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Author Topic: national merit scholarship?  (Read 724 times)

Hank Rearden

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national merit scholarship?
« on: September 02, 2006, 03:08:39 PM »
Anyone putting national merit scholarship within the "awards" section of applications?  I am hesitant to include it because it is based on a test people take their junior years of high school, but it is a college scholarship, and I feel like I should write as many awards as I can. 
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strivergirl

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Re: national merit scholarship?
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2006, 04:11:21 PM »
i didn't even think about listing it.  hmmm...

prolesurge

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Re: national merit scholarship?
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2006, 04:44:22 PM »
Anyone putting national merit scholarship within the "awards" section of applications?  I am hesitant to include it because it is based on a test people take their junior years of high school, but it is a college scholarship, and I feel like I should write as many awards as I can. 

If I had it, I would list it-but I would list it last.

letylyf

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Re: national merit scholarship?
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2006, 03:29:59 AM »
Well, I'm listing it, but honestly I don't have all that much to list, so every bit counts.

dollarbill

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Re: national merit scholarship?
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2006, 06:09:20 AM »
It's not going to make a bit of difference whether you list it or not.

Hank Rearden

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Re: national merit scholarship?
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2006, 12:15:12 PM »
So you don't think they care about "Awards: academic or non-academic"?  Of course the actual award, unless it is something really outstanding, is pretty pointless.  I just figured that if the adcom was shuffling through the applications and noticed you had a filled up Awards section that they might think a little more fondly of you than someone who wrote nothing. 
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The appropriateness of Perpetua would probably depend on the tone of the writing.  When I used it, I (half playfully) thought the extra space made the words sort of resonate.

dollarbill

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Re: national merit scholarship?
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2006, 04:27:37 PM »
Again, it's not going to make a difference.  It's not going to put you over the top or help at all.  They will spend maybe ten seconds even looking at your resume.

letylyf

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Re: national merit scholarship?
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2006, 05:33:16 PM »
Maybe there's no difference between a full and a mostly full box on the application, but there's a big enough difference between an empty one and a full one.

Anyway, you can't generalize schools and addcoms. Maybe some don't look at it, but I'm sure some do. It just depends. I stick with 'it's better to put it than not.'

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Re: national merit scholarship?
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2006, 05:46:05 PM »
I would not list it because it is something you tested for while in high school. If they gave an award like that for the LSAT, then it is something that should be listed.
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Hank Rearden

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Re: national merit scholarship?
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2006, 08:19:36 PM »
I would not list it because it is something you tested for while in high school. If they gave an award like that for the LSAT, then it is something that should be listed.

Maybe they should.   ;)
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The appropriateness of Perpetua would probably depend on the tone of the writing.  When I used it, I (half playfully) thought the extra space made the words sort of resonate.