have a hunch that it also works the other way, especially for MDs, but I'm not sure. :-\

Re: Post Grad GPA vs Undergrad GPA for an MD
« Reply #35 on: December 24, 2006, 07:05:36 AM »
Loyola (Chicago) is on my list.  I am alittle concerned over the commute issue though.  I have a wife and 2 dogs, and just don't think apartment life is for me.  I would have to live in the 'burbs abd have a house.  That probably leaves me riding the train, a scary prospect for me...
Don't discount the train. Providing you don't get motion sick, the train's a great place to read. Loyola would be a bit of a haul, though, in that it's not right near the suburban stations, so that means going from a suburban train to CTA to get to their campus. In general, though, extended stretches on public transit are not so bad for reading (again, with the 'no motion sickness or other mitigating factor' provision).