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Author Topic: It is not hard to focus for full length test when its not real?  (Read 772 times)

JoeGibbsRedskins

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I know most people who post here are 3.9 students.  And the smartest people around.

But average students like me. We cram, are not focused all the time.  Step it up only when it is real important.

I am not talking to u guys who are fustrated because u are not getting a 180. The regular people. Do you think it is smart to take so many full length test?

It is intresting. My powerscore teacher was a average student basically. And when she studied she said she only took sections. She built her way up before test day.  I told her how people on here take like 40 test. She thought everyone here was sick. She got a 174 on the real test.

I just do not get how u guys stay focused enough to do it. Even football and basketball players do not pratice like they are in the super bowl. They work on certain things everyday.

Are there any tricks that u guys to do focus like it is  test day? I really want to know.

Thanks.

Hey Now

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Re: It is not hard to focus for full length test when its not real?
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2006, 10:39:58 PM »
I think a lot of people take so many tests because they're insecure, and by repeatedly scoring well on practice tests they reassure themselves.  That's why you see so many frantic/desperate posts when someone has a bad practice score.  Some people are just neurotic and won't feel comfortable if they don't see every question available.  And some people are just dedicated, and are willing to put in more work for steady increases.  But I think you can definitely do well without taking 40 tests.
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rtqw

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Re: It is not hard to focus for full length test when its not real?
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2006, 12:00:31 AM »
Well first, I think applying to law school in general and this board specifically has a way with messing with the idea of what is 'normal'. I'm not sure what that implies for how you should prepare for the test, but I think it's worth noting everytime someone brings up normal students.

I think we're exaggerating a bit as to what the average LSD poster does. I don't think most people are taking anywhere close to forty full preptests. For the record, 172 scorer here with probably 12-13 full preptests and another 12-13 preptests taken in sections.

I don't think you need to take forty full length tests, but I do think it's important to get acquainted with the test in a 'macro' way- getting a routine settled, being comfortable with your time, not standing up for 105 minutes, pacing, etc. I do think this requires a decent number of full preptests taken under real conditions.

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StudentUVA

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Re: It is not hard to focus for full length test when its not real?
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2006, 12:37:30 AM »
I'm taking all 53 tests because i just have no idea how else to prepare for it. As far as getting bored during the test, i usually don't face this problem since i go to my school's library and pretty much have nothing else to do but take the test. Plus, i get pretty upset/angry at poor performance so i try to do my best on these prep tests.

MotownSaint

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Re: It is not hard to focus for full length test when its not real?
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2006, 08:40:18 AM »
For me, I really think that I'll do much better on the real test than I have been on my practice tests.  I just can't take the practice tests seriously.

But the reason I'm so confident about the real LSAT is because I'm so enthusiastic about it.  I really want to take that test!  Someone once told me that a very useful way to improve your performance on a standardized test is to get pumped about the fact that you're taking it.  That advice has seen me through many a standardized test with wonderful results.

When I wake up on the morning of the LSAT, I'm going to get up and do a little dance of joy because it's test day.  When I get in the test room I'm going to tear into that thing and show it just who the hell it's dealing with.

But for the practice tests?  Ugh, I'm with you there man.  I often stop and fix some tea or something.  I know it's not conducive to building your "stamina" or fixating timing issues, but I'm not overly concerned.

If I feel like I really need to focus on a test though, then the only key to doing that is to really and truly focus on that issue.  Clear your schedule, lock yourself away from the world, bring a candy bar and a Coke, and just do it.  Tie your leg to your chair with your shoelaces or something, that way you can't just get up and wander around before you realize what you're doing.

And if you can't achieve that then maybe there's a slight attention disorder, or - more likely - you haven't really convinced yourself the issue (test) is that important.  That's something you have to address personally.  If you're like me, then you have difficulty placing importance on things fairly distant in the future.  So make it important in the present.  Bet someone $50 that you can finish the test in time and mean it.

If all that doesn't work, well then I just don't know ;)

krumanadi

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Re: It is not hard to focus for full length test when its not real?
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2006, 08:55:32 AM »
The only advantage to taking a full test is to prepare your stamina for the real test.  Beyond that, I think it only hurts.  I found the best way of studying for me was to take a section, score the section, analyze why I got this question wrong, and why I got this question right.  Repeat.  When I would do a full test. by the time I would score, I would be shot from taking it, and put not nearly as much effort into the analyzing, which is the most important part.  Either that, or I'd take a break before analyzing, and by the time I would get back to it, I was no longer in the mindset of the test, therefore making it impossible to get much from it.

Also, as far as getting upset or mad when getting a "bad" score, remember it is just practice.  The best way to stay calm on the actual test day is to keep your emotions balanced during the time you study.  Dont get too high after a good test,  because it will be that much lower after a bad test.

JoeGibbsRedskins

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Re: It is not hard to focus for full length test when its not real?
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2006, 02:04:15 PM »
The only advantage to taking a full test is to prepare your stamina for the real test.  Beyond that, I think it only hurts.  I found the best way of studying for me was to take a section, score the section, analyze why I got this question wrong, and why I got this question right.  Repeat.  When I would do a full test. by the time I would score, I would be shot from taking it, and put not nearly as much effort into the analyzing, which is the most important part.  Either that, or I'd take a break before analyzing, and by the time I would get back to it, I was no longer in the mindset of the test, therefore making it impossible to get much from it.

Also, as far as getting upset or mad when getting a "bad" score, remember it is just practice.  The best way to stay calm on the actual test day is to keep your emotions balanced during the time you study.  Dont get too high after a good test,  because it will be that much lower after a bad test.

Thats what i am saying. During the powerscore course when we took full length test, i would just look at the ones i got wrong because the test was so long. The ones i guessed on and got right i skipped because no one is going to review a test for 6 hrs.

I take taking sections is better. Stamina should never be a problem on test day. Are u going to be  thinking about  going to the movies during the real test? I do not think so. It will be a nervous energy.

Jets

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Re: It is not hard to focus for full length test when its not real?
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2006, 02:36:16 PM »
The only advantage to taking a full test is to prepare your stamina for the real test.  Beyond that, I think it only hurts.  I found the best way of studying for me was to take a section, score the section, analyze why I got this question wrong, and why I got this question right.  Repeat.  When I would do a full test. by the time I would score, I would be shot from taking it, and put not nearly as much effort into the analyzing, which is the most important part.  Either that, or I'd take a break before analyzing, and by the time I would get back to it, I was no longer in the mindset of the test, therefore making it impossible to get much from it.

Also, as far as getting upset or mad when getting a "bad" score, remember it is just practice.  The best way to stay calm on the actual test day is to keep your emotions balanced during the time you study.  Dont get too high after a good test,  because it will be that much lower after a bad test.

Thats what i am saying. During the powerscore course when we took full length test, i would just look at the ones i got wrong because the test was so long. The ones i guessed on and got right i skipped because no one is going to review a test for 6 hrs.

I take taking sections is better. Stamina should never be a problem on test day. Are u going to be  thinking about  going to the movies during the real test? I do not think so. It will be a nervous energy.

It never takes 6 hours...realistically, you spend 2 tops if you're scoring relatively well. There's no need to go over the easy questions as extensively as those you had a hard time with. And you KNOW what you struggled with vis-a-vis what you didn't.