Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Advice for future testers  (Read 1500 times)

Reach

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1166
    • View Profile
Advice for future testers
« on: October 05, 2006, 08:26:49 AM »
I know this thread might seem out of place because September takers are still waiting for their scores, but I think it might be good to do this while the test experience is still fresh in your hearts and minds.  If you could give a few words of advice to someone facing their own test experience, what would it be?

Mine would be to warm up a little the day of.  I spent the weekend (had the test on Monday) doing absolutely NOTHING test related and I didn't warm up at all on the day of the test.  I opened the booklet, saw LG (my worst) and kind of blanked my way through that first section.  I think if my mind had been nimble and ready I would have scored at least 2 points higher because I made some pathetic mistakes...ones so bad that they contradicted the rules set out by the conditions.

dbmuell

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Advice for future testers
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2006, 09:15:59 AM »
I guess most people probably know this (and I should have too but I got the timing wrong) but if you rely on a liquid stimulant (coffee, red bull, tea) to get you going in the morning, get up EARLY and have your beverage so that it has time to "run its course" before you're sitting in the test room.  I thought I got to it early enough but sure enough, during section 2, there it was.  Luckily for me, section 2 was really easy and I had 4 minutes to spare, which I used to sprint to the bathroom. If not for that, however, I would have been one hurting pup in section 3 :-)

Hey Now

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 197
  • This Is Why I'm Hot
    • View Profile
Re: Advice for future testers
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2006, 09:45:26 AM »
What threw me off the most was the hour long wait to sign everybody in, read through the instructions, and fill out the answer sheet...  I came in there very ready, but this sort of iced me.
Law School Yeah

Einstein

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1305
    • View Profile
Re: Advice for future testers
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2006, 09:51:37 AM »
Show up as late as you possibly can.. They say that you need to be there at 830 but at my test center they were still signing people by like 845.. and then the test didnt even start tiill like 930 cause the stupid people were soooo slow...

Just dont get there at like 810am or 815am.. Get there at 830am sharp... that way you wont have to wait so long for the exam..
Practice LSAT: 147(d), 150, 151,143,152, 156,161,163,161,160,157,163,158,162

University of San Diego School of Law!

seacotton

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 167
    • View Profile
Re: Advice for future testers
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2006, 10:12:39 AM »
The bathroom advice is really good.  I learned the hard way the first time.  The second time, I got hydrated the day before, had my last coffee or water at 615 the morning of, and went to the bathroom at 825.  I would also say ease up on the coffee; it is easy to get over hyped with all of the adrenaline.

Chandler Bing

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 653
    • View Profile
Re: Advice for future testers
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2006, 10:17:52 AM »
Do at least 1 practice test with 5 sections. I never did one, and I was completely checked out on my 5th section...I had to keep pinching myself to stay focused. The 5th section really is a stretch. I'm pretty sure I was able to get my usual amount of correct answers, but I don't know now, and that's causing me quite a bit of stress.
Monica (attending): Northwestern!
Rachel/Phoebe (still in the running): Northwestern $$, Chicago $
Janice(withdrawn): SLU, Loyola Chicago, Chicago-Kent, Depaul, UIUC, Duke, WUSTL

Cycle's over!

lindseyl

  • Guest
Re: Advice for future testers
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2006, 10:46:19 AM »
I disagree with a couple of the previous posts, but I really think all of this is just a preference thing. You can probably figure out your preferences by doing a complete test run a week or two before the exam. Schedule your start time for 930, run through 5 sections, with a 10-minute break.

I did not look at any test material at all for the 3 days leading up to the test. I did not want to burn myself out, and three months preptime is not going to be lost in the three days prior.

Relax.

I know they say no iPods, but I took mine before the exam (put it in my car right before I walked into the testing room), and used it to block everyone else out (a lot of pre-test nervous chatter).

Take a timer or a watch to monitor the time yourself.

Breathe.

