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Author Topic: "personal experience"  (Read 7409 times)

auto208562

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Re: "personal experience"
« Reply #50 on: February 26, 2004, 11:25:37 AM »
i think kslaw had a viable solution several posts back;  if somehow affirmative action can be tied into not only race, but also economic or demographic factors. 

i agree that probably the people benefiting affirmative action are not the ones that need it.  As kslaw said, they are probably the middle class or higher class which are in the same situation as their "white" counterparts.  Had the same education.  Had the same opportunities growing up.  and being so, is the inherent flaw which kslaw is talking about.


dnw2007

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Re: "personal experience"
« Reply #51 on: February 26, 2004, 11:45:06 AM »
Doesn't the government have a history of supporting discrimination against minorities?  If this is true, why shouldn't the government take part in cleaning up the mess that it sponsored?

romancingthestone

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Re: "personal experience"
« Reply #52 on: February 26, 2004, 01:40:58 PM »
that's kind of my point, anon.  we can't just say, it should be treated as a class issue.  it's not classism, it's racism.  the two things overlap, but they are different.  People of color experience racism regardless of their class.  Both white and people of color may experience classism based on their socio-economic background.  They are distinct problems that require distinct responses.  I may know what it's like to grow up poor, but I'll never know what it's like to grow up black. 

jgruber

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Re: "personal experience"
« Reply #53 on: March 05, 2004, 04:03:08 PM »
I'm a white male and not a youngster.  I know that many of my opportunities came to be more readily because of my gender and color.  Some things were easier for me and some things were possible only because I am a whitle male.

When I find myself at a disadvantage because of affirmative action or similar programs, how can I complain?  I can't and won't, because I was raised to expect things to be fair and I've had more than my share of the breaks.

Ooops.  Where did I leave my soapbox?  Has anyone seen it?   ;)

march hare

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Re: "personal experience"
« Reply #54 on: March 05, 2004, 06:12:10 PM »
"I have plenty of empathy for the way people were treated hundreds of years ago; but those people are not alive anymore.  Why should there great great great grandchildren be rewarded for the abuse they undertook.  All races of humans were abused some time in history so we should all be given the same opportunities."

Affirmative action is not an apologetic way of making up for what happened hundreds of years ago.  It is an attempt to eradicate some of the discriminatory practices of today.

As per race being counted into an index score;  race is no more an unfair advantage than the points granted for going to an expensive undergrad funded by parents, or being a legacy student, or having a neurologist for a dad, or hitting a top LSAT score after taking a couple hundred dollars worth of prep classes.  It is just another index point added into the score.  As with all index points, some students will get them, and some won't.

lawstudent2004

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Re: "personal experience"
« Reply #55 on: March 05, 2004, 09:59:32 PM »
As for the high LSAT score those people actually earned the score, it was not given to them by their parents like race or an expensive education.

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Re: "personal experience"
« Reply #56 on: March 06, 2004, 01:24:58 AM »
That's exactly what I posted, but before I had achance to send it something happened to my keyboard (some wayward keystroke or something) and I lost it before I could reply...
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march hare

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Re: "personal experience"
« Reply #57 on: March 06, 2004, 09:43:21 AM »
"As for the high LSAT score those people actually earned the score, it was not given to them by their parents like race or an expensive education."

Race is a social construct, not something "given" to you by your parents. 

LSAT scores are earned, as well as GPAs.  However, if a student (or their parents) cannot afford to go to a top undergrad college, nor pay for LSAT prep courses, those index points will be effected.

lawstudent2004

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Re: "personal experience"
« Reply #58 on: March 07, 2004, 04:05:00 PM »
I am not a minority and surprisingly could not afford a LSAT prep course or a private school.  I attended a junior college for my core subjects and went to a local state school for my degree.  I purchased a $20 study book for the LSAT.

nathanielmark

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Re: "personal experience"
« Reply #59 on: March 09, 2004, 01:19:50 PM »
Im surprised noone has brought up the affirmative action for the wealthy and politically powerful.

children whos parents are alums at a given college have a much greater chance of gaining admission to that school then someone else.  This obviously discriminates against people from working class backgrounds whos parents never went to school.  A perfect example of this would be the obviously not so bright George W. Bush gaining admission to Yale, and later Harvard Business School (after gettings Cs as an undergrad).

similarly, notice the more expensive private schools will land grads higher paying jobs then higher ranked more affordable public schools in the same locations.  Why could that be?

there is much more discrimination against minorities and (more importantly) those from working class/lower class backgrounds.  Until these discrepencies have been resolved, affirmative action should be off the table.  at least it gives some people a chance, it would be better if based on income level though and not race.