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Author Topic: I'm starting to have second thoughts.  (Read 530 times)

iSalute

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Re: I'm starting to have second thoughts.
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2006, 01:17:50 PM »
I guess my question is do lawyer enjoy their jobs? I enjoy being able to call myself an engineer, and at times enjoy what I do, but for the most part I am always stressed out (very high level of stress job :( and it most definitely affects my life. Since I have never worked as a lawyer, or even in a firm, I really have no idea what to expect. I love the thought of studying and practicing law. I would love being a patent litigator. I just would hate going from one boring stressful job to another.

O man, I am going to stop thinking about this now. I am just stressing myself out. Stess, yey for stress. Stesssssssssssssssssss
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Cube Farmer

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Re: I'm starting to have second thoughts.
« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2006, 01:26:41 PM »
I feel the same way as the earlier poster that said basically "If I don't do this, I will regret it for the rest of my life."  I have a very comfortable job as a Software Engineer, in a very comfortable town, good income, nice car, plenty of money in the bank.  My work-life balance is excellent.  So why am I considering a career in law?  I'm considering a career in law because every M-F morning, I wake up, drive to work, get to my cube and spend the next 8 hours watching the clock tick down so I can leave this boring job that I have no passion for.  I can't imagine what it would feel like after I've been doing this for 35 years...

The reason I relate my experience is to raise this question: All things financial aside, are you doing what you want to be doing in life? Are you happy going to work and doing the job that you're doing now, or do you see yourself more happy doing something else?  Put all financial matters aside and think of this honestly.  Will your kids' lives really be upset by the fact that you lacked for money for three years?  More so, would being a a job you dislike cause other reactions in your homelife that might be even worse?  Remember, you have a LOT of years left to work.  If you're not happy doing what you do, there's no better time to fix it....


This is my problem as well. I am a Technical Writer....woohooo. I have zero passion for this job, and cannot way for the day to end. As it is, I generally only work 32-35 hours a week, and I have also had so much more free-time. Giving all that up is not something that is appealing, but I have to come back to the fact that you only go around on this death-boat called Earth once. One thing to consider, however, is that most lawyers are not happy. With that said, I think it boils down to the fact that a lot kids go into law school right out of UG without really knowing what legal work entails. It seems to be a default field for a good many social science majors dreaming of the "big" paycheck at a prestigious firm. Do the research, and see it it makes sense, that is all there is to it.
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dbmuell

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Re: I'm starting to have second thoughts.
« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2006, 02:05:47 PM »
I think the whole "most lawyers are unhappy" is a class LSAT-style causal reasoning fallacy.  It seems to me (from reading this board and other interactions) that a large portion of people that go into law school in the first place are classic overachievers.  While being an overachiever can make you very successful, it usually comes with a psychological cornucopia that includes low self esteem, workaholism, type-A style stress, and a constant need to "be the best."  For many, I think the unhappiness was inevitable due to internal psychological factors- becoming a lawyer and trying to make the big bucks was an effect, not the cause, of this factors.

I, for one, am not in this for the money.  I know full well that I'm going to go into a pretty decent debt load and come out the other side probably making less than I do now.  For that, I could care less. If I'm making less money, driving a little less car and can find work in law that I enjoy, I'll take it!

Cube Farmer

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Re: I'm starting to have second thoughts.
« Reply #13 on: October 06, 2006, 02:11:38 PM »
I think the whole "most lawyers are unhappy" is a class LSAT-style causal reasoning fallacy.  It seems to me (from reading this board and other interactions) that a large portion of people that go into law school in the first place are classic overachievers.  While being an overachiever can make you very successful, it usually comes with a psychological cornucopia that includes low self esteem, workaholism, type-A style stress, and a constant need to "be the best."  For many, I think the unhappiness was inevitable due to internal psychological factors- becoming a lawyer and trying to make the big bucks was an effect, not the cause, of this factors.

I, for one, am not in this for the money.  I know full well that I'm going to go into a pretty decent debt load and come out the other side probably making less than I do now.  For that, I could care less. If I'm making less money, driving a little less car and can find work in law that I enjoy, I'll take it!

I maintain that for many people it is a default career choice and, of course, I aa making generalities. For this reason, and that being a lawyer is not like Law and Order, is why a good deal of attorneys are unhappy. Does this mean everyone fits into this category, of course not. I too recognize that I have the possibility of earning significantly less than I do now, as I have absolutely no interest in working in "BIGLAW."
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mjb

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Re: I'm starting to have second thoughts.
« Reply #14 on: October 06, 2006, 02:15:43 PM »
I think the whole "most lawyers are unhappy" is a class LSAT-style causal reasoning fallacy.  It seems to me (from reading this board and other interactions) that a large portion of people that go into law school in the first place are classic overachievers.  While being an overachiever can make you very successful, it usually comes with a psychological cornucopia that includes low self esteem, workaholism, type-A style stress, and a constant need to "be the best."  For many, I think the unhappiness was inevitable due to internal psychological factors- becoming a lawyer and trying to make the big bucks was an effect, not the cause, of this factors.

I, for one, am not in this for the money.  I know full well that I'm going to go into a pretty decent debt load and come out the other side probably making less than I do now.  For that, I could care less. If I'm making less money, driving a little less car and can find work in law that I enjoy, I'll take it!

I don't give much thought to the "most lawyers are unhappy statement". Before going to work in engineering I heard even worse things about engineering. They didnt ring true at all.

It is really hard to look in from the outside and have a good understanding fo what its really like
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jalong

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Re: I'm starting to have second thoughts.
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2006, 02:16:07 PM »
What it really comes down to this is this:

Do you love the law? Being dissatisfied with your job does not indicate that you ought to go to law school. If you're having second thoughts, why not put it off another year? If you think you are having second thoughts now, just think of the third and fourth thoughts you'll be having in the middle of the your first year. Quit, and you have debt but no law degree, stick with it, and even worse off. Take your time, this is a major life decision that does not need to be decided today.
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