Law School Discussion

LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)

gaup

Re: LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)
« Reply #170 on: October 09, 2006, 05:42:28 PM »
Root Hog

I absolutely agree with you on the shoppers question.  It said 'comparable items' not 'comparable number of items.'  So, the correct answer has to be the one about the listless buyers overbuying.

There was definitely no "comparable number of items" as some of you have said. The answer is the people without a shopping list buy /whatever/ items on sale and so end up spending more. I went through this question 3-4 times and remember this answer choice as being too common-sensical/obvious and so could be wrong but after careful evaluating all other choices found no better answer.

Re: LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)
« Reply #171 on: October 09, 2006, 07:27:03 PM »
the unnecessary items one is wrong. first of all, it doesn't matter how many unncessary items they bought-- it could have all been nescessary items on sale, and they still could have spent less. the pricing question is the one that resolves the paradox. end of story.

Re: LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)
« Reply #172 on: October 09, 2006, 07:32:56 PM »
that is not the end of the story...what if the list users had only sale items on their list?  that is a distinct possibility and only the unnecessary items answer choice can resolve it

Re: LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)
« Reply #173 on: October 09, 2006, 07:36:16 PM »
the unnecessary items one is wrong. first of all, it doesn't matter how many unncessary items they bought-- it could have all been nescessary items on sale, and they still could have spent less. the pricing question is the one that resolves the paradox. end of story.

By your logic, "only expensive items are on sale" is incorrect also, due to the possibility that sale prices being incredibly low led to said shoppers spending less. I'm not arguing for either, but resolve the paradox questions ask for which BEST resolves the paradox, not which one COMPLETELY resolves the paradox. Inclusions of possibilities does not necessarily weaken an answer.

And please, just because YOU think an answer is correct does NOT mean it's correct. Instead of waltzing into every thread and declaring that the problem in question can no longer be discussed due to your "correct" response, especially with your logic, only makes you look like a fool.

Re: LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)
« Reply #174 on: October 09, 2006, 07:43:45 PM »
the unnecessary items one is wrong. first of all, it doesn't matter how many unncessary items they bought-- it could have all been nescessary items on sale, and they still could have spent less. the pricing question is the one that resolves the paradox. end of story.

By your logic, "only expensive items are on sale" is incorrect also, due to the possibility that sale prices being incredibly low led to said shoppers spending less. I'm not arguing for either, but resolve the paradox questions ask for which BEST resolves the paradox, not which one COMPLETELY resolves the paradox. Inclusions of possibilities does not necessarily weaken an answer.

And please, just because YOU think an answer is correct does NOT mean it's correct. Instead of waltzing into every thread and declaring that the problem in question can no longer be discussed due to your "correct" response, especially with your logic, only makes you look like a fool.

sorry, sunny, but no one is waltzing onto threads here. i've been a part of all of them, and i've been arguing this one from the start. it's not just me either, who is positive that they bought similar amounts of items, or that the amount of "unnecessary" items doesn't do much to the argument. the prices one resolves it *best*. you can disagree, that's your perogative.

orangie

  • ****
  • 2920
  • GULC '10
    • View Profile
Re: LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)
« Reply #175 on: October 10, 2006, 06:39:23 AM »
just remembered a random question (could be experimental, though).  Scientist says that they did an experiment with some assumption, and the monkeys is the experiment must have known the assumption (or it must have been true) because the result was exactly as they predicted. The other one says (weaken?) that it's bull because ATMs do exactly as we expect them to, but it doesn't mean that they are aware of our assumptions...

Re: LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)
« Reply #176 on: October 10, 2006, 06:49:17 AM »
wow i wish that had been on my test. i like monkeys. but i fear that was experimental...

Re: LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)
« Reply #177 on: October 10, 2006, 08:34:56 AM »
wow i wish that had been on my test. i like monkeys. but i fear that was experimental...

I had experimental and don't remember it.

I do, however, remember the shopping list question and am pretty confident the "overbuying" option was correct. I don't remember it stipulating that the number of items was the same. How would that lead ANYONE to pick the "overbuying" option, and to remember they picked it and argue staunchly for it? It wouldn't.

But beyond there not being a similar number of items stipulated to, the sale choice JUST PLAIN SUCKS.

The sale items were the most expensive items to begin with?!?!?!?!?!

What's the difference between a candy bar that was originally 85 cents and another one that was orginially 4,865,375 dollars if they are both being sold NOW for 5 cents?

I don't understand some people.

Re: LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)
« Reply #178 on: October 10, 2006, 08:56:44 AM »
For number 10, I just remember the girl who needs to catch the bus is named Christine.  Can't remember anything else, just her $%$#% name.  sigh. 

Re: LR Master List - Sept 06 Post Mortem (49/50, more detailed version)
« Reply #179 on: October 10, 2006, 10:07:09 AM »
wow i wish that had been on my test. i like monkeys. but i fear that was experimental...

I had experimental and don't remember it.

I do, however, remember the shopping list question and am pretty confident the "overbuying" option was correct. I don't remember it stipulating that the number of items was the same. How would that lead ANYONE to pick the "overbuying" option, and to remember they picked it and argue staunchly for it? It wouldn't.

But beyond there not being a similar number of items stipulated to, the sale choice JUST PLAIN SUCKS.

The sale items were the most expensive items to begin with?!?!?!?!?!

What's the difference between a candy bar that was originally 85 cents and another one that was orginially 4,865,375 dollars if they are both being sold NOW for 5 cents?

I don't understand some people.

dudes-- it was worded trickily. i, along with everyone else who saw that wording, had to go back to check it and caught it only before we were able to knock the unnecessary items option. i had been debating between the two, and when i saw that wording, i knew which one was correct. as i've said before, what does "comparable items" even mean? they are the same quality? the same price? also, what difference does the amount of unncessary items have to do with anything? as i've said before, the non-listers could have bought *all* unnecessary stuff, and if you concede that the prices were low, still could have spent less. by saying that the most expensive stuff is the stuff on sale to begin with, it states that even though the items are on sale, they could indeed cost more than usual-- hence, spending more.