Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: University of Washington  (Read 8590 times)

Burnanator

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 27
    • View Profile
Re: University of Washington
« Reply #30 on: December 22, 2006, 12:01:54 AM »
You have to look at the salaries in context of average wages and living expenses for the Pacific NW. Making $60-$95K per year in Washington, Oregon, or Idaho is actually good pay. You could easily make two car payments, purchase a nice home, and live an upper middle-class lifestyle. And don't forget about academic loans--if you graduate from UW, you will have, on average, much less financial baggage to deal with.

I think an attorney in the Pacific NW making $75 would have a better lifestyle than an attorney making $125 in LA, Chicago, NYC, or Boston. Even with $125K, there's no way you could afford a home REMOTELY comparable to one in the Pacific NW. And, realistically, the only people making that kind of money live in big cities, probably have huge law school debts, and work ridiculous hours.

In terms of quality of life, I think most UW grads are doing quite well.
Wisdom begins in wonder.
            - Socrates

thewanderer01

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 63
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: University of Washington
« Reply #31 on: December 22, 2006, 12:00:59 PM »
honestly, i think the whole in-state preference is way overblown for washington.  it's a different story when you get to accepting people off the waitlist (pretty much all in-staters).  But, for regular admission cycle, they're more interested in the straight up numbers. 

just looking at lsn, my sense is that a school like UT is much more serious about their in-state requirement than UW.  UT seems to admit people with much lower indexes that are from texas, but UW doesn't seem to do this until the waitlist period.

4.0 with a 163 will be a very strong app. for UW, but certainly not a lock (even if you were in-state).  in my mind, a lock is if both of your stats are at or above 75 percentile. 

Is preference given to Washington state residents?
It is faculty policy that approximately 70% be established as a target for the percentage of Washington state residents in the entering class. However, residency is not a major factor in an admissions decision.


http://www.law.washington.edu/Admissions/FAQ.html
Rutgers - Newark Class of 2010

bamf

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3381
  • legal eagle
    • View Profile
Re: University of Washington
« Reply #32 on: December 22, 2006, 12:10:05 PM »
honestly, i think the whole in-state preference is way overblown for washington.  it's a different story when you get to accepting people off the waitlist (pretty much all in-staters).  But, for regular admission cycle, they're more interested in the straight up numbers. 

just looking at lsn, my sense is that a school like UT is much more serious about their in-state requirement than UW.  UT seems to admit people with much lower indexes that are from texas, but UW doesn't seem to do this until the waitlist period.

4.0 with a 163 will be a very strong app. for UW, but certainly not a lock (even if you were in-state).  in my mind, a lock is if both of your stats are at or above 75 percentile. 

Is preference given to Washington state residents?
It is faculty policy that approximately 70% be established as a target for the percentage of Washington state residents in the entering class. However, residency is not a major factor in an admissions decision.


http://www.law.washington.edu/Admissions/FAQ.html


Last year I think it was only 60 though

in my notes I have that in 2005 UW rejected 30/ 80 people from my category (163-65/ 3.75+) even though their median lsat was ( I believe) a 162.  This probably reflects the in state preference.

You have to look at the salaries in context of average wages and living expenses for the Pacific NW. Making $60-$95K per year in Washington, Oregon, or Idaho is actually good pay. You could easily make two car payments, purchase a nice home, and live an upper middle-class lifestyle. And don't forget about academic loans--if you graduate from UW, you will have, on average, much less financial baggage to deal with.

I think an attorney in the Pacific NW making $75 would have a better lifestyle than an attorney making $125 in LA, Chicago, NYC, or Boston. Even with $125K, there's no way you could afford a home REMOTELY comparable to one in the Pacific NW. And, realistically, the only people making that kind of money live in big cities, probably have huge law school debts, and work ridiculous hours.

In terms of quality of life, I think most UW grads are doing quite well.

I have never been to the PNW or Seattle, but I was under the impression that COL was fairly high ... not NYC/ LA/ DC level, but perhaps Boston level...
2L, Boston College Law

http://lawschoolnumbers.com/bamf

Around from time to time.  Always willing to answer any Qs about BC, my '06/'07 cycle or law school in general ... PMs work better ...

Burnanator

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 27
    • View Profile
Re: University of Washington
« Reply #33 on: December 22, 2006, 12:43:48 PM »
I think it's pretty high in downtown Seattle and the surrounding burroughs (if that's what they call them?), but home prices are pretty reasonable everywhere else. A nice 3,000 sft home would run somewhere between $300-$600K depending on location. The same home in LA, NYC, DC, or Chicago would probably run well over $1.25M. I don't know anything about the Boston market, but it's probably comparable?

