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Author Topic: Life As An Associate  (Read 173138 times)

A.

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Re: Life As An Associate
« Reply #60 on: July 20, 2006, 10:55:55 AM »
As far as appointments maybe not the high profile ones. However if you go on any major executive dept. And look at the low and mid level appointees. (I did state the other day) most of hem came from another government position. The exception are the high profile ones.....which goes to the chief executives buddies.

I agree with that.

Einstein

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Re: Life As An Associate
« Reply #61 on: January 10, 2007, 03:38:08 PM »
No disrespect becasue I really appreciate that you read something rather than just presented what is essentially your opinion as fact...I have to disagree with this statement government jobs have in my experience which is going on 8 years The Most inclusive and tolerant environment you will find anywhere. Before anybody get on my nerves yes I am sure there is still discrimination somewhere by somebody but I have never had anywhere near the type of problems with race/diversity whatever as I have had in the private sector.

The problem with government jobs is who they attract:

1. People who are too stupid to be working in the private sector
2. Saints who want to make the world a better place
3. People who want to work less
4. People who want power

Most of the people you'll be dealing with fall squarely into catagory #1

I respectfully disagree with this statement. 
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Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Life As An Associate
« Reply #62 on: January 10, 2007, 04:15:27 PM »
Everybody who is going to be an associate or who has already worked as a summer associate should come back to post their experiences in this thread. I think it would be not only interesting but informative for those who are convinced that BigLaw is the way to go.
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LittleRussianPrincess, Esq.

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Re: Life As An Associate
« Reply #63 on: January 10, 2007, 04:20:26 PM »
Now back to my question:

I would like to work for a bank in either trusts or real estate (or maybe even general counsel).  The problem is that they all ask for experienced lawyers.  If anyone knows a good way to get there without working BigLaw for a few years please let me know. 

Experience, is experience, regardless if it's with biglaw. However, if you wish to work in a big city, the banks will want biglaw experience. Perhaps try working in a smaller city for a few years, then work for a bank in a smaller city which will give you experience to work for a bank, in a larger city.

Are biglaw jobs more manageable/interesting in smaller cities (such as Charlotte)?  And is there any way to gain specialised experience in real estate or trust work in biglaw or other firms soon after graduating for ls?

i don't know about interesting, because smaller markets tend to deal with smaller, more local clients, but the hours are somewhat more manageable. you're looking at billing a couple hundred hours less per year than in a major market. you'll also be taking a paycut, but in my mind, that's usually justified given the COL and the lifestyle benefits you acquire in the tradeoff.
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LittleRussianPrincess, Esq.

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Re: Life As An Associate
« Reply #64 on: January 10, 2007, 04:22:19 PM »
Everybody who is going to be an associate or who has already worked as a summer associate should come back to post their experiences in this thread. I think it would be not only interesting but informative for those who are convinced that BigLaw is the way to go.

i've done two biglaw firms and one legal aid internship. willing to answer any questions you might have. going into biglaw next fall, but at a firm i didn't summer with.
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Special Agent Dana Scully

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Re: Life As An Associate
« Reply #65 on: January 10, 2007, 04:30:44 PM »
Everybody who is going to be an associate or who has already worked as a summer associate should come back to post their experiences in this thread. I think it would be not only interesting but informative for those who are convinced that BigLaw is the way to go.

i've done two biglaw firms and one legal aid internship. willing to answer any questions you might have. going into biglaw next fall, but at a firm i didn't summer with.

Does that mean you did the 3L OCI?  How did that go over and did you have to explain why you were interviewing as a 3L?

Also, did you truly enjoy your experience?  What market are you going to?  What type of law are you going into?

THanks!
Columbia 3L

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Life As An Associate
« Reply #66 on: January 10, 2007, 04:36:26 PM »
Everybody who is going to be an associate or who has already worked as a summer associate should come back to post their experiences in this thread. I think it would be not only interesting but informative for those who are convinced that BigLaw is the way to go.

i've done two biglaw firms and one legal aid internship. willing to answer any questions you might have. going into biglaw next fall, but at a firm i didn't summer with.

I'm roughly in the same boat as you.  Was a summer associate for BigLaw (NYC) this past summer and will be going into BigLaw (NYC) with a different firm this fall, provided I pass the bar (pray for a brother).  I didn't realize how big of a deal it is to come in "blind" to a law firm that you didn't summer for.  I guess some firms base the majority of their
new hire class on their summer associate class. 

But have no fear folks, you have two living examples right here that you do NOT have to be a 2L summer associate at the firm of your choice in order to qualifiy as a full time associate there.  You can come in blind.
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

LittleRussianPrincess, Esq.

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Re: Life As An Associate
« Reply #67 on: January 10, 2007, 04:38:38 PM »
Everybody who is going to be an associate or who has already worked as a summer associate should come back to post their experiences in this thread. I think it would be not only interesting but informative for those who are convinced that BigLaw is the way to go.

i've done two biglaw firms and one legal aid internship. willing to answer any questions you might have. going into biglaw next fall, but at a firm i didn't summer with.

Does that mean you did the 3L OCI?  How did that go over and did you have to explain why you were interviewing as a 3L?

Also, did you truly enjoy your experience?  What market are you going to?  What type of law are you going into?

THanks!

yes i did 3l oci. many 3l's at my school do this, just to see what their options are before they commit to a certain firm. i think that it's no big deal unless you didn't get an offer from your summer firms. then there's certainly a stigma there that a person would have to overcome. i would think that it would be pretty tough to get any callbacks if you did not have an offer from your summer firm.

i came away from last summer with mixed feelings. i loved one of the firms, but not the city and the opposite was true for the other firm. at the end, i wasn't completely happy with the prospect of going to either one, so i sought out other options.

i am going to a firm in london next fall.
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Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Life As An Associate
« Reply #68 on: January 10, 2007, 04:52:42 PM »
Everybody who is going to be an associate or who has already worked as a summer associate should come back to post their experiences in this thread. I think it would be not only interesting but informative for those who are convinced that BigLaw is the way to go.

i've done two biglaw firms and one legal aid internship. willing to answer any questions you might have. going into biglaw next fall, but at a firm i didn't summer with.

Does that mean you did the 3L OCI?  How did that go over and did you have to explain why you were interviewing as a 3L?

Also, did you truly enjoy your experience?  What market are you going to?  What type of law are you going into?

THanks!

The general concensus that I found from friends at other schools as well as my own is that OCI as a 3L is significantly more difficult than OCI as a 2L.  Relatively speaking, firms are more willing to hand out summer associateships than they are to hand out full time associateships.  Additionally, at the 3L OCI level of the game, the firms are by and large looking to fill a specific spot.  "We have an opening in our securities transactions department, what is your experience with securities transactions?"  To which if you reply, "sorry I haven't yet been exposed to securities transactions" then you will likely hear "well thank you for your time."

So firms tend to be very specific during the 3L OCI in who they are looking for.  Not all firms are like this but it appears that the majority are.  At lesat they are in NY, I can't speak for other markets.  During 2L you didn't have to be a specialist in anything, just have decent grades, moot court, law review, ivy league school, whatever gets you in the door.  At the 3L level its a different story.

"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

intent06

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Re: Life As An Associate
« Reply #69 on: January 10, 2007, 05:14:24 PM »
I just recently found out that I have two interviews coming up...one with a govt. agency in DC and one with a BigLaw firm here in Houston.  I have had many job interviews outside of the legal arena prior to law school, but law firms are a new ballgame for me.  Any tips advice as I come face to face with the partners/associates who will be interviewing me?

Thanks for making this thread come back to life!
Damn...it's the third year already!!