Law School Discussion

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #40 on: September 17, 2006, 09:34:13 AM »
Wait three years.

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #41 on: September 17, 2006, 09:42:27 AM »
my opinion is that yes it may hurt you (very maybe).  but if this is what you want now, go for it.  if i had had the option of going to law school when i was 18, i would have done it.

mantis

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #42 on: September 17, 2006, 09:48:40 AM »
First off, I graduate at 18. My birthday is July 31. I started college at 14, and was homeschooled.

Why do I want to move fast? What can I do here. I live at home. That's just lame. I want to move out to start my life.

I'm surprised this thread is still going but since it is I'm going to stop resisting the urge to chime in...

"I live at home.  That's just lame." = True.  And also the worst reason to go to law school.  EVER.

I'm not in law school yet but if you and I were in the same class, I would just feel sad for you... Not in a pitying sort of way, just in a.. if you were my child I could never be happy knowing that you had felt this compulsion to excel and the result was that you missed out on something/anything as a result.

Take some time off!  Do something!  Get away from your parents and figure out what YOU want for yourself.  I know that I'm sort of unfairly implying that your parents have somehow brainwashed you or had you under their control or something, and I don't necessarily mean to do that.  I just think about how much I changed, my friends changed, random acquaintances changed... etc. since moving out of the house and being independent for a while.  Even if you just live around the corner and force yourself to limit contact a little, do your own laundry, make your own meals, have ice cream for breakfast one day a week, whatever.  It just seems like going to law school now would really limit your ability to experience young adulthood.

Not only that... but I worry less about how much your brain will or will not mature to ensure a satisfactory LSAT score and more about how much your brain will definitely mature/change as you realize that you made a (potentially expensive and potentially long-lasting) decision about your future at the ripe old age of 18.  I realize we're all different and maybe you really really DO know what you want to do with your life, but I know for me and most of the people I know, if we were stuck doing what we thought we wanted to do at 18 we would be incredibly unhappy.

Ah.  Feels good to get that out...

mantis

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #43 on: September 17, 2006, 11:12:55 AM »
Thanks for the advice. But let me try to explain myself. I live at home. And I do want to get out. However, that's not why I want to go to law school. It's why I want to go to law school NOW, as opposed to next year.

This still sounds like, "I want to go to law school so I can get out of the house," to me.  Deciding to go next year (or better yet, a couple years down the road) does not preclude you from moving out right now.

What you guys don't seem to understand is that I didn't major in accounting. My major is a graduate major. It's absolutely useless by itself. The best I could hope for would be putting college degree on my resume and getting an entry level office position.

Very few people who go to highly-ranked schools get degrees in "useful" majors like accounting.  There aren't many jobs on the market that are desperately seeking history majors.  The academic area of the bachelors degree is usually sort of pointless (which is why we're all going to law school) as far as getting a job.  That's why we have internships and entry-level positions.  I absolutely agree that you could go to law school and graduate and probably get a perfectly fine job as a junior associate or whatever somewhere.  However, I think working in those internships and entry-level positions also confers a kind of experience that you're missing out on if you go that route.

As for you pitying me... you wouldn't. I'm going to have fun in law school. Period. And why can't I @#!* around AFTER I get my JD? I'll still be young. I won't be missing out on anything.

I think I said explicitly that I wouldn't pity you... but ok, whatever.

Part of what I'm feeling is that you're sort of pushing yourself into a different social group by default.  You're completely fine to @#!* around after law school, true, but what makes you think your law school friends are going to want to do the same kind of f-ing around you are?  It seems likely that they're going to be in their mid- to late-twenties.. possibly ready to start taking things a little bit more seriously, having left all of their f-ing-around days behind them in undergrad.  Again, it's just speculation and I can't predict the future any more than you can, but it does seem like the potential for this kind of conflict is pretty high.

I would be experiencing adulthood in law school. I'd be living alone miles (hopefully hundreds ^^) away from my parents. I'd be doing laundry, cooking, etc. Again referring to my bro and sis, but that's why they did.

You keep referring to your brother and sister, and I have to say that I also find that a little disturbing.  Yes, it's what they did.  And they loved it and lived happily ever after.  But is it what YOU want to do.  How do you know?  How did they decide what to do?  Even if they're 100% happy now, is there anything that they regret?  Could you learn from their mistakes, if they made any?

Obviously you'll be fine whatever you do.  These are potentially life-altering decisions but they aren't life-ending decisions.  I would just encourage you to put a little bit more critical thought into it.  You obviously have plenty of time to do so.

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #44 on: September 17, 2006, 11:14:42 AM »
And how old are both of you? It's fun to play the hypothetical game, huh? This guy's a Philosophy major and you guys are the one's speculating about possible states of existence. Interesting. What do you guys know about what employers at firms think? I was under the impression that during law school you get good grades, you get summer internships, and then get hired when you graduate. You think the employers really care if you didn't work before law school? I would think they'd be more concerned with how well you know and can apply the law. That's just me though.

Furthermore, you think that somebody that has the drive to graduate at 18 can't work a lot of hours? What possible work experience even closely resembles that of lawyering? Furthermore, what kind of work experience is a Philosophy major going to get anyway? Flipping burgers? I'm sure that's going to look good to potential employers. Look at this guy...instead of going to law school straight out of UG he flipped burgers at Mickey D's. Let's hire him. Basically, this kid's got three options: go to graduate school, go to law school, or go work somewhere that ain't gonna pay him jack. You guys are giving him some pretty good advice. Yeah, just put off your ambitions kid. It's okay to put your life on hold so that you can go waste your time "growing up" or getting "life experiences", whatever the #$!& those terms mean.
Totally agree.

