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Author Topic: getting to maybe...when to read?  (Read 1579 times)

syracuse1L

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Re: getting to maybe...when to read?
« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2006, 10:44:56 AM »
I think this is a good point.  I recently spoke with a guy who just graduated in the top 10% of his class, and he told me IRAC was a valuable approach.  As I read through GTM, I kept having the perception that the authors weren't quite getting beyond their own level of intellect.  I understand that for them the IRAC method was inadequate, but not all of us are Harvard grads..  I worry that a lot of their recommendations sound good in theory, but when test time actually arrives it would be hard to actually put down on paper what they recommend, or at least in the amount of depth they recommend.



Getting to Maybe's big problem is that while it tells you a lot of about what you need to have in a law school exam answer, it tells you very little and how to organize it or where in the answer stuff goes.  IRAC, for all its limitations, at leasts tells you how to present ideas.

crazy8

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Re: getting to maybe...when to read?
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2006, 10:56:48 AM »
I agree...I started reading and got through the first 100 pages and have since then put it down.  I got the basic common sense idea and was lost with their examples since I haven't yet taken a contracts class.  The weakness to the book is definitely that they don't really give examples (unless I just haven't read that far yet) but write in theory.  Can someone please tell me what IRAC stands for and their opinion of the book?

As far as the question to the thread, I would start reading it now, once you get the gist, put it down and pick it up and refresh yourself around finals.

syracuse1L

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Re: getting to maybe...when to read?
« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2006, 11:04:15 AM »
Dont get me wrong, I would still read it, I am reading  ton of stuff this summer, novels, prep books, even basic books about what torts are, etc..  However, in the back of my mind I am just prepared to 'let it all go' once my classes start in a few weeks.  In response to the question about IRAC, it stands for Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion.  The idea is that you approach exam questions by applying this four step approach.  I would assume it is still a valid way of approaching questions, but keeping in mind the GTM recommendations of 'looking beyond' the cases themselves, thinking about policy arguments and making points for both sides. 



I agree...I started reading and got through the first 100 pages and have since then put it down.  I got the basic common sense idea and was lost with their examples since I haven't yet taken a contracts class.  The weakness to the book is definitely that they don't really give examples (unless I just haven't read that far yet) but write in theory.  Can someone please tell me what IRAC stands for and their opinion of the book?

As far as the question to the thread, I would start reading it now, once you get the gist, put it down and pick it up and refresh yourself around finals.

cui bono?

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Re: getting to maybe...when to read?
« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2006, 11:04:47 AM »
I agree...I started reading and got through the first 100 pages and have since then put it down.  I got the basic common sense idea and was lost with their examples since I haven't yet taken a contracts class.  The weakness to the book is definitely that they don't really give examples (unless I just haven't read that far yet) but write in theory.  Can someone please tell me what IRAC stands for and their opinion of the book?

As far as the question to the thread, I would start reading it now, once you get the gist, put it down and pick it up and refresh yourself around finals.

IRAC= Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion  :)   There seems to be other avenues that do a better job of explaining it  (read: GTM assumes that you already know)
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crazy8

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Re: getting to maybe...when to read?
« Reply #14 on: July 28, 2006, 11:25:58 AM »
Letting it all go is definitely a good approach.  Also, I'm assuming that in class, both sides of most cases will be reviewed and therefore, it shouldn't be that difficult to remember to review those sides on an exam.  And every professor is different and you should be catering to his/her style.  May be overly simplistic but I really feel like these authors play up on the anxiety of law students.

Dont get me wrong, I would still read it, I am reading  ton of stuff this summer, novels, prep books, even basic books about what torts are, etc..  However, in the back of my mind I am just prepared to 'let it all go' once my classes start in a few weeks.  In response to the question about IRAC, it stands for Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion.  The idea is that you approach exam questions by applying this four step approach.  I would assume it is still a valid way of approaching questions, but keeping in mind the GTM recommendations of 'looking beyond' the cases themselves, thinking about policy arguments and making points for both sides. 



I agree...I started reading and got through the first 100 pages and have since then put it down.  I got the basic common sense idea and was lost with their examples since I haven't yet taken a contracts class.  The weakness to the book is definitely that they don't really give examples (unless I just haven't read that far yet) but write in theory.  Can someone please tell me what IRAC stands for and their opinion of the book?

As far as the question to the thread, I would start reading it now, once you get the gist, put it down and pick it up and refresh yourself around finals.

syracuse1L

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Re: getting to maybe...when to read?
« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2006, 11:51:42 AM »
I agree.  I have come to the conclusion that the USNWR and all the prep books feed on student paranoia.  You can see how it debilitates some kids, honestly debilitates them.  I have a friend who graduated three years ago, but decided he had to go to a top 10 school, and has been practicing for the LSAT for years.  I also think it is amazing how many kids flat out lie about LSAT scores.  When I talk to other kids who take it, you get the impression that 90% of LSAT takers get higher than a 160!!  My score, while not great, was still higher than 65% of all test takers, yet when I mention the number people act like I am an utter failure... It's pretty funny 

FlashInThePan

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Re: getting to maybe...when to read?
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2006, 12:10:12 PM »
Letting it all go is definitely a good approach.  Also, I'm assuming that in class, both sides of most cases will be reviewed and therefore, it shouldn't be that difficult to remember to review those sides on an exam.  And every professor is different and you should be catering to his/her style.  May be overly simplistic but I really feel like these authors play up on the anxiety of law students.

Dont get me wrong, I would still read it, I am reading  ton of stuff this summer, novels, prep books, even basic books about what torts are, etc..  However, in the back of my mind I am just prepared to 'let it all go' once my classes start in a few weeks.  In response to the question about IRAC, it stands for Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion.  The idea is that you approach exam questions by applying this four step approach.  I would assume it is still a valid way of approaching questions, but keeping in mind the GTM recommendations of 'looking beyond' the cases themselves, thinking about policy arguments and making points for both sides. 



I agree...I started reading and got through the first 100 pages and have since then put it down.  I got the basic common sense idea and was lost with their examples since I haven't yet taken a contracts class.  The weakness to the book is definitely that they don't really give examples (unless I just haven't read that far yet) but write in theory.  Can someone please tell me what IRAC stands for and their opinion of the book?

As far as the question to the thread, I would start reading it now, once you get the gist, put it down and pick it up and refresh yourself around finals.

Of course they play up on the anxiety of first year law takers. Making money off of people's fears is the best way to make money. Especially for anything post-graduate related.