Law School Discussion

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TheCanadian

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2006, 02:10:25 PM »

I know the feeling of being the youngest...not only am I born later in the year (december...lsat day!) but all throughout highschool, because of excellerated courses and such, I was a year ahead than most of my peers. And In University the same usually applied (I skip intro courses if possible).

I see that those accelerated classes were not in spelling and grammar.
Meh...it's a forum...

TheCanadian

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2006, 02:14:18 PM »
Oh yeah, now I'm 6'2 210+, so I'm physically pretty mature (got some acne recently because of stress, but went to a doctor and have some stuff to clear it up now)

Actually, stress can be pretty much ruled out as a cause of acne.

sponger2004

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #12 on: September 16, 2006, 03:15:46 PM »
Hey buddy. Don't let all these naysayers get in your way of doing what you want to do. Notice that most people who are against your idea are the people who are older. Self-serving bias perhaps? Even if you don't go T-14, earning a J.D. at 22 is still going to be pretty impressive to potential employers. If you know you want a law degree, wasting time "finding yourself" is absurd.

pikey

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2006, 03:25:59 PM »
Hey buddy. Don't let all these naysayers get in your way of doing what you want to do. Notice that most people who are against your idea are the people who are older. Self-serving bias perhaps? Even if you don't go T-14, earning a J.D. at 22 is still going to be pretty impressive to potential employers. If you know you want a law degree, wasting time "finding yourself" is absurd.

I'm 21.  Not exactly over the hill yet.  And a 22 year old, no matter what degree, isn't exactly impressive to potential employers.  In that situation, your age will be a drawback, as employers value experience.  They'd take the 27 year old who worked on Wall Street for a few years over the 22 year old who's never done anything but attend school any day.  That's the way the 'real world' works.  The dot com days of 25 year old CEOs are long gone, and experience is increasingly more valuable.  This is why people have advised the OP to take some time off.  A little experience can go a long way, when it comes to finding a job after law school.

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #14 on: September 16, 2006, 03:33:18 PM »
Hey buddy. Don't let all these naysayers get in your way of doing what you want to do. Notice that most people who are against your idea are the people who are older. Self-serving bias perhaps? Even if you don't go T-14, earning a J.D. at 22 is still going to be pretty impressive to potential employers. If you know you want a law degree, wasting time "finding yourself" is absurd.

As an employer I don't know whether I'd be impressed with a 22-year-old graduate. There's a lot more to getting a job than just grades and the benefit to hiring people with more work experience is that the employer doesn't have to worry about keeping them behind the scenes as long to train them how to work with clients. Even a traditional student who is 22 is likely to have some work experience/internships under his/her belt that will be helpful during the interview process. I hesitate to guess what sort of work experience someone can get from ages 16-18.

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2006, 03:38:37 PM »
Hey buddy. Don't let all these naysayers get in your way of doing what you want to do. Notice that most people who are against your idea are the people who are older. Self-serving bias perhaps? Even if you don't go T-14, earning a J.D. at 22 is still going to be pretty impressive to potential employers. If you know you want a law degree, wasting time "finding yourself" is absurd.

You got me, it was my desire to keep him from competing against me (despite the fact that I seriously doubt that we're looking at any of the same schools) that led me to advise him to take a year to add work experience and give himself some more time to prep for the LSAT. Your logic is infallible, good sir.

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2006, 03:40:42 PM »
Hey buddy. Don't let all these naysayers get in your way of doing what you want to do. Notice that most people who are against your idea are the people who are older. Self-serving bias perhaps? Even if you don't go T-14, earning a J.D. at 22 is still going to be pretty impressive to potential employers. If you know you want a law degree, wasting time "finding yourself" is absurd.

As an employer I don't know whether I'd be impressed with a 22-year-old graduate. There's a lot more to getting a job than just grades and the benefit to hiring people with more work experience is that the employer doesn't have to worry about keeping them behind the scenes as long to train them how to work with clients. Even a traditional student who is 22 is likely to have some work experience/internships under his/her belt that will be helpful during the interview process. I hesitate to guess what sort of work experience someone can get from ages 16-18.

