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Author Topic: Please explain a non-ABA school status  (Read 6487 times)

jgruber

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Re: Please explain a non-ABA school status
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2004, 10:25:39 AM »
I have applied to Nashville School of Law.  It is not an ABA approved school and from what they say they don't want ABA approval.

They say that you can sit for the bar exam upon graduation and a number of their graduates have been admitted to the bar.

I chose NSL because they're program is geared exclusively to part-time students, full time working people.

The other advantage to NSL is the low tuition, approximately $4,000 per year for a four year program.

Since I have to work to support myself and spouse and NSL is the closest school, it seemed a natural combination for me. 

I just took the LSAT in February and am on pins and needles waiting for the score.

Can I get a big fat 'aaaaawwwwwwwhhhhhh'?

lawschoolafterdark

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Re: Please explain a non-ABA school status
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2004, 06:05:55 PM »
The biggest differences between ABA and non-ABA schools are the numbers and limitations on where you can practice.

LSAT scores, Bar pass rates, tuition costs. All are typically higher at ABA schools.

If you attend a non-ABA school as I do, you have to have a realistic view of what you want to do after law school.  You will not be interviewing with the big firms.  That does not mean you will not have a rewarding career and possibly make good money.And you will probably need to plan to stay in state for your practice.  Although, many states will let you sit for their bar after 5-7 years of practice in good standing in your home state. Before deciding on an ABA school you have to be on board with it 100%.

Never bank on a school that says they are working on ABA status.  There are no sure bets.  Some schools have been trying for 10 years and have not made it.

Transfers are really not an option. In the rare case you may pull it off but if you are that rare of a case you probably should only apply to ABA schools if that is important to you.

Visit www.lawschoolafterdark.com

jgruber

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Re: Please explain a non-ABA school status
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2004, 02:06:44 PM »
A side note


Never bank on a school that says they are working on ABA status.  There are no sure bets.  Some schools have been trying for 10 years and have not made it.


Nashville School of Law, which dates back to 1911, says they have never tried to get ABA approval.