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #45 on: September 17, 2006, 11:16:59 AM »
I've got the feeling he was lying about his scores.

I just find this so strange because both my bro and sis were 18. My bro got 168 and was accepted to plenty of the top 14 (not top 4) and went to duke. My sis got a 172 and was accepted at columbia.

Honestly, just don't get it...
I've heard plenty of stories about young people getting into good schools. If you check columbia's chart of all admitted student, about 5 of them were under 21.

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #46 on: September 17, 2006, 11:22:35 AM »
As for you pitying me... you wouldn't. I'm going to have fun in law school. Period. And why can't I @#!* around AFTER I get my JD? I'll still be young. I won't be missing out on anything.

I think I said explicitly that I wouldn't pity you... but ok, whatever.

Part of what I'm feeling is that you're sort of pushing yourself into a different social group by default.  You're completely fine to @#!* around after law school, true, but what makes you think your law school friends are going to want to do the same kind of f-ing around you are?  It seems likely that they're going to be in their mid- to late-twenties.. possibly ready to start taking things a little bit more seriously, having left all of their f-ing-around days behind them in undergrad.  Again, it's just speculation and I can't predict the future any more than you can, but it does seem like the potential for this kind of conflict is pretty high.

In addition to the "having grown up" thing, there's the fact that junior associates work a lot of hours.  Just the fact that (s)he is asking "why can't I @#!* around AFTER I get my JD?" tells me that this person is not ready for law school.
So even if he works a lot of hours for a few years, does it mean that he'll never have time for social life? That sounds absurd. I think he's more mature in that he understands that first you need to invest your time and energy into getting a career and then you can finally relax and enjoy life. He certainly sounds more mature than your typical frat brother who thinks that college is all about getting drunk and then later on in his life he may start thinking about his career.

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #47 on: September 17, 2006, 11:25:16 AM »
And how old are both of you? It's fun to play the hypothetical game, huh? This guy's a Philosophy major and you guys are the one's speculating about possible states of existence. Interesting. What do you guys know about what employers at firms think? I was under the impression that during law school you get good grades, you get summer internships, and then get hired when you graduate. You think the employers really care if you didn't work before law school? I would think they'd be more concerned with how well you know and can apply the law. That's just me though.

Furthermore, you think that somebody that has the drive to graduate at 18 can't work a lot of hours? What possible work experience even closely resembles that of lawyering? Furthermore, what kind of work experience is a Philosophy major going to get anyway? Flipping burgers? I'm sure that's going to look good to potential employers. Look at this guy...instead of going to law school straight out of UG he flipped burgers at Mickey D's. Let's hire him. Basically, this kid's got three options: go to graduate school, go to law school, or go work somewhere that ain't gonna pay him jack. You guys are giving him some pretty good advice. Yeah, just put off your ambitions kid. It's okay to put your life on hold so that you can go waste your time "growing up" or getting "life experiences", whatever the #$!& those terms mean.

Totally agree.

You totally agree that philosophy majors can't get "better" or more "real/grown-up" jobs than flipping burgers at McDonald's?  Then you're retarded and your cosignage certainly doesn't strengthen the argument.
I was agreeing with the first part of the post. I was too lazy to read the rest of it. It's a f-ing forum. Furthermore, the example was a little extreme, and maybe if RC was your strength you'd get that. The point is that the kid won't earn any money and will waste his time "finding himself". If he is mature enough to find himself at a young age, he doesn't need any more soul searching. In fact if you're ambitious and excell at what you do at such a young age, you shouldn't be punished for being so bright.

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #48 on: September 17, 2006, 11:26:13 AM »
As for you pitying me... you wouldn't. I'm going to have fun in law school. Period. And why can't I @#!* around AFTER I get my JD? I'll still be young. I won't be missing out on anything.

I think I said explicitly that I wouldn't pity you... but ok, whatever.

Part of what I'm feeling is that you're sort of pushing yourself into a different social group by default.  You're completely fine to @#!* around after law school, true, but what makes you think your law school friends are going to want to do the same kind of f-ing around you are?  It seems likely that they're going to be in their mid- to late-twenties.. possibly ready to start taking things a little bit more seriously, having left all of their f-ing-around days behind them in undergrad.  Again, it's just speculation and I can't predict the future any more than you can, but it does seem like the potential for this kind of conflict is pretty high.

In addition to the "having grown up" thing, there's the fact that junior associates work a lot of hours.  Just the fact that (s)he is asking "why can't I @#!* around AFTER I get my JD?" tells me that this person is not ready for law school.

I'm getting the impression that the OP's parents are going to foot the bill so diving into working immediately may not be necessary. Nonetheless, I don't know who the OP will f*** around with since everyone finishing law school at the same time won't have that luxury of finding themselves after law school because they have loans to pay off.

pikey

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #49 on: September 17, 2006, 12:15:36 PM »
So even if he works a lot of hours for a few years, does it mean that he'll never have time for social life? That sounds absurd. I think he's more mature in that he understands that first you need to invest your time and energy into getting a career and then you can finally relax and enjoy life. He certainly sounds more mature than your typical frat brother who thinks that college is all about getting drunk and then later on in his life he may start thinking about his career.

He sounds like the driven type.  Go from junior associate to senior associate, and from senior associate to partner.  The demands of the job do not decrease.  Partners work AT LEAST as many hours as associates.  If you don't know this stuff, you should.

Exactly.  Anyone on a professional track will tell you to enjoy college, because it's definitely the best days of your life in terms of freedom to @#!* around.  Once you start a career, you're off the '@#!* around' track until retirement.  Your social life as a lawyer is definitely not the same as a college or 'non-professional' employee social life.