Law School Discussion

/

/
« on: October 23, 2006, 02:26:02 PM »
.

jer

  • *****
  • 15820
  • i likes gold chapstick
    • View Profile
Re: stimulus or question stem first
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2006, 02:43:10 PM »
everyone is different
if you are struggling to make it through a lr section, reading the question stem first may add on even more time and prevent you from answering a few questions.

if you want, try a practice test reading the question stem first and see how it affects your timing.  one thing i would recommend is do not read the question stem first on the first ten since those are usually the easiest.  after the first ten questions, you start to see some more difficult questions, so you could try one timed lr section where you read the question stem first for 11-25.

for me, what helped was, during practice tests, i would try to read the stimulus and figure out what type of question they would go with, helped me to keep a critical eye on tricky words and phrases.  reading the question stem first ate up too much time.

Sonny C.

Re: stimulus or question stem first
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2006, 02:53:30 PM »
I practiced both ways and, for me, reading the question stem first ended up actually saving me time because I knew already what I was looking for. Thus, I spent less time referring back to the stimulus when considering similar answer choices.

redemption

Re: stimulus or question stem first
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2006, 06:17:10 PM »
You should always ALWAYS read the stimulus first. ALWAYS. God Kaplan sucks.

President_Baccaga

Re: stimulus or question stem first
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2006, 06:35:16 PM »
Personally I prefer the stimulus first.  Reading the question does little/nothing, you're going to re-read it a second time after you read the stimulus, and if you do enough practice tests, you're going to become so familiar with the material that you will be able to predict the question 90% of the time by reading the stimulus by itself.

Re: stimulus or question stem first
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2006, 09:20:33 AM »
Actually, I took Kaplan.  I did a ton better reading the question first- with their method and what they tell you to look for you pick apart the stimulus as you read and it made it a SO much easier for me.  I didnt predict, but I knew what to look for.  Plus, if you read the ques. stem you probably wont need to re-read it- I never did, once was enough.  Its personal preference, but I went up 10 points on the official test (16 with my highest practice), even though I couldnt concentrate on the ques with a cell phone going off and missed the last 4!  Bummer.  But then I never had a problem with LR timing and pacing too.  I can completely understand how it could throw you off.  Bottom line- diff. methods work for different people, so I agree with the first post, try both and see which works for you.

PS  I was very happy with what Kaplan taught me!  I'd recommend it to anyone, and so did my prof.'s and attorneys at my office  ;)

redemption

Re: stimulus or question stem first
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2006, 01:37:55 PM »
You should always ALWAYS read the stimulus first. ALWAYS. God Kaplan sucks.

Do you think reading the stimulus first is better just from a timing perspective? Or do you think that it gives you a better shot at each individual question?

Read the stimulus properly and you can anticipate what the correct answer will be even before you've seen the stem. That should be the goal of LR preparation: Anticipate, read the stem to verify, find the answer, and move on to the next one.

jer

  • *****
  • 15820
  • i likes gold chapstick
    • View Profile
Re: stimulus or question stem first
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2006, 02:12:23 PM »
You should always ALWAYS read the stimulus first. ALWAYS. God Kaplan sucks.

Do you think reading the stimulus first is better just from a timing perspective? Or do you think that it gives you a better shot at each individual question?

Read the stimulus properly and you can anticipate what the correct answer will be even before you've seen the stem. That should be the goal of LR preparation: Anticipate, read the stem to verify, find the answer, and move on to the next one.


if you do enough practice tests, while you are reading the stimulus you can automatically spot potential question areas from the stimulus.  if you approach your lr section with critical reading skills, that will help immensely in the rc section.
this is even more helpful when one stimulus has two questions.
if you read each question before the stimulus, you are having to read it again to make sure you know what you are looking for.  that time really adds up and can cause to to not make it to some questions.
it just seems like it is worth the effort to do practice tests with an eye for critical reading....and anticipating the questions from the stimulus really puts you in an LSAT frame of mind.  if it is second nature, that can help alleviate stress the day of the exam.  taking a practice test is very different from sitting for the real deal, take full advantage of study time to be as prepared as possible.

redemption

Re: stimulus or question stem first
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2006, 02:16:01 PM »
Second nature, that's exactly it.

jer

  • *****
  • 15820
  • i likes gold chapstick
    • View Profile
Re: stimulus or question stem first
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2006, 02:58:33 PM »
You should always ALWAYS read the stimulus first. ALWAYS. God Kaplan sucks.

Do you think reading the stimulus first is better just from a timing perspective? Or do you think that it gives you a better shot at each individual question?

Read the stimulus properly and you can anticipate what the correct answer will be even before you've seen the stem. That should be the goal of LR preparation: Anticipate, read the stem to verify, find the answer, and move on to the next one.

Sounds reasonable. I probably did pick up the question-first strategy from Kaplan. I think a lot of their strategies are aimed at lower-scorers.

that is my impression of kaplan.
they gear the course to try to get people struggling with all of the concepts to a solid 150-ish score.
but they don't go into detail about every question type so you understand each one and build from there.

from what i hear, testmasters may be a bit on the other end, being geared for people who already have a solid graps of the concepts and trying to hit 170s.

powerscore is who i went with, and they really have no problem with someone starting out in the 140s or 150s and showing them how they can score 160s and 170s by focusing on the specific concepts being tested by each type of question.  but you have to do a whole lot of homework for the concepts to sink in.  if you don't put in the time, you can't reach your full potential.  you almost turn into an LSAT zombie, you focus on it so much up to the lsat, then you quit cold turkey.