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Author Topic: international law & career opportunities  (Read 2060 times)

ehmin17

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international law & career opportunities
« on: February 15, 2004, 04:48:21 AM »
this may be a stupid question, but please humor me ... what exactly does international law involve and what career opportunities does the field offer (jobs, salaries, etc.)? Also, what schools are strong in international law? thanks ...

bobfett33

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Re: international law & career opportunities
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2004, 05:37:04 PM »
Working for any type of international NGO (or within the American government in its dealings with other nation-states).  United Nations, Red Cross (or Red Crescent), Greenpeace, or if you're a jerk maybe the WTO.

ehmin17

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Re: international law & career opportunities
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2004, 06:19:59 PM »
so not exactly something i want to be pursuing if making money's a high priority, huh?

Between

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Re: international law & career opportunities
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2004, 07:53:37 AM »
Don't be discouraged by that incomplete answer. You can do almost everything with an international law concentration track. Want to work for Microsoft International? Sony America? American embassy in Japan? Australia? Iraq?

The truth is, intl law covers a broad aspect of the legal world. I myself plan on concentrating on it and going to work in Japan.

Regarding money, anywhere from 35 to 150k starting salary.

Good luck, and maybe we'll work together someday... ;)

bobfett33

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Re: international law & career opportunities
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2004, 02:58:28 PM »
That was true, some people with intn'l law degrees do go on to work in regular corporate law jobs with an international component to them.  However, the intn'l law emphasis is, from my understanding, generally something that goes along with government and/or public interest work. 

If you want to work for Sony International, I'd say you ought to focus on corporate law and take Japanese language classes on the side.

romancingthestone

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Re: international law & career opportunities
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2004, 03:02:51 PM »
Where are you getting that info?  I don't think it's assumed that international law= public interest.  Many schools with strong international law departments offer only a perfunctory human rights class, the rest focusing on trade, multinationals, comparative law, etc.  International Business is a field in it's own right.  Look at Stanford -- great international law, not much for international human or environmental rights. 

bobfett33

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Re: international law & career opportunities
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2004, 03:29:27 PM »
I must just be projecting my own intentions.

bellejoliemtl

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Re: international law & career opportunities
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2004, 10:47:04 PM »
That's what I found as a response to your question:

Basically, International Law is divided into Public International Law (law of treaties, conventions, bilateral or multilateral agreements, all of which are negotiated between sovereign states by mutual agreement - for instance border issues, human rights issues, environment, security, laws of war, intergovernmental institutions, etc.), and Private International Law (commercial law governing trade between countries, rules of international trade, intellectual property, etc).

My current work is in international criminal law, which is mostly treaty based, but is also a patchwork of international courts and tribunals (ICTY, ICTR, ICC), state practice, and some evolving principles of universal jurisdiction - i.e. put simply, the principle that some crimes, like genocide, are so grave, that they may be tried in certain jurisdictions regardless of whether the perpetrator or victims were from that jurisdiction.
About employment...Some firms indeed serve as consultants to governments and international institutions on public international law, but the vast majority of these advisors tend to be NGO experts, academics or government advisors. Most big New York firms with an "international law" practice will typically work on things like acquisitions and mergers, investment banking, etc. which require knowledge of domestic laws in individual countries. Often a firm will have offices in different countries with national legal experts who work transnationally as a team.

Some of the most exciting opportunities in international law these days are in public international law. There have been historic developments in the last 10 years which have led to the enforcement of human rights and humanitarian law (laws of war) in international tribunals. You could work for international courts or tribunals, human rights organizations, think tanks, governments, the UN, universities, etc. The quality of life is much better than in large firm (it can be very tiring with 80 hour work weeks...yikes!) and you would be making meaningful difference in the world...

bobfett33

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Re: international law & career opportunities
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2004, 05:54:19 PM »
The quality of life is much better than in large firm (it can be very tiring with 80 hour work weeks...yikes!) and you would be making meaningful difference in the world...


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