Law School Discussion

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Author Topic: Difference in terms of work/intensity between Graduate School and Law School?  (Read 1147 times)

beer gunner

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What is the difference between these two in terms of workload and intensity, generally speaking?
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lawrenc967

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i think it depends on grad school for what.

beer gunner

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true that -

for liberal arts (reading/writing orientated majors)? 


hmmm - I just talked with a dude with a grad degree in engineering this evening - he said law school for him was totally different and to avoid the "big swirl"

...

The typical books Ive read say that if you can get through grad school you most likely can get through law school in fine shape as long as you apply yourself; I just wonder what the comparison is generally
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check01

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My wife went to grad school in NYC, and from what I can tell the biggest challenges were getting up after a night of hard drinking and finding a study room in the library where people weren't getting it on.  If you can avoid those two situations, law school should be a breeze.

queencruella

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There's usually quite a big difference between master's level and Ph.D. level work. I don't think my master's degree work will rival law school work, but Ph.D. coursework is pretty intense. Keep in mind that most graduate students teach or have graduate assistantships that are usually in the 15-20 hour a week range on top of their studies.

SanchoPanzo

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Coming from someone with a masters in engineering, I'd say that from what I've heard/read about law school, Law school will likely be more intense than my grad school experience.

Keep in mind as others have suggested that grad school experience can vary significantly. Even in my engineering department some grad students coasted along while others were hurting from work, etc. A lot depends on your thesis topic and the professor. Like law school, perhaps even more so, the professor is a big factor in the experience. Itís not uncommon to be working (teaching a class), doing research and taking classes with the same professor.
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UGAfootballfanatic

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My first year of the PhD program in social sciences couldn't be much easier than law school. I took 12 hours of grad classes, did research on the side, and held an TA position 15 hours a week. It really cut into my bar time... I don't think I can coast through law shcool but the reading load couldn't be much larger. With no job, I'm not too worried.

Gatank

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The whole grading structure between law school and graduate school is so different since you have to worry about grades so much more in law school.

UGAfootballfanatic

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I tend to think those of us who are not fresh out of undergrad still have a distinct advantage on the newly minted grads, all other things being equal. If anything, previous grad school experience should make your experience more unique and should add to the class and create better broader exam responses. Optimistically, of course.

beer gunner

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My wife went to grad school in NYC, and from what I can tell the biggest challenges were getting up after a night of hard drinking and finding a study room in the library where people weren't getting it on.  If you can avoid those two situations, law school should be a breeze.

I think this is the case - I hope that grad school gives those who have completed it a leg up.
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