Law School Discussion

for those that have started law school

aerynn

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Re: for those that have started law school
« Reply #380 on: February 17, 2007, 08:47:47 AM »
wusses

And to think some people didn't realize you were red.

And to think some people still believe in the single red theory (the magic red theory to conspiracy theorists).

and to think they still don't realize you were actually red. all along.

I don't think she was red.  I don't think anyone was red.  It was all just a construct.  ;)

Re: for those that have started law school
« Reply #381 on: February 17, 2007, 09:31:21 AM »
i haven't heard one person say anything positive about law school.  not once since september.  that's pretty crazy.

I don't think it's as bad as it's made out to be (e.g. the suffocating workload -- largely imagined, or else unnecessarily self-imposed).

Okay, that's not quite positive.

Um, if it turns out that I like being a lawyer, then I will be glad I attended law school, since it's, you know, a necessary precondition.

Granted, that's conditional and perhaps unlikely to come true.

But then, even before law school I didn't expect to like it.  I just couldn't think of anything better to do.  So . . .


yeah, that's not exactly a cheery thumbs-up now, is it?

here's a question: is the following, generally speaking, true?

1. if you found the class easy, then you'll bomb the exam relative to your expectations and your other grades
2. if you found the class moderately challenging, you'll ace the exam
3. if you found the class quite difficult, you'll hit the median
3. if you

replace the word "class" with "exam" and I'd say there'd be some truth to it.

fuwaf

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Re: for those that have started law school
« Reply #382 on: February 17, 2007, 09:58:44 AM »
For me it was:

Easiest/most worthless/never paid attention class (I did study hard for the final): A+
Not so easy/most interesting class: A-
Seemed easy at the time/not so easy exam: A- (but lower than the other A-)
Hardest class/had no idea what was going on half the time: A-

Hmm... maybe this really shows nothing.  There was only a variance of .6 between the highest and lowest.  Maybe it would mean more if I said that my grade in the hardest class was the 3rd highest grade, my grade in the easiest class was the highest, and my grade in the second easiest was 6th.  That probably shows nothing as well, except maybe that I'm a showoff. :D

Re: for those that have started law school
« Reply #383 on: February 17, 2007, 12:48:18 PM »

My most difficult class had an optional discussion section with a 3L who'd aced the class when he took it.  Made all the difference in the world on the exam.

ETA: I hope this is different at other schools, but at mine the difference between the A+ exam and slightly lower grades was all about wordcount.  The more you could regurgitate, the better your grade.  Once you hit all the substantive issues in an organized way, you just needed to fill up space. 

the 3L thing sounds like a great idea.  i wonder if there were people who didn't opt in?

the word-count thing verges on the barmy.

At many schools, discussion sections are limited to people who the school has determined need the help the most. At my school they used to be open to everyone, but because one was so popular they changed it to invite-only based on "need." The school also used to have graded practice exams, but it got rid of that this year too.

As for the length issue, most of my profs use word counts so that is not the case here at all.

aerynn

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Re: for those that have started law school
« Reply #384 on: February 17, 2007, 01:09:18 PM »
1. At my school we have discussion sessions with 2L or 3Ls who got As in the class for each class.  Anyone can come.  Most don't, because it is hard to follow if you are behind in the reading and nearly everyone is at this point.

2. My exams had either time or space constraints such that there just wasn't the time or space to say everything you needed to.  I had a list of issues I spotted that I didn't have room to discuss.

3. Organization does count.  One professor said that he gave points to people who targeted the important issues first, rather than those who just wrote what occurred to them as they spotted the issues.  Pretty nice trick on a timed exam.

4. I don't think anyone got marked off for saying extra stuff.  The time it takes to write more words but convey less information comes out elsewhere though: either you have wasted limited time or limited space discussing one issue when a more precise person could discuss two.

