Law School Discussion

First day reading?

1LMan

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Re: First day reading?
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2006, 05:17:56 AM »
I have roughly 60 pages to read for day one of contracts.  Day two is an additional 15 pages or so.

They definitely hit the ground running.

Re: First day reading?
« Reply #21 on: August 17, 2006, 08:25:29 AM »
Don't worry, soon you'll have writing assignments on top of the reading. It'll get worse.

Re: First day reading?
« Reply #22 on: August 17, 2006, 08:37:57 AM »
The first day's reading assignment can sometimes be longer in terms of pages in the book, but often profs will just blow through those first 60 pages or whatever.  This is because there isn't really much in the way of substance at the beginning of most 1L casebooks.  A lot of it is just background material or things that set the stage for what you'll be learning throughout the semester. 

In other words, I wouldn't get too bogged down with the first day's assignment.  Make sure you can recite basic facts of any cases in the event that you are called on, but don't kill yourself trying to memorize every detail of what you read.  The 15 pages you have to read for the second day are probably far more important than the 60 pages you have to read for the first.

Re: First day reading?
« Reply #23 on: August 18, 2006, 01:56:54 PM »
Ever, who do you have for Writing & Research?  Do you have to read that intro book? 

Re: First day reading?
« Reply #24 on: August 18, 2006, 04:44:08 PM »
this makes me SO glad that our school requires a week long orientation during which we take a class for which we have a final tomorrow morning. our average reading per night was 45-60 pages--it's not nearly as scary as I thought.

Ever

Re: First day reading?
« Reply #25 on: August 21, 2006, 02:54:18 PM »
Would it be worthwhile to run out and grab a used copy of Black's Law Dictionary?

If you have Rogers for Contracts, definitely get a dictionary. He will look for the most obscure words in a case - both legal and non-legal - and expect you to know what the words mean.

If you have Dorsaneo for Civ Pro...just be prepared. Know what the procedural posture of the case is (his words) and be ready to be wrong. This guy actually wrote the book and Texas Civil Procedure and actually has a link on Lexis Nexis. But the class is really entertaining....especially when he goes on a rant.

So turns out that I have both Rogers and Dorsaneo... Should be intresting.

midjeep - I didn't realize you go to SMU. You're a 2L? Can you explain what the hell a gunner is? My mentors were chatting about that today, but I didn't catch everything they said.

J D

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Re: First day reading?
« Reply #26 on: August 21, 2006, 04:12:59 PM »
Would it be worthwhile to run out and grab a used copy of Black's Law Dictionary?

If you have Rogers for Contracts, definitely get a dictionary. He will look for the most obscure words in a case - both legal and non-legal - and expect you to know what the words mean.

If you have Dorsaneo for Civ Pro...just be prepared. Know what the procedural posture of the case is (his words) and be ready to be wrong. This guy actually wrote the book and Texas Civil Procedure and actually has a link on Lexis Nexis. But the class is really entertaining....especially when he goes on a rant.

So turns out that I have both Rogers and Dorsaneo... Should be intresting.

midjeep - I didn't realize you go to SMU. You're a 2L? Can you explain what the hell a gunner is? My mentors were chatting about that today, but I didn't catch everything they said.

The term is not unique to SMU, by any means.  In general, a "gunner" (or "classhole") is that annoying person who loves to hear himself talk, the one who tackles 30 other students at the end of class to be the first to reach the professor's podium (where he will procede to monopolize ALL the afterclass question time the professor has), the one whose hand is always the first in the air with some (usually irrelevant) musing or comment on the law; if he ever asks a question, it's usually about something else that might be related to the topic at hand, but which wasn't discussed or alluded to at all in the assigned materials, and the point is not to get an answer, but to let everyone know how well-read and smart the person asking the question is.  The gunner is also most likely the one bragging about how much studying he did last night, how little sleep he's getting, or how interesting his office hours sessions with the professor were ("I had this MARVELOUS discussion with Professor Bowtie yesterday about Judge Posner's views on strict liability in Indiana Belt Harbor!  A shame you all weren't there!"  "Did you also spend all night going over the revised UCC?  Really?!  Well, maybe you might still pass" (these examples are taken or adapted from Law School Confidential).

In short, the gunner is the really annoying, really vocal classmate whom no one likes.  Try not to be that guy.  It's not like there's anything wrong with being active or engaged in class, with going beyond the assignments if the stuff interests you, with going to office hours, etc.  This is all very smart, and should serve you well in the long term (e.g., it helps build a better relationship with a professor who might then serve as a recommender, or a paper advisor, or who might help you hone an idea for a journal comment or note).  But be mindful of how you do it.  Don't try to show off, don't brag about it or lord it over your other classmates, don't hog class time on things that are really just a sidenote (even if you find them personally interesting, the rest of the class might not and probably doesn't, so save those questions and comments for more private moments with the professor, like email, office hours, etc.), and be considerate of other classmates and their needs.  It's hard to become the gunner, I think, if you just remember that there are more people in the class than just you.

Anyway, good luck. 

yiplong

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Re: First day reading?
« Reply #27 on: August 23, 2006, 07:41:49 PM »
I am not very big on raising my hands in classroom discussion.  Should that in anyway hurt my performance on law school exams? I do go to classese and pay attendtion and do the readings.

Ever

Re: First day reading?
« Reply #28 on: August 23, 2006, 08:07:05 PM »
Ever, who do you have for Writing & Research?  Do you have to read that intro book? 

Hey sorry - didn't see your post - I have Dureus. I've been reading through the "Bridging the gap" book but it isn't all that helpful. Is that the book you're talking about?

midjeep

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Re: First day reading?
« Reply #29 on: August 24, 2006, 06:01:25 AM »
I am not very big on raising my hands in classroom discussion.  Should that in anyway hurt my performance on law school exams? I do go to classese and pay attendtion and do the readings.

For the most part no. Some profs I had had a 10% class participation requirement. All it meant is that you had to be prepared if you were ever called on. Your classes are too large for the profs to except you to actively participate without solicitation. I did have a class this summer that actually required daily participation, but there were only 18 students in that class.