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Author Topic: 0L, Do you plan to join a study group or will you generally fly solo?  (Read 1741 times)

beer gunner

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I kinda just want to find one other student; I am not so sure that the big group of 4-5 people will be as beneficial?  Not so sure though...
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check01

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I look at the situation like an incoming prisoner: the people who act like they want to be your friend on the first day are the ones trying to make you their female dog.

I plan to lay back, keep my abilities under wraps, and wait until I see people at a similar level before I try to join a group, if at all.  If you end up in a group where you're the best student, you're wasting your time as a free tutor. If you're the worst student, you're dragging people down and making them hate you. You have to fit in at your own level of understanding and effort.

You also have to be sure you don't get stuck in a group full of worthless people, like gossip-mongers or Republicans.

slacker

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I look at the situation like an incoming prisoner: the people who act like they want to be your friend on the first day are the ones trying to make you their female dog.

I plan to lay back, keep my abilities under wraps, and wait until I see people at a similar level before I try to join a group, if at all.  If you end up in a group where you're the best student, you're wasting your time as a free tutor. If you're the worst student, you're dragging people down and making them hate you. You have to fit in at your own level of understanding and effort.

You also have to be sure you don't get stuck in a group full of worthless people, like gossip-mongers or Republicans.

Wow...you must be lots of fun at parties.

Maybe the people who are nice to you just want to be your friend. Even though it's law school, it could happen.

Odds are good even if you understand one topic better than someone else, that doesn't mean that you'll understand everything better. As long as all are willing to work, it's good to have a "mixed" group. After all, your grade is based on how well you can explain the concepts. Having to explain them within your group can help that.

Perversely

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I look at the situation like an incoming prisoner: the people who act like they want to be your friend on the first day are the ones trying to make you their female dog.

I plan to lay back, keep my abilities under wraps, and wait until I see people at a similar level before I try to join a group, if at all.  If you end up in a group where you're the best student, you're wasting your time as a free tutor. If you're the worst student, you're dragging people down and making them hate you. You have to fit in at your own level of understanding and effort.

You also have to be sure you don't get stuck in a group full of worthless people, like gossip-mongers or Republicans.

i didn't know if i should cry or laugh... :-\

relax! it isn't prision and you never need to join a party of sorts...however, study mates are helpful.

SanchoPanzo

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I kinda just want to find one other student; I am not so sure that the big group of 4-5 people will be as beneficial?  Not so sure though...

Yes I do. I think I'd prefer a group of 3. A "group" of 2 is a study partner and a group of 4 or 5  (for me) may turn out to be too many ppl.
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slacker

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When you get around to moot court, practice with as many people as you can -- both on your side and on the other side. This is, admittedly, a special-case situation, but it's something that you'll probably deal with in your first year.

aerynn

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I think having a study partner or group can help keep me motivated to do my part of the reading and outlining.  Kind of like a workout buddy; it keeps you from slacking off if you know there is someone else depending on you.  I also learn material best when trying to explain it to someone else, so I am not worried about varying ability.  Either they will teach me something or I will learn by teaching it to them.  After all, if you spent time explaining concepts in clear, easy to understand language for someone in your group who just doesn't get it, you have basically done an oral version of the exam.

At least, that's what I am hoping.  It may be completely different in practice.
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tacojohn

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I look at the situation like an incoming prisoner: the people who act like they want to be your friend on the first day are the ones trying to make you their female dog.

I plan to lay back, keep my abilities under wraps, and wait until I see people at a similar level before I try to join a group, if at all.  If you end up in a group where you're the best student, you're wasting your time as a free tutor. If you're the worst student, you're dragging people down and making them hate you. You have to fit in at your own level of understanding and effort.

You also have to be sure you don't get stuck in a group full of worthless people, like gossip-mongers or Republicans.
Ah, so you're "that guy".  Even if there is a little bit of truth to what you say.  Don't jump into a group immediately.  Make sure you're in a group with people with similar goals, relatively similar ability, and who will do their fair share of work.  You can do this openly thought.  If someone invites you into a group just be upfront with them about what you will and won't do.  Be upfront with what you want to get out of the group.

Also, sandbagging is just as bad as bragging about how much you study and how smart you are.  I don't know how you plan to "hide your abilities", but whatever it is, it will probably result in you being labled a sandbagger, a gunner, a loaner, or just a jerk.

thenextstep

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I think I'll probably end up in a study group in the end, but I don't plan to find one early on.  It'll just depend on how things go though.  I actually do like being in the position of explaining things to others because it helps me learn so I think it would be fine to be in a group of trustworthy people who might not get it as well as I do.  They actually are doing their work but I might be able to help myself by explaining to them.  Of course I'm sure they'll explain things to me as well.  Does that make sense?  Anyway, I'm certainly not competitive enough to be unwilling to help someone else understand.  I've never been one to meet often to study, preferring instead to do it on my own until before an exam, though maybe that will change.  Especially if the only way to find others to study with towards exam time is to join a group earlier. 

check01

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Ah, so you're "that guy".  Even if there is a little bit of truth to what you say.

Sometimes I try to exaggerate the truth for humorous effect, and it sometimes fails. At least I cut out the part about beating up another 1L on the first day and the part where I called it "pound-me-in-the-ass law school." But as you say, the point remains: joining the first group that asks can be a big mistake.

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Also, sandbagging is just as bad as bragging about how much you study and how smart you are.  I don't know how you plan to "hide your abilities", but whatever it is, it will probably result in you being labled a sandbagger, a gunner, a loaner, or just a jerk.

How in the world would someone get the label of sandbagger?  Sandbagging is when you pretend to be bad at something (to get a higher handicap or lure someone into a large wager) and then reveal that you're actually good. Will people walk around the school saying, "There goes 'that guy' who doesn't talk much in class and didn't join a study group and didn't tell anyone what his grades were. I hate that sandbagger!"  They can't say that if they never find out that you're doing well -- and given the typical law student, they'll probably assume they're doing better than you if they have no evidence to the contrary, so how is that sandbagging?

On top of that, you made an assumption that "hiding my abilities" meant playing dumb because I'm so damn smart. What I actually wrote is that I'd look for people who I thought were performing at about my level, and steer clear of groups that are doing worse or better than I'm doing (or that are full of Republicans, of course).

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If someone invites you into a group just be upfront with them about what you will and won't do.  Be upfront with what you want to get out of the group.

This sounds more like being a jerk to me. Even if done nicely, dictating the terms of how your study group must operate seems arrogant and it's probably even stupid -- maybe the other people have some better ideas about how to study together. Leaving the group in the middle of the semester is also difficult to do while still keeping friends.  That's why laying back quietly and looking for people you'd like to study with is, IMO, the best strategy -- don't rush to ask people and don't just say yes to the people who rush to ask you.