The difference in home prices (and property taxes) alone is worth $45,000+/year. (Compare the two mortgage payments here: http://www.mortgage-calc.com/mortgage/simple.php)

I'm partial to the NW, what can I say. You should come visit.
Wisdom begins in wonder.
            - Socrates

Clipse

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 189
  • Strictly Bathing Ape, Ice Cream, and BBC rocker...
    • View Profile
Re: University of Washington
« Reply #34 on: December 22, 2006, 07:53:48 PM »
I think it's pretty high in downtown Seattle and the surrounding burroughs (if that's what they call them?), but home prices are pretty reasonable everywhere else. A nice 3,000 sft home would run somewhere between $300-$600K depending on location. The same home in LA, NYC, DC, or Chicago would probably run well over $1.25M. I don't know anything about the Boston market, but it's probably comparable?

The difference in home prices (and property taxes) alone is worth $45,000+/year. (Compare the two mortgage payments here: http://www.mortgage-calc.com/mortgage/simple.php)

I'm partial to the NW, what can I say. You should come visit.

Also, no state income tax. I love being from WA.
LSN
“We rich, we get the best judicial advice” (In): BU, Loyola, UC-H, GW, UW
“So heartbreakin, like lovin a whore” (Out): GULC, M, D, V
 “Feels like kids and cake mix, can't wait to lick the bowl” (WL): BC, USC, AU, UCLA, W&M

lisak

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
    • View Profile
Re: University of Washington
« Reply #35 on: January 19, 2007, 07:39:04 PM »
plus seattle is the most literate city in the US and has the highest percentage of college grads.  CostCo, Microsoft and Nintendo are all HQed there ... what else in life do you need?

though last night i was looking through my Udub book and their avg starting salary is significantly lower than their peer schools.  It wasn't different for those going to 250-500+ person firms, but everything else was real low, which kind of bothered me because it seems seattle is a pretty expensive city to live in. 

I live in Seattle and have worked with a bunch of the law firms (as a consultant) here in Seattle for quite a few years.  And just so you know, the Seattle legal market has some pretty big name law firms that are based and / or have huge offices here like Preston Gates & Ellis and Perkins Coie as well as satellite offices of other major firms like Graham&Dunn, Davis Wright Tremaine, Lane Powell Spears Lubersky LLP, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, and Summit Law Group.  So, there definitely are law firms based in Seattle (and, as such, I would imagine that they recruit quite heavily from UW).

And there are a lot of corporations based here (who also need legal help) like the ones that have been mentioned above plus other big names like Safeco, RealNetworks, Expeditors, REI, Weyerhouser, Expedia, Boeing (okay, it used to be based here...but a lot of business folks are still here), Clearwire, Honeywell, not to mention a ton of startups who desperately need legal advice.

I think the real problem is that Seattle is such a beautiful place to live (with a great quality of life) so I don't think too many people who go to UW try to move elsewhere and that creates a situation where not a lot of people outside the PNW (or West Coast) know the high caliber of person graduating from UW. 

Also, since it is so beautiful here in Seattle (sans the recent snow and ice), lawyers in general don't tend to migrate too much (they kind of stay in Seattle, rather than move to other cities)...and I think this leads to kind of a saturated legal market (with slightly less prospects for graduates trying to enter the Seattle legal market).  Those are just my thoughts...I could be wrong, but I thought I would share...

 :)

jeff2486

  • Guest
Re: University of Washington
« Reply #36 on: January 19, 2007, 07:59:33 PM »
UW oughta start sending decisions.

smile

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 76
  • 168/3.5
    • View Profile
    • For the love of God, someone accept me!
Re: University of Washington
« Reply #37 on: January 20, 2007, 09:54:14 AM »
UW oughta start sending decisions.


Yes, they oughta.  And every day they don't I die a little inside.

smallandmighty

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 38
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: University of Washington
« Reply #38 on: January 22, 2007, 07:01:17 PM »
Waiting for UW, still waiting for UW.  Waiting for UW is awesome.  Really.

Mpmav1

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 204
    • View Profile
Re: University of Washington
« Reply #39 on: January 22, 2007, 07:08:32 PM »
I would just assume that none of us will hear for another month or so from the wonderfully slow UW...

but like 99% of all postings on LSD, I'm just guessing.