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Author Topic: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have  (Read 3583 times)

prelaw_undergrad

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Re: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2004, 09:25:15 AM »
They dont use real test questions and their methods contradict each other.

I think students should just stay away from Kaplan period.

I agree with you Victor.  I joined the pre-law co-ed fraternity (basically a honors club, not something you have to pledge to or do freeky greeky stuff) and we, as a group, studied for the LSAT (usually once a month as a whole group) and at the end of the month we took a practice LSAT. 

We shared the costs of the books and one of the books we purchased was Kaplan's LSAT 180.  I have an average score of 170+ (started out at only 165 but have improved over time) but after trying to study and understand Kaplan's method my score dropped to a 162/161 on the next two tests I took.  Everyone in the group had his/her LSAT score either drop or stay the same after using Kaplan's 180 LSAT methods.  On one page Kaplan had the exact same type of problem (logical reasoning), except one story was about tanks and the other was about people, and Kaplan had two completely different answers!!!  Also, Kaplan had two different reasons for theses answers, and neither reason was logical! 

I think that Kaplan's LSAT 180 is lacking judgment and would be a better bet if Kaplan would stop being cheap and actually buy REAL LSAT questions from LSAC!

Victor

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Re: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2004, 05:03:51 AM »
They dont use real test questions and their methods contradict each other.

I think students should just stay away from Kaplan period.

I agree with you Victor.  I joined the pre-law co-ed fraternity (basically a honors club, not something you have to pledge to or do freeky greeky stuff) and we, as a group, studied for the LSAT (usually once a month as a whole group) and at the end of the month we took a practice LSAT. 

We shared the costs of the books and one of the books we purchased was Kaplan's LSAT 180.  I have an average score of 170+ (started out at only 165 but have improved over time) but after trying to study and understand Kaplan's method my score dropped to a 162/161 on the next two tests I took.  Everyone in the group had his/her LSAT score either drop or stay the same after using Kaplan's 180 LSAT methods.  On one page Kaplan had the exact same type of problem (logical reasoning), except one story was about tanks and the other was about people, and Kaplan had two completely different answers!!!  Also, Kaplan had two different reasons for theses answers, and neither reason was logical! 

I think that Kaplan's LSAT 180 is lacking judgment and would be a better bet if Kaplan would stop being cheap and actually buy REAL LSAT questions from LSAC!

Exactly. When do you take the LSAT's? I think its great that you are able to study with a group of students. Which undergrad school do you attend?

I'm a Pre Law student also, but my school is totally different, everyone is doing their own thing.

tuffguy

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Re: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2004, 12:24:36 PM »
Don't like the Pinceton Review too much.  Found that the annoying little jokes make me want to stab myself with a spoon.  Nova's Master the LSAT and the LogicGames Bible have both been useful.  And the Real LSATS are a must.  Supposedly the new edition of Real LSATS is coming out this summer, so I will definitely be picking those up.  Just curious, how many practice LSATS did most of you guys take prior to taking the LSAT for real?

Jason

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Re: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2004, 02:45:01 PM »
Any work books from LSAT180 are great, and the Real Books are a given.  There are several LSAT180 books that explain the answers in the Real Books.


prelaw_undergrad

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Re: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2004, 03:13:43 PM »
Victor, to answer your question, I will probably take the LSAT in Oct, since I don't think I will be in the country in June.

Just curious, how many practice LSATS did most of you guys take prior to taking the LSAT for real?

I've taken at least 7: four from "10 Real LSATs," one at a free Kaplan session, one that you can print from the LSAC website, and the June 03 LSAT. 

A book is being released, approx. June this year, that will have the first ten tests administered after the last book was published.  I will buy some newer tests, for $8.00/test, instead of the new book since I don't think I need to study as much as I had in the past.

kslaw

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Re: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2004, 03:25:30 PM »
I took six. The four most recent, ordered from the www.lsac.org, and the two in the Princeton Review Cracking the LSAT. I took the first one untimed, got a 161. Went over the tips and strategies in the book, took the second one, got a 166. Went over the logical reasoning strategies again.

Took a timed practice exam, got a 159 (ran out of time). Second timed exam, 164. Third and Fourth, 169 and 171.

actually, I took 7 tests, I had one timed one (last one) that was 174.

Here's my question, people who took the December or October tests...how did you do relative to your practice exams? and how did you think you did leaving the test? I felt like I did better on the real exam than I did on the timed practice ones (no dog yipping at my heels, I actually finished the real exam and never finished a practice one in time). anyway, I interpret that to mean I did horribly on the real exam. did anyone come out of the real exam, feeling they did better than the practice exams, only to be surprised by a score 10 points lower than any practice exam?

I'm just so anxious.

waiting

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Re: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2004, 05:15:44 PM »
I think anything besides copies of the real tests is a bunch of horse crap. 

Focus on answering the questions, practice with actual questions until you figure it out... everyone has their own methodology for arriving at a correct answer.  Trying to copy someone else's methodology is like trying to fit a square peg in a round hole.

These LSAT books remind me of "Lose Weight Fast!" scams... they try to give you an easy way out.  Anyone who's tried to lose weight knows that the only way is to eat right and exercise, and everybody's body acts differently.  Some people lose weight by skipping a Coke every day, some people need to run a mile.  But if you want it bad enough you'll put in the time.

Same with the LSAT.  Some only need to skim tests to get a great score.  Others are going to have to do a lot of practicing.  But if you want it bad enough, you're going to put in a time and not look for shortcuts. 

Dante Hicks

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Re: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2004, 06:06:16 PM »
While I agree with you for the most part "waiting", I do believe that being exposed to different methodologies concerning the Logic Games section could be beneficial.  The right diagrams can make you or break you on exam day; in my opinion only.

 :'(
One day it was so cold in Chicago that the lawyers had their hands in their own pockets.

Victor

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Re: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have
« Reply #18 on: February 14, 2004, 08:00:19 PM »
I know I said just critique LSAT/Law School books, but does anyone want to give a critique to the film "Paper Chase." Seems like everyone makes references to "Paper Chase" when talking about law school.




Dante Hicks

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Re: Critique the LSAT/Law School books you have
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2004, 10:53:09 AM »
The Paper Chase is a brilliant film in my opinion.  I happen to watch it on DVD at least twice a month.  The mood and culture of our country at that time is reflected so much in the film.  The prestige (and somewhat somber atmospehere) of Harvard can be also felt. Timothy Bottom's portrayal of Hart is also brilliant, as well as the rest of the great cast.  I need not mention the Kingsfield character at the risk of increasing the anxiety of the current law students who have abominable profs.

It takes some patience to get through the film as the pace is slower than most of today's films; but this is a story that has to take its time to be told.  This movie wouldn't probably be as good if it were filmed today.  The film can be inspiring for those who seek a career in law.

I also suggest watching Paul Newman in "The Verdict" as well as "The Rainmaker" to aspiring law students.  There is also a memorable scene in "The Insider" when Bruce McGill is giving his deposition to Russel Crowe.  Those who have seen the Insider are well aware of what scene I'm talking about!

 ;)
One day it was so cold in Chicago that the lawyers had their hands in their own pockets.