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Author Topic: BLACK HAIR DOCUMENTARY - WHO RUNS THE INDUSTRY,AND WHY BLACKS ARE CHEATED?  (Read 826 times)

Nowhere Man

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Blackk Hair Documentary-who controls the market & why (video links)

This is a documentary on you tube about the Black Hair Care market being dominated by Koreans and the means they go through to have the market on lock. It also talks about how a lot of hair care products are not owned or distributed by Black owned companies at all.


Part 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p96aaTSdrAE
Part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWeLiXHcSyU
Part 3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azfEeDRvdlc
part 4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m67P2kT7TzQ

Black Owned Beauty Supply Association website
http://bobsa.org/index.php
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Nowhere Man

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These are TWO updates on the documentary released July 2006

Part 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PT-nX25UrsI

Part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0vyo6nwhuU
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mivida2k

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When I was up in Chicago in January I noticed how many Korean owned hair stores were on the southside.  What the video didn't show was how that on that street for blocks are hair stores and a few African owned hair braiding shops.  You don't find that many beauty shops in upper middle class neighborhoods, yet in economically challenged areas they are rampant.  I went in a few of those shops and noticed security cameras everywhere, security/metal detectors, and the usual "I am going to follow you around the store because I think that you are going to steal."

I met the lady from the Sun store and her son that is briefly showed ducking.  He tried to talk "black" to me and was promptly schooled.

BOBSA is a good idea.  However, it seems that the group needs to focus their efforts in the low income neighborhoods. By Black ya'll.
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shaz

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I find this documentary problematic, especially the supposed outrage over "giving all our money to them," (i.e., Koreans).

I understand that the people in the film are reluctant to see black hair care culture under the thumb of on an ethnic 'other' -- such dependency may understandably evoke bad memories. But color-based discrimination against store owners shouldn't be the message. How is this different from refusing, in disgust, to frequent stores owned by Jewish people? Either you're in favor of racial discrimination, or you're against it.

Furthermore, this constant air of a shocking exposť in this film is silly. The main conceit seems to be "black people are heavy consumers of such hair products -- so why do Koreans exclusively provide them?" I might as well ask, rich suburbanites are heavy producers of garbage, so why is their garbage taken by garbage men? And you know, absolutely NONE of the car mechanics in my area have graduate degrees from an Ivy! Come on people, I demand to be served by like-minded folks!

The group consuming a product or service is often different from the group providing it. How is this unusual?

did you even watch the documentary?  you're coming off like an ass.  there are all sorts of unfare business practice, copyrite, trademark issues in this documentary.  the problem is that one group is trying to take over an entire industry by undercutting another group at every turn.  did you see the part about azure products?!? 

oh, and your analogy sucks too.  jsia
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Rudy Huckleberry

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I find this documentary problematic, especially the supposed outrage over "giving all our money to them," (i.e., Koreans).

I understand that the folks shown in the film are reluctant to see black hair care culture under the thumb of on an ethnic 'other'. But color-based discrimination against store owners isn't a fair solution. How is this different from refusing, in disgust, to frequent stores owned by Jewish people? Either you're in favor of racial discrimination, or you're against it.

Furthermore, this constant air of a shocking exposť in this film is silly. The main conceit seems to be "black people are heavy consumers of such hair products -- so why do Koreans exclusively provide them?" I might as well ask, rich suburbanites are heavy producers of garbage, so why is their garbage taken by garbage men? And you know, absolutely none of the car mechanics in my area have graduate degrees from an Ivy! Come on, I demand to be served by like-minded folks!

The Korean ownership issue is interesting, sure. I just don't agree that it's horrible, or even particularly scandalous.

The group consuming a product or service is often different from the group providing it. This is actually the norm in society, if you think about it.

You're White, aren't you?  This sounds like something a well-meaning White person would say/think.  Incredibly simplistic views on race (e.g., "I don't see color, I just see people!" ::) )

Rudy Huckleberry

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Dr. Gonzo, do you believe in buying American?

Roxie

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Wasn't it weird that BOBSA decided to have their first meeting at Denny's??? ???
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J D

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I find this documentary problematic, especially the supposed outrage over "giving all our money to them," (i.e., Koreans).

I understand that the people in the film are reluctant to see black hair care culture under the thumb of on an ethnic 'other' -- such dependency may understandably evoke bad memories. But color-based discrimination against store owners shouldn't be the message. How is this different from refusing, in disgust, to frequent stores owned by Jewish people? Either you're in favor of racial discrimination, or you're against it.

Furthermore, this constant air of a shocking exposť in this film is silly. The main conceit seems to be "black people are heavy consumers of such hair products -- so why do Koreans exclusively provide them?" I might as well ask, rich suburbanites are heavy producers of garbage, so why is their garbage taken by garbage men? And you know, absolutely NONE of the car mechanics in my area have graduate degrees from an Ivy! Come on people, I demand to be served by like-minded folks!

The group consuming a product or service is often different from the group providing it. How is this unusual?

did you even watch the documentary?  you're coming off like an ass.  there are all sorts of unfare business practice, copyrite, trademark issues in this documentary.  the problem is that one group is trying to take over an entire industry by undercutting another group at every turn.  did you see the part about azure products?!? 

oh, and your analogy sucks too.  jsia

What really disturbs me is the "we won't sell to black-owned stores" bit.  Sounds like it would violate at least some anti-discrimination laws, maybe in some jurisdictions, like NJ.  I'm not familiar enough with Title VII to know for sure but I'm guessing this wouldn't be covered; the federal protections are comparatively limited.  I also don't know if this violates antitrust laws or FTC regulations, or equivalent state provisions; it might.  But while there may be enough to get in front of a jury there, I'm not sure what the chances of winning are.

I don't think I saw any real copyright or trademark problems.  Perhaps patent infringement, if the Kizure products are indeed patented.  But I don't know.  Knock-offs of common tools, which are for all practical purposes identical to each other (think of screwdrivers, combs, hairbrushes, scissors, etc.), are made all the time, and there's usually nothing unlawful about it. 

The idea of a boycott seems to show promise, since, after all, the Korean-owned stores are dependent for business almost entirely on the consumers they most risk alienating through these kinds of practices.  But I'm not sure how effective BOBSA and other like-minded people will be in maintaining the kind of cohesion necessary for an effective boycott.  As many in the documentary pointed out, a lot of consumers are ultimately driven by price, and if the Korean-owned store offers essentially the same thing at a significantly lower price, there are lots of people who are going to go there regardless of what methods that store uses to grab market share.  We see the same thing all the time with WalMart and other unconscionable retailers: consumers often could not care less how they manage to offer such low prices, they just keep their money and run.  The success of the boycott seems dependent, at least in part, on convincing black hair-care consumers to make purchases that seem at first glance to be contrary to their own self-interest; I don't know how well this will work.  :-\

Anyway, my $0.02
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shaz

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why do some people delete their posts when they are shown to be wrong.  this is exercise in argumentation.  just because you lose doesn't mean you can erase the record of your defeat.  just like some people! 

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J D

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why do some people delete their posts when they are shown to be wrong.  this is exercise in argumentation.  just because you lose doesn't mean you can erase the record of your defeat.  just like some people! 



The delicious irony is that, since others have already quoted them and advanced a rebuttal, the record of their defeat can never truly be expunged.  ;)
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