Law School Discussion

.

zoom

  • ****
  • 723
    • View Profile
Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission?
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2006, 09:07:41 AM »
It does sound tempting to me....  How do you use your bike? Recreation/transportation?   Do you own any non-fixies? I could be down with one for my leisurely jaunts to the market.  I'll use your PS as a how-to guide! Don't worry though I won't write my PS on it. ;) I still don't understand the no-brakes thing though.  Is it a manly thing? 

zoom

  • ****
  • 723
    • View Profile
Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission?
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2006, 10:41:47 AM »
I use mine to commute to work and run errands around town.  In addition to two fixed-gears, I also have a geared road-bike that I ride on the weekends and a single-speed mountain bike that's collecting dust. 
The brake thing?  Yeah, I guess it's one of those manly things.  I just love the pure simplicity of my non-brake fixie.  If you ride where there are hills (or terrible drivers) then a brake is a necessity, but my rides are mostly flat, bare city streets where it's easy to slow down by resisting the pedals.   

I think a minimalist single gear is what I'm craving.  Somthing light-weight that doesn't scream "steal me!"  A practical comuter bike, if you will.  Something like this:



Now, obviously you have a true passion for bikes, but do you ever feel like many of the people riding "fixies" are the same people that were longboarding and wearing trucker hats not too long ago? For many is it just the latest fad?

Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission?
« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2006, 11:25:35 AM »
i ride to work in LA, so i have to have a front brake.  i think riding brakeless is a manliness thing, because i try to use my brake as little as possible for no other reason than it's more of a challenge.
it is a fad, and to be honest that's probably why i was even aware of it (before it was cool).  i was in SF a few weeks ago, and there were no derailleurs in sight.  still, it's a fun hobby, and i got over the whole sellout, poseur, etc. arguments long ago.

zoom

  • ****
  • 723
    • View Profile
Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission?
« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2006, 12:04:00 PM »
i ride to work in LA, so i have to have a front brake.  i think riding brakeless is a manliness thing, because i try to use my brake as little as possible for no other reason than it's more of a challenge.
it is a fad, and to be honest that's probably why i was even aware of it (before it was cool).  i was in SF a few weeks ago, and there were no derailleurs in sight.  still, it's a fun hobby, and i got over the whole sellout, poseur, etc. arguments long ago.

Ain't nothing wrong with more people biking.  Even better if they're all on the road (and not on the trails ;)) I can't imgaine going fixed gear in SF?  With all those hills? That's pretty manly. You guys ever do the Critical Mass rides?

Tron

  • ****
  • 126
    • View Profile
Re: Fixed-gears or Mormon Mission?
« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2006, 12:01:41 PM »
Back to your original question...though I think it is really cool that you all have a fun hobby.

First, your original question is all wrong. I don't think it is wise to approach the personal statement as: how can I sound way different and unique than any other applicant? I'm sorry to say, but no matter what you've done in life there are at least one hundred others that have done something cooler. So, make your personal statement about YOU!
I found myself in a similar quandry when writing my PS. Missions are cool experiences but so are a lot of other interests, etc. I think you need to find which statement gives a fuller sense of who you are. In my opinion the personal statement isn't an opportunity to just talk about something neat about yourself, but to prove a characteristic(s) that you feel will make you a successful law student. I ultimately discussed my missionary service because I found it to be more indicative of who I am and decided that I don't really care if others write about their missionary service. 

I did look on your lsn profile though and I will give this warning: I went to Utah's application seminar and the Dean expressly stated not to write about missions to their school. BYU is also a tough one, probably 65% of their applicants served missions, your call.