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Author Topic: Full ride  (Read 17858 times)

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Re: Full ride
« Reply #20 on: December 08, 2006, 10:32:09 AM »
I do have sympathy with your scenario, specially since I will probably not get in to a T1 myself ;) But honestly, what you are stating should be pretty much obvious to anyone who has actually researched this education before starting it. Yeah, a top school is going to cost you easily $100k or more extra, but the fact that your career choices will be so much more open and very likely so much better paying, it really should be a nobrainer unless your finances are completely screwed before going into law school.

Booyakasha2

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Re: Full ride
« Reply #21 on: December 08, 2006, 10:57:01 AM »
Right, im just afraid of the conditiosn many schools attach with their scholarship.  Like in your case, who knows how each of us will adjust to LS academics...that 3.0 might be real tough to uphold.
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sneafle

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Re: Full ride
« Reply #22 on: December 08, 2006, 10:58:32 AM »
I do have sympathy with your scenario, specially since I will probably not get in to a T1 myself ;) But honestly, what you are stating should be pretty much obvious to anyone who has actually researched this education before starting it. Yeah, a top school is going to cost you easily $100k or more extra, but the fact that your career choices will be so much more open and very likely so much better paying, it really should be a nobrainer unless your finances are completely screwed before going into law school.

I tend to agree. It seems to me that the bottom 150 law schools is something of a scam. The tuition is outrageous in almost all instances, and when they do give you a scholarship, it tends to be difficult to maintain. Job prospects for people spending roughly $100,000 on school are not good (certainly not as good as they should be given the effort and expense), yet schools routinely obfuscate the actual job and salary prospects, making it very difficult for those researching law as a career to make an informed decision. I understand that not everyone wants to work in a large law firm, but it would appear that tuition is as high as it is because schools can always claim that "we have 99.8% employment at 9 months from graduation, with a median salary of $115,000," when clearly that is patently untrue for most schools.

This is not to offend anyone attending such an institution, and many people, hopefully, do find gainful employment. It just really bothers me that law schools hold their noses in the air pretending to be the gatekeepers to a noble profession, wherein your volunteer work and meaningful life experiences are examined under a microscope to make sure that only saints are allowed in, while simultaneously misrepresenting the law school experience and job prospects. (Please don't write about the guy who graduated from a 5th tier school and is now driving a BMW. We all know someone like that.)

darlinalexi

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Re: Full ride
« Reply #23 on: December 08, 2006, 11:01:29 AM »
See, I'm looking at the best fit program for myself over maybe the biggest name.  I do want to go into public interest, so it doesn't matter as much where I go as someone who is looking to work for a large corporate firm. Honestly, if I apply to Georgetown or Berkeley (it all depends on my LSAT scores because if I don't do well, I have no shot this late in the game) and recieve an offer, I'll probably go.  There are, though, factors other than name involved too. 

- I will only go to school in Boston, NYC Metropolitan Area, DC area, or possibly Chicago.  It's extremely important to be to be in an area that I would be happy to live and work in upon graduation.  These are large markets, but if I go to a lower ranked school that still has a decent regional reputation and want to remain in that region, I'll be okay.

- I'm going into public interest, like I stated, so if I get a full-ride somewhere not as high up on my list, I'll definately consider it since I can't count on a large paycheck coming out of school. It's just not a priority to me nor is it why I want to become a lawyer.   I will be happy as long as I'm in an area where I can affect the people around me, be in a city with great public transporation where things are grouped together as opposed to being spread out, and as long as I'm in a politically more liberal area. I don't think I need a lot more than that.  Others who may want to work in their hometown as family or estate lawyers probably do not need to go to a tier one to be successful; maybe their happiness will be a job which allows them to spend more time with their family and less time paying off school debt.

- One area of law I'm particularly interested in because I have many friends affected by these issues is the area of LGBT advocacy law. Hofstra, not a very well-ranked school, has a strong program in that area so if I went there, I don't think I'd be depriving myself of a good education (especially if they gave me money).  I have a good friend that wants to go into Securities and is looking at Northeastern because they have decent placement with the SEC; not the greatest school but she could get what she needs at their program. 


I'm not saying a tier one for all wouldn't be awesome, but I do think even the best schools have their draw-backs and it's best to look towards individual needs and goals to determine the best placement for everyone.

fmlaw

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Re: Full ride
« Reply #24 on: December 08, 2006, 11:03:41 AM »
wow thats really good to know.. i'm sorry that happened to u, but thanks for telling us, i mean, at least i know i've repeatedly thought of the idea of going to a lower school for the money
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smack

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Re: Full ride
« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2006, 11:10:58 AM »
This is depressing...a 4th tier school in my community is very well respected.  I think thats true for a lot of 4th tier schools, that they are respected by the community, even if not a nationally recognized school.  Guess this only matters if you have roots.

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Re: Full ride
« Reply #26 on: December 08, 2006, 11:13:00 AM »
This is depressing...a 4th tier school in my community is very well respected.  I think thats true for a lot of 4th tier schools, that they are respected by the community, even if not a nationally recognized school.  Guess this only matters if you have roots.
No, the top 20% of your local tier 4 school is "well respected". And even those 20% will have to work their ass off to get noticed, and they will be lucky to have 1 job offer at graduation, unlike a tier 1 graduate who will have a list of firms to chose from.

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Re: Full ride
« Reply #27 on: December 08, 2006, 11:13:07 AM »
This is depressing...a 4th tier school in my community is very well respected.  I think thats true for a lot of 4th tier schools, that they are respected by the community, even if not a nationally recognized school.  Guess this only matters if you have roots.

i dunno.

if its the only school in your area, and you want to stay there, its prob a good deal.

UNLV for instance. 
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theprocrastinator

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Re: Full ride
« Reply #28 on: December 08, 2006, 11:38:27 AM »
I do have sympathy with your scenario, specially since I will probably not get in to a T1 myself ;) But honestly, what you are stating should be pretty much obvious to anyone who has actually researched this education before starting it. Yeah, a top school is going to cost you easily $100k or more extra, but the fact that your career choices will be so much more open and very likely so much better paying, it really should be a nobrainer unless your finances are completely screwed before going into law school.

Yeah, I tend to think that a lot of people don't realize or just refuse to believe how much of an uphill battle going to a lower ranked school can be. I know that was the case for me at least. In any case, I didn't post here for a pity party, I just thought that hearing about the difficulties of attending a t3 from somebody who has been through it might get the idea into some people's heads.

That being said, there are definitely some scenarios where taking the money is going to be worth it, but its a case by case thing.

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Re: Full ride
« Reply #29 on: December 08, 2006, 11:41:03 AM »
Sure, you're not actually getting any pity either, you do have a law degree and as difficult as it may be to get a job, that still puts you over at least 80% of the population, so not feeling too bad for you :) But yeah, the reality seems to be life at a tier3 school is more demanding than life at even the best schools. I also think employers are a bit too much into the 'great school' fetish, I refuse to believe that the 50th percentile on Columbia is better than the number 1 graduate at Cardozo as an example. But this is reality, and you can't pick an education by how you think the world should work.