Law School Discussion

Texas schools = low employment rates???

Texas schools = low employment rates???
« on: February 11, 2004, 03:02:34 AM »
Does anyone know why a number of the law schools in Texas (e.g. UH, St. Mary's, Texas Tech, South Texas, etc.)  have such low employment-upon-graduation rates?

The only tier 1 school in all of TX is U. of TX...so I don't get it.  Who are all the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th tier school graduates competing against?

Thanks!!

Re: Texas schools = low employment rates???
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2004, 05:40:46 AM »
Actually, most people consider University of Houston a tier one school.  Don't worry so much about the "employment-upon-graduation rates."  I am friends with a woman who, upon graduation at UH, had a job with an energy company starting at 98,000/year and had free health insurence, pension plan, etc. 

The University of Houston Law Center is well-known for its Health Law and Intellectual Property Law programs.  UH is number one in the nation for Health Law and in the top ten in the nation for IP Law.  UH, also, has a Texas Innocence Network which allows students to invesigate the case(s) of "inmates who have persuasive claims of actual innocence."  [I got the quote from the UH Law Center website]

The "employment-upon-graduation rates" are affected at many Texas schools because it is, generally, expected that the student will not just rely on school sources and search for jobs in his/her own time.


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I also know a man who attended STCL while clerking for a judge.  Many law firms will pay a new associate more if s/he has clerked for a judge.

Re: Texas schools = low employment rates???
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2004, 11:29:33 AM »
Most people consider Southern Methodist University (SMU) to be a "Tier 1" school as well.  And Baylor University is on the "Tier 1/2" bubble.  Most of Texas' law schools are solid.  Just curious, where are getting your employment info from?  Law Services post the following employment rates:
Baylor Univ: 95%
SMU 91.4%
Texas Tech 98%
Univ of Houston 90%

And most of the other law schools in Texas seem to do okay.  STCL has an excellent Trial Advocay Program and St Mary's has a great International Law program!

Re: Texas schools = low employment rates???
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2004, 04:57:07 AM »
Actually, most people consider University of Houston a tier one school. 


OK, that part of your reply was basically ontopic. However....


Don't worry so much about the "employment-upon-graduation rates."  I am friends with a woman who, upon graduation at UH, had a job with an energy company starting at 98,000/year and had free health insurence, pension plan, etc. 


Ummm....I do not think your one anecdotal case offers anything in the way of evidence.....In fact, it definitely does not! It is basically a non sequitur.


The "employment-upon-graduation rates" are affected at many Texas schools because it is, generally, expected that the student will not just rely on school sources and search for jobs in his/her own time.


Umm...you wrote, "The 'employment-upon-graduation rates' are affected at many Texas schools," but that had nothing to do with what you wrote just afterwards: "because it is, generally, expected that the student will not just rely on school sources and search for jobs in his/her own time."  Yet those 2 clauses were part of the same sentence! ???  Yikes, are you ever gonna have a lot of "fun" at law school!   :D  BTW, you also need to have a really good review of the basic punctuation rules.....
 
Anyway, to address the original question about why grads of Texas law schools seem to have trouble finding a job.  From here on the ground in Houston, it is looking like a disaster area when it comes to the job market. I am working right now for $10/hour, doing crap temp work, and I am working in a huge room filled with dozens of lawyers and engineers, etc., all doing the same crap work.  Just not many jobs here in Houston, or in Texas. Texas in general may be exemplified by the Enron scandal--a lot of our stats are cooked. It may finally be catching up with  us.  Our school success rate statistics have finally been exposed, and doubtlessly many other stats have been faked.

It seems that the paper tiger of the Texas economy is being shredded by a downgrade in its professional reputation: The Enron fallout, the fake school success stats, etc. Also, Texas is a major sink for immigration, which has flooded the job market, although that does not affect lawyers much, although it certainly has affected the job market for technical people.

To digress, the problem of "cooked" statistics is an endemic phenomenon here in America.  For example, the "decrease in the crime rate" statistical phenomenon, which is basically a bogus stat: what has happened is that cops, police chiefs, police depts, etc., have been "disappearing" low-profile crimes. They just never get reported. You say you got mugged? Nope, never happened. Car burglarized? No, that crime was never written up....etc etc.


camelbx

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Re: Texas schools = low employment rates???
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2004, 12:57:17 PM »
*pokes cryofan*

Can I cross your flaming bridge Mr. Troll?

dta

Re: Texas schools = low employment rates???
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2004, 09:41:18 PM »
Does anyone know why a number of the law schools in Texas (e.g. UH, St. Mary's, Texas Tech, South Texas, etc.)  have such low employment-upon-graduation rates?

The only tier 1 school in all of TX is U. of TX...so I don't get it.  Who are all the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th tier school graduates competing against?

Thanks!!

Well, with regard to UH I'm not sure what you're referring to. Here are UH stats:

Pass rate for first time Bar Exam takers: 90%
Placement rate: 90%
Students employed upon graduation: 75%
Students employed in 3 months: 86%
Average starting salary: $74,755

Do you consider 86% bad? Also, I think for any Texas school if you graduate in the top quarter you're gonna get a job you'll be happy with.

ruskiegirl

Re: Texas schools = low employment rates???
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2004, 09:27:46 PM »
Actually, most people consider University of Houston a tier one school.

Houston is a solid T2 and is consistently ranked below Baylor and SMU.  Baylor has been flirting with T1 status for some time.  It is usally ranked just a few spots below the T1 cut-off.  (The 2004 rankings have it at 51.) SMU was T1 in 04.


Esq

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Re: Texas schools = low employment rates???
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2005, 08:25:32 AM »
Here are some 2004 figures for 23 of the 25 largest law firms in Texas and the law school affiliations of their 2004 associates...

University of Texas Law School 102
University of Houston Law Center 49
SMU Dedman School of Law 42
Baylor University School of Law 15
South Texas School of Law 12
University of Virginia School of Law 12
Harvard Law School 11
Georgetown University Law Center 10
Vanderbilt University Law School 10
Tulane Law School 9
Duke University School of Law 8
St. Mary's University School of Law 8
Texas Tech University School of Law 8
University of Michigan Law School 7
University of Chicago Law School 6
Columbia Law School 5
Notre Dame Law School 4
Stanford Law School 4