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Vick

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« on: October 25, 2006, 12:09:58 PM »
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chitwee

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Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2006, 12:22:52 PM »
My personal opinion is to go would with the mission one.  Loads of reasons, but mainly being:  I went on a mission to Brazil and learned Portuguese, and have first hand experience with learning a new language in a short period of time too (completely fluent after 4 months being in Brazil)- it is character building like nothing else compares.  Another reason is that a mission in and of itself is an overwhelming experience, and on top of that you add learning a different language- WOW!

I don't know anything about fixed-gears, but I have a passion for fixing up houses.  I've done tons of remodeling (ie. put a new kitchen in, tile work, plumbing, etc) and I just don't think it has the same depth to it.  It is character building too, just in a different way.

I really don't think you could go wrong.  Both are interesting and character defining.  Which one is more interesting to you?

I'm going to write about either the mission, or about being the Vice President of the largest monument (gravestones) company in the mountain west.  I haven't decided either what I'll do.  The mission was 10 years ago for me, so I think I should focus on more recent events..

Good luck deciding

zoom

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Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2006, 12:24:08 PM »
Crazy--I just decided last night to rewrite my PS for the same reason.  I've heard good things about your first PS and I would love to read its sequel.  Send the original so I can c&c them.

sladkaya

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Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2006, 12:27:02 PM »
I vote for the bike PS (and I'll read, if you don't mind waiting a few days).  Do you already have a diversity statement?  That's where mission work and learning a new language could go.  Not necessarily to show that you're different from other applicants because you did a mission, but because the skills you gained while doing the work make you more likely to speak up in class/view things from a different perspective/take on new projects no matter how hard they seem initially. I think put together, these two statements could really show the adcoms both your background and your passions.
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Hannibal

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Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2006, 01:03:55 PM »
I vote for the bike PS (and I'll read, if you don't mind waiting a few days).  Do you already have a diversity statement?  That's where mission work and learning a new language could go.  Not necessarily to show that you're different from other applicants because you did a mission, but because the skills you gained while doing the work make you more likely to speak up in class/view things from a different perspective/take on new projects no matter how hard they seem initially. I think put together, these two statements could really show the adcoms both your background and your passions.

TITCR

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Penelope

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Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2006, 01:14:05 PM »
i would go with the Mormon Mission over the fixed gear bike stuff.. while building fixed gear bikes is great (i have one that i built) i don't think it shown nearly as much about you.. it's supposed to be a personal statement, not a how-to on bike building..

if you really want, make a paragraph about bike building and tie it into your main missionary statement, but otherwise, i think it's too trivial a subject to devote two pages to.
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K.C.

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Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2006, 02:11:48 PM »
If possible, why don't you try incorporating both of those topics into you Personal Statement? You will probably not be able to write on both equally, but you can do both. It is a personal statement, and I hope that not only one thing defines you as a potential law student. It could be useful to compare and contrast some things about you.

Also, depending on the schools you plan to apply to, some of them may give you a chance to write an optional essay along with your personal statement.

I've talked with my LSAT instructor and a few guys that are involved with writing Admission Essays, and they mention that the topic isn't the most important thing. It's the journey and the growth of the individual. Granted, some topics may be more inherently interesting and be more unique.

They read some great essays they've helped out with. One was from a Tongan woman who grew up in a repressed male-dominated society, one guy wrote about how he had to help his son stop using a binky, one girl wrote about the sentencing of her brother's murderer, a guy wrote about how he thinks women should stop working (and if I remember correctly, he got into Berkeley), one girl talks of her ambitions to become a supreme court justice, and there was an essay about a discussion about Yoplait Yogurt vs. Dannon Yogurt.


I'm kind of the opposite side of you, I'm a Mormon who didn't go on a mission but still went to BYU and BYU-Hawaii and currently live in Utah. And though I'm a Libertarian, I get classified as being a Democrat/Liberal because I disagree with the Republican Party as it is known today. That's not the main point of my personal statement, but I mention it to talk about some of the alienation and struggles I've been through. It's not easy being "different" in a religious community, but it's the differences that make life unique for everyone.

mantis

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Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2006, 02:44:44 PM »
I vote for the bike PS (and I'll read, if you don't mind waiting a few days).  Do you already have a diversity statement?  That's where mission work and learning a new language could go.  Not necessarily to show that you're different from other applicants because you did a mission, but because the skills you gained while doing the work make you more likely to speak up in class/view things from a different perspective/take on new projects no matter how hard they seem initially. I think put together, these two statements could really show the adcoms both your background and your passions.

I also agree with this one... and would love to read both, if you're still looking for readers.

midgetpiggyback

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Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2006, 05:46:32 PM »
I'm a 1L right now. I found that every school that I applied to either asked for a diversity statement, an optional essay, or anything else that would help the admissions people get a better idea of who you are. I did a personal statement and then added on a totally separate essay about my mission experience and it worked out well. Just make sure that they work well together (i.e., don't write your personal statement about your experience as a porn star and your optional essay about your mission). Another tip I would give for writing about your mission is to make sure you understand your audience. If you are writing to Notre Dame, then don't worry about talking about religious experiences and the like, they may even like that. But if you are writing to a more liberal school like Berkeley, leave that stuff out and focus on the cultural/social/education experiences. I think that this would apply to just about any school that does not have a religious affiliation of some sort. There is a time and a place for everything, and some people don't want a "preachy" application. I opted to talk more about some specific people that I met and how they affected me as well as leadership experience. I went stateside, so I didn't have many cool things to talk about. Another suggestion: if you are applying to BYU or Utah, they don't really care about your experiences as a missionary. Almost everyone that is applying at those schools is a return missionary. And yet another suggestion: some schools absolutely love return missionaries. I know from talking with one of the associate deans at Iowa that he is sent to the law school fairs at BYU and the UofU specifically because he is a mormon and he can recruit missionaries through his church connections. They are the only law school fairs that he goes to. I know it sounds weird, but he told me himself when I met him last year.

jer

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Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2006, 05:52:10 PM »
ya know,
now that i think about it,
i like fixed gear bicycles, as well
i mean, i really, really like them.
i guess you could call it a new passion of mine

/off to rewrite my ps
//i kid, i kid
///sounds like it is a good area to stand out from the crowd.  fill it with references to stuff they won't completely understand but wow them with your writing ability, that's what they're after