Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Career with a JD  (Read 1316 times)

Bill1121

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
    • View Profile
Career with a JD
« on: October 06, 2006, 09:45:47 PM »
Besides being a practicing lawyer, what jobs can you get with a law degree?  Is anyone here going to law school knowing they don't want to practice?

lawrenc967

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 28
    • View Profile
Re: Career with a JD
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2006, 02:42:41 PM »
agreed

ms

  • Guest
Re: Career with a JD
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2006, 01:31:13 AM »
I disagree there are plenty of other things in that subject area you can do with that degree. Teaching would be the one that comes to mind first.

Tuttipoopoo

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 529
    • View Profile
Re: Career with a JD
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2006, 01:45:24 AM »
Is it realistic to think that a law degree could be used in business or real estate/property acquisition?  My father does lots of buying and selling of property in which cases he ALWAYS needs a lawyer for the paper work and contracts and what not.  I was hoping to perhaps one day do something similar without needing to spend 250+ an hour on a lawyer. 

Also just having a law degree in general can add weight to a business meeting where you're trying to negotiate on a deal.  At least that's what some of my father's friends have told me.
Waiting.....

fmlaw

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 251
  • i'm so cool...
    • View Profile
    • LSN
    • Email
Re: Career with a JD
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2006, 11:35:26 AM »
a lot of JDs go into policy and and lobbying. You dont have to practice "law" to be a lawyer
admitted: IU-B ($$), UIUC, SMU
waitlisted:
denied: G-Town
still waiting: Boalt,UT, Vandy, UCLA, George Mason,UVA, Duke,
Northwestern


http://lawschoolnumbers.com/display.php?user=fmlaw

zoom

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 764
    • View Profile
Re: Career with a JD
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2006, 12:08:50 PM »
Is it realistic to think that a law degree could be used in business or real estate/property acquisition?  My father does lots of buying and selling of property in which cases he ALWAYS needs a lawyer for the paper work and contracts and what not.  I was hoping to perhaps one day do something similar without needing to spend 250+ an hour on a lawyer. 

several of the top-earning exec's in the real estate development company I work for have JD's and only one of them is working in a traditional lawyer role (he's the general counsel.)  There is defenitely a lot of JD's in real estate. 

juliemccoy

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1632
  • Treat??
    • View Profile
Re: Career with a JD
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2006, 12:21:29 PM »
To teach law you need an LLM and/or SJD. So there is a lot more $$$ and time than just a three year law degree.

To work in public policy, you don't need a JD. A BA/BS is fine. There are also Master's degrees in public policy that you can earn in 2 years for less time and money than a JD.

Having business clout is what helps in a business meeting. Yes, a JD is a prestigious degree, but it is, again, a lot of time and money to invest to believe that you can name-drop and have people take you seriously at a future business meeting. It is also foolish to think that having the degree and no practical experience will make you credible in a board room.

In real estate, you can become a real estate lawyer or become certified to sell property. You don't need a JD to be a realtor, broker or contractor, but you can pracice law within real estate.

People get a JD to become an attorney. You don't have to be one for your entire life and you can certainly change careers, but it is a three year investment of time and over $100K. You can get an MBA or a master's degree for less money and in less time if you want to be a college professor or learn business skills in a classroom. Think about it: $100+K. That is a lot of money. Three years of your life where you could be working and earning money, and having a life. That's 1095 days of your life, untold hours in the library, stress and being broke. Just so you can have a JD, the degree of an attorney, and then turn around to work and do something else. You can take $100K and 3 years of your life to travel around the world, get a master's, study under France's greatest pastry chef's, buy a house, start a business, etc. There's a lot you can do with three years and $100K. If you're going to invest it in a JD, do it because you plan to practice law, at least for a few years.
Vanderbilt 2010

queencruella

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4213
    • View Profile
Re: Career with a JD
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2006, 08:40:16 PM »
You can teach at the college level with a master's degree, but usually only in a junior college or in an adjunct capacity at a university.

I wouldn't go so far as to say that master's degree programs are useless- there are some fields that either require an extended bachelor's degree program or a master's degree (like architecture). There are other professional master's degrees that are quite useful for people who want to go into specific fields or advance their career in the field that they're currently in.