5. Legal writing, for us, is an exercise is being brief and precise.

6. This semester sucks for a number of reasons: classes are harder for me, two of my professors are not as good as last semester, legal writing has gotten to be a bigger workload, moot court tryouts were a bitter, heart-breaking disappointment for everyone who didn't make it, especially since they are a LOT of work to prepare for, interviews create stress and foster competitiveness, constant rejection in terms of not getting interviews or not getting the job when other classmates are, the utter randomness of everything: two people applied to the same jobs and one got an interview with Employer A and the other got and interview with Employer B, but there doesn't seem any reason why A rejected one person and B rejected the other.  Grades were also so random: random to the effort expended, random to the feeling walking out of the exam, random to the degree to which it seems like you grasp the material. 

aerynn

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Re: for those that have started law school
« Reply #385 on: February 17, 2007, 01:14:13 PM »
Thanks for the info.  I'll have to pay attention to what my own professors want.   >:(

It is like trying to use Nostradamus's quatrains to predict the future.  Stuff makes sense after and you can say, "Oh okay, that's what he meant," but it is very tough to  use it as a guide to future information.

Maybe I only feel this way because my professors posted sample exams but NO SAMPLE ANSWERS!  Arg, I cannot tell you how frustrating that is.

Thistle

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Re: for those that have started law school
« Reply #386 on: February 17, 2007, 01:22:14 PM »
I think it really depends on the professor. A couple of my professors were pretty clear that they preferred concise exams, and it shows in the sample exams that are posted.

My grades were somewhere between median and top third for all of my classes except one (which was my least favorite in terms of subject matter, but my best grade)...the only person I compared grades with had very similar grades. He wrote substantially more than me on all of the exams, and I did (sometimes very) slightly better than him.


i had a professor who said, "i gave you a b because you only wrote 3300 words.  no a paper writes less than 5000 words."

ok fine.  i'll just write "@#!* you" 850 times.  :P

aerynn

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Re: for those that have started law school
« Reply #387 on: February 17, 2007, 01:27:09 PM »
Maybe I only feel this way because my professors posted sample exams but NO SAMPLE ANSWERS!  Arg, I cannot tell you how frustrating that is.

That's so awful it's funny.

One professor posted a list of questions that a good answer would address.  The single spaced list of questions took 4 pages.

We had 4 pages to address the questions, double space.   >:(

Re: for those that have started law school
« Reply #388 on: February 17, 2007, 01:28:17 PM »
1. At my school we have discussion sessions with 2L or 3Ls who got As in the class for each class.  Anyone can come.  Most don't, because it is hard to follow if you are behind in the reading and nearly everyone is at this point.


6. This semester sucks for a number of reasons: classes are harder for me, two of my professors are not as good as last semester, legal writing has gotten to be a bigger workload, moot court tryouts were a bitter, heart-breaking disappointment for everyone who didn't make it, especially since they are a LOT of work to prepare for, interviews create stress and foster competitiveness, constant rejection in terms of not getting interviews or not getting the job when other classmates are, the utter randomness of everything: two people applied to the same jobs and one got an interview with Employer A and the other got and interview with Employer B, but there doesn't seem any reason why A rejected one person and B rejected the other.  Grades were also so random: random to the effort expended, random to the feeling walking out of the exam, random to the degree to which it seems like you grasp the material. 

That's great that you have review sessions open to everyone. Most people tend to keep up at my school, but I think of those that were in last semester only the ones who did reasonably well stayed in.

I'm having the same semester with regards to professors. I have one repeat from last semester that everyone loves, but otherwise most people seem to be really struggling with the material. We have no curve so it's impossible to really know how well we did with regards to the rest of the class. I've heard so many speculations about the median that I can't even begin to estimate where I might fall in the class. People are panicking about finding jobs because our grades are typically so much lower than the grades at our similarly ranked counterparts.

Thistle

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Re: for those that have started law school
« Reply #389 on: February 17, 2007, 01:32:29 PM »
i had a professor who said, "i gave you a b because you only wrote 3300 words.  no a paper writes less than 5000 words."

did you yell at him?  i would have.


no, just asked him if he would publish his price list