Don't forget a snack for breaktime.

prajna

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 158
    • View Profile
Re: Advice for future testers
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2006, 11:08:46 AM »
try to get yourself really nervous for some preptests. i don't care what you have to do, pretend it's real, go to the test center, commute a long way to some random place, make it feel like test day. go to a place with annoying noises. during sections, concentrate and make yourself aware and annoyed of those noises (other people's pencils, distant doors opening/shutting, pages turning, people breathing...). if you can, record yourself underlining very loudly with a pencil and play it loudly while taking a test (this bothered me so much in RC). when you are totally ready and anxious, start the test with reading comp and give yourself 30 minutes (i basically spent 5 minutes during the real test freaking out, rereading, and freaking out that i'm freaking out).

Einstein

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1305
    • View Profile
Re: Advice for future testers
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2006, 11:12:19 AM »
(i basically spent 5 minutes during the real test freaking out, rereading, and freaking out that i'm freaking out).
This is why they say to expect 2-3 points lower than your PT average.
Practice LSAT: 147(d), 150, 151,143,152, 156,161,163,161,160,157,163,158,162

University of San Diego School of Law!

sladkaya

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 445
  • Not born in Texas, but got here as soon as I could
    • View Profile
Re: Advice for future testers
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2006, 12:20:19 PM »
Good thread.  My advice:

If you are, at the time of your diagnostic, at least 10 points removed from where you want to score, do at least 10-15 prep tests, 5 sections each, in realistic test conditions (not on your couch at home).  Dedicate 3-4 days a week to preparation.  I did drills on my weaker section twice a week, a drill on one of the stronger two sections once a week, and a prep test every Saturday at 9.30 a.m.

Have a system of attack for the LSAT - know where you tend to go wrong and fix it.  When I started my prep this year I ran out of time on LR by over-analyzing easier questions at the beginning and running out of time on lengthy but easy 24-26, losing free points.  So I set time limits:  First 14 questions in under 15 minutes, then switch to questions 20-26, do them in 10 minutes, then go back to 15-20 and do them in 10 minutes.

On logic games and RC I did passages/games out of order, starting with the one with the most questions. For me, games set-up and RC reading/underlining is what took the most time, not answering the questions. If something stumps you and you have to rush at the end, wouldn't you rather rush through 5 questions instead of 8?  Worked out pretty well on September's test, where I did the science passage second and rushed through the 5-question Mexican-American passage at the end, still finishing in time.

On games, if you're not getting a deduction/can't understand the set-up, go straight to the "if...then" questions and do them first.  They may help you understand the game more by limiting the conditions.  Also, answer global "must be true/false" questions early on, to make sure you're not missing a crucial deduction.  In global "must be questions," only one answer is necessarily right, and you can incorporate it into the main setup.  Just don't confuse them with "if X is first, what must be true" type questions - those are situation-specific.  Get logic games bible and review sections on numerical distribution/limited options - I've neglected those the first time around, and they make a difference between missing 3-4 questions and missing none.

On reading comprehension, in addition to doing passages out of order, read the SuperPrep RC section and apply their techniques.  I personally found the RC passages (but not so much the questions) in Kaplan180 very helpful, as they are very dense and similar to RC of the past few tests.  Remember that all the answers are in the passage, and don't be afraid to go back and re-read if you're stuck between two tempting answers.

I also took a Powerscore weekend course two weeks before the LSAT and it was helpful - I got 2 or 3 great LR tips, and it's good to see someone else work out the toughest games in front of you - diagrams, deductions, all that stuff.  But the most helpful part of the course was the homework - LR/RC/LG drills by question/passage/game type.  It was the perfect review two weeks prior to the test, when I've been concentrating on full-length practice tests for about a month and needed a refresher.
Accepted: Michigan($$), Northwestern($$$), Vanderbilt($$$), UCLA($$), UT($$$), WUSTL($$$), UIUC($$$$), Notre Dame($$),

Attending: TEXAS !!!

http://www.lawschoolnumbers.com/display.php?user=sladkaya