And also as someone who hires, if someone hands me a resume, tells me they went to college at 14, got their jd at 22, and never had a real job, I'm going to have serious questions about their ability to perform in a real world setting. Do you think people can just go from working 15 hours a week to working 70 hours a week without undergoing some change?

sponger2004

Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2006, 03:56:24 PM »
And how old are both of you? It's fun to play the hypothetical game, huh? This guy's a Philosophy major and you guys are the one's speculating about possible states of existence. Interesting. What do you guys know about what employers at firms think? I was under the impression that during law school you get good grades, you get summer internships, and then get hired when you graduate. You think the employers really care if you didn't work before law school? I would think they'd be more concerned with how well you know and can apply the law. That's just me though.

Furthermore, you think that somebody that has the drive to graduate at 18 can't work a lot of hours? What possible work experience even closely resembles that of lawyering? Furthermore, what kind of work experience is a Philosophy major going to get anyway? Flipping burgers? I'm sure that's going to look good to potential employers. Look at this guy...instead of going to law school straight out of UG he flipped burgers at Mickey D's. Let's hire him. Basically, this kid's got three options: go to graduate school, go to law school, or go work somewhere that ain't gonna pay him jack. You guys are giving him some pretty good advice. Yeah, just put off your ambitions kid. It's okay to put your life on hold so that you can go waste your time "growing up" or getting "life experiences", whatever the #$!& those terms mean.

Hank Rearden

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #18 on: September 16, 2006, 04:10:15 PM »
Once again, some people are more mature than others.  Some 18-20 year olds really are immature and can't be depended on for anything.  Others though are simply more responsible and could do just as well in a big firm job at 24 as they could at 27.  If you don't know if you want to go to law school, by all means wait.  But if you present yourself well to employers and have good grades (and are a good worker), I don't see why age would be an issue.   

pikey

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Re: Is 18 too young for LSAT and Law School?
« Reply #19 on: September 16, 2006, 04:23:25 PM »
Once again, some people are more mature than others.  Some 18-20 year olds really are immature and can't be depended on for anything.  Others though are simply more responsible and could do just as well in a big firm job at 24 as they could at 27.  If you don't know if you want to go to law school, by all means wait.  But if you present yourself well to employers and have good grades (and are a good worker), I don't see why age would be an issue.  

It's not age that's the issue, it's experience. The OP has none, which means that classmates with similar grades but more experience will be ahead of him when it's time to find jobs during LS, which usually leads to positions when you graduate.  He's starting the game behind everyone else.

And how old are both of you? It's fun to play the hypothetical game, huh? This guy's a Philosophy major and you guys are the one's speculating about possible states of existence. Interesting. What do you guys know about what employers at firms think? I was under the impression that during law school you get good grades, you get summer internships, and then get hired when you graduate. You think the employers really care if you didn't work before law school? I would think they'd be more concerned with how well you know and can apply the law. That's just me though.

Furthermore, you think that somebody that has the drive to graduate at 18 can't work a lot of hours? What possible work experience even closely resembles that of lawyering? Furthermore, what kind of work experience is a Philosophy major going to get anyway? Flipping burgers? I'm sure that's going to look good to potential employers. Look at this guy...instead of going to law school straight out of UG he flipped burgers at Mickey D's. Let's hire him. Basically, this kid's got three options: go to graduate school, go to law school, or go work somewhere that ain't gonna pay him jack. You guys are giving him some pretty good advice. Yeah, just put off your ambitions kid. It's okay to put your life on hold so that you can go waste your time "growing up" or getting "life experiences", whatever the #$!& those terms mean.
No lawyers aren't just concerned with how well you apply the law.  When you get to the real world, you'll learn that employers are concerned with more than just how intelligent you are and what you know.  They want to know if you can work with other people, if you can 'sell' the firm and bring in new clients, and if you can handle a competitive professional environment (which is not the same as a competitive academic environment).  Just because someone can do well in school does not mean that they can do well in the workplace.  That's why firms interview you instead of just choosing the students in order of GPA.

As for what type of job he can get, consulting is one field in particular where  they recruit from all majors.  His GPA will make him competitive.  Experience in a field like that would definitely increase his attractiveness to future legal employers.