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Author Topic: are native american indians from other countries still native americans?  (Read 1611 times)

juliemccoy

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Re: are native american indians from other countries still native americans?
« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2006, 06:23:10 PM »
the issue is that native american tribes have a legal relationship with the united states government that requires documentation of its members.  so while it may seem ridiculous to you, native americans who are legally enrolled in a tribe are quite familiar with providing this kind of information and it really doesn't feel like an inconvenience if you are, in a legal sense, native american.  so it doesn't necessarily feel like jumping through hoops if you are already an enrolled member of a tribe with legal documentation.  so you have to remember the special legal relationship that the united states government has with indian tribes when considering what is ridiculous or not and when drawing comparisons to other races/ethnic groups.  so claiming that you are native american for the purposes of applying to law school is not as easy as checking a box.   

I understand this, but if that is the case for the purpose of law school or college admissions, then all URMs should be required to qualify their URM status if they're going to enjoy the benefits of AA. I find it highly unfair that my black Jamaican friend who is from a very wealthy family and has enjoyed an elite private school education gets to mark off that he is African-American on his applications, while someone who is Native American has to file proof of status, however normal it may be for receiving other government benefits.
Vanderbilt 2010

randylf

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Re: are native american indians from other countries still native americans?
« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2006, 06:40:45 PM »
yes sometimes it does seem strange that i have to give documentation of my racial identity while other groups simply check a box regardless of their specific situation and with no real confirmation.  hopefully, though, people are responding honestly to questions about their identity.