Law School Discussion

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #50 on: September 17, 2006, 12:20:35 PM »
So even if he works a lot of hours for a few years, does it mean that he'll never have time for social life? That sounds absurd. I think he's more mature in that he understands that first you need to invest your time and energy into getting a career and then you can finally relax and enjoy life. He certainly sounds more mature than your typical frat brother who thinks that college is all about getting drunk and then later on in his life he may start thinking about his career.

He sounds like the driven type.  Go from junior associate to senior associate, and from senior associate to partner.  The demands of the job do not decrease.  Partners work AT LEAST as many hours as associates.  If you don't know this stuff, you should.

Exactly.  Anyone on a professional track will tell you to enjoy college, because it's definitely the best days of your life in terms of freedom to @#!* around.  Once you start a career, you're off the '@#!* around' track until retirement.  Your social life as a lawyer is definitely not the same as a college or 'non-professional' employee social life.
I'd still rather be a wealthy young lawyer than a washed up college student who decides to work on his career in his 30's. But i suppose it's all a matter of preferences.

pikey

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #51 on: September 17, 2006, 12:23:01 PM »
So even if he works a lot of hours for a few years, does it mean that he'll never have time for social life? That sounds absurd. I think he's more mature in that he understands that first you need to invest your time and energy into getting a career and then you can finally relax and enjoy life. He certainly sounds more mature than your typical frat brother who thinks that college is all about getting drunk and then later on in his life he may start thinking about his career.

He sounds like the driven type.  Go from junior associate to senior associate, and from senior associate to partner.  The demands of the job do not decrease.  Partners work AT LEAST as many hours as associates.  If you don't know this stuff, you should.

Exactly.  Anyone on a professional track will tell you to enjoy college, because it's definitely the best days of your life in terms of freedom to @#!* around.  Once you start a career, you're off the '@#!* around' track until retirement.  Your social life as a lawyer is definitely not the same as a college or 'non-professional' employee social life.
I'd still rather be a wealthy young lawyer than a washed up college student who decides to work on his career in his 30's. But i suppose it's all a matter of preferences.

We're advising him to take a year or two off, not a decade!  He won't exactly be washed up at 20 (or at least I hope not).

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #52 on: September 17, 2006, 12:25:56 PM »
So even if he works a lot of hours for a few years, does it mean that he'll never have time for social life? That sounds absurd. I think he's more mature in that he understands that first you need to invest your time and energy into getting a career and then you can finally relax and enjoy life. He certainly sounds more mature than your typical frat brother who thinks that college is all about getting drunk and then later on in his life he may start thinking about his career.

He sounds like the driven type.  Go from junior associate to senior associate, and from senior associate to partner.  The demands of the job do not decrease.  Partners work AT LEAST as many hours as associates.  If you don't know this stuff, you should.

Exactly.  Anyone on a professional track will tell you to enjoy college, because it's definitely the best days of your life in terms of freedom to @#!* around.  Once you start a career, you're off the '@#!* around' track until retirement.  Your social life as a lawyer is definitely not the same as a college or 'non-professional' employee social life.
I'd still rather be a wealthy young lawyer than a washed up college student who decides to work on his career in his 30's. But i suppose it's all a matter of preferences.

We're advising him to take a year or two off, not a decade!  He won't exactly be washed up at 20 (or at least I hope not).
Ok. But i just really don't see what he could do in 2 years that would be so fun and etc,  especially since he's graduating pretty soon. Seems like the funnest thing he can do is get a job. Maybe you guys are right in some respect, but i think it all comes down to personal preferences.

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #53 on: September 17, 2006, 12:38:37 PM »

Ok. But i just really don't see what he could do in 2 years that would be so fun and etc,  especially since he's graduating pretty soon. Seems like the funnest thing he can do is get a job. Maybe you guys are right in some respect, but i think it all comes down to personal preferences.

Travel.
I guess i'm just looking at it from my perspective and i ain't got no cash to travel. haha

mantis

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #54 on: September 17, 2006, 12:53:29 PM »
Fact is, in the end, only I know what I'm capable of. They seem to think I won't be able to have fun in law school. I will. They think I won't be able to have fun after. I will. And they think I will have fun working at a nowhere job out of the house. I won't.

It's not about your capabilities.  I don't doubt that you'll do very well on the LSAT and in law school etc. etc.  I just wonder if you're not sort of screwing yourself out of other opportunities, that's all.

Even though everyone seems to think 18 is too young, I'm just going to use that as motivation.

Again, I don't think anyone thinks 18 is "too young" because of an ability issue...

Plus, have any of you gone to clubs?

No idea what this has to do with anything.

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #55 on: September 17, 2006, 02:36:34 PM »
I'd advise the OP to go and do Teach For America or teach abroad for year or so-- get you out of the parents' house, new experiences and something to bring to your law school application and personal perspective. You can study for and take the LSAT during this time.

You work till you die-- and right now you're 18! A smart 18-- but young and it seems-- sheltered. Go outside your comfort zone and take some time to learn about what makes you tick outside of the parental controls. Go and travel, have some fun, do some volunteer work and open up your mind to the world outside of your parents' home. This experience may strengthen your resolve to go to law school and even help you decide just what you would do with a law degree, or it may lead you in another career path.

Ultimately, the choice is yours-- you're clearly a bright and driven person, but I think some time abroad or out in the world would be good for you and help you become more well-rounded-- something else to bring to the table as a law school applicant. Good luck!

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #56 on: September 17, 2006, 09:24:25 PM »
I'd advise the OP to go and do Teach For America or teach abroad for year or so-- get you out of the parents' house, new experiences and something to bring to your law school application and personal perspective. You can study for and take the LSAT during this time.

You work till you die-- and right now you're 18! A smart 18-- but young and it seems-- sheltered. Go outside your comfort zone and take some time to learn about what makes you tick outside of the parental controls. Go and travel, have some fun, do some volunteer work and open up your mind to the world outside of your parents' home. This experience may strengthen your resolve to go to law school and even help you decide just what you would do with a law degree, or it may lead you in another career path.

Ultimately, the choice is yours-- you're clearly a bright and driven person, but I think some time abroad or out in the world would be good for you and help you become more well-rounded-- something else to bring to the table as a law school applicant. Good luck!

I'll second the vote for TFA. It's a great program, its very rewarding, its good work experience, and it should completely alleviate any possible concerns about maturity that an adcomm might have. A great option.