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Author Topic: LEEWS  (Read 2103 times)

fainana

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LEEWS
« on: July 19, 2006, 03:56:37 AM »
Who's doing LEEWS, what do you think about it, and do you know anyone else who's done it? If you're generally a pretty strong writer, will LEEWS teach you something new? I'm trying to decide whether to buy the program, and would love some advice...

mcleod13

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Re: LEEWS
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2006, 06:59:49 AM »
I have been using LEEWS and it discusses more than just writing well for an exam. It discuss how to disect the test. It also teaches you how to write your answers. I have been told by a couple people that writing well on an exam isn't going to get you anywhere if you can't break down the test.

WhirlsAway

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Re: LEEWS
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2006, 10:18:33 AM »
When's the best time to do the program?

Typhoon Longwang

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Re: LEEWS
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2006, 10:21:47 AM »
I'm doing LEEWS on CD a week before LS starts and then probably a refresher before exams.

imago

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Re: LEEWS
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2006, 02:06:32 PM »
Who's doing LEEWS, what do you think about it, and do you know anyone else who's done it? If you're generally a pretty strong writer, will LEEWS teach you something new? I'm trying to decide whether to buy the program, and would love some advice...

I bought LEEWS a few weeks back and I plan to do it the week before orientation, revisiting it as necessary.  I consider myself a strong writer, but from what I understand, legal writing / exam writing is completely different beast.

One of the testimonials on the LEEWS website (the guy from the University of Georgia who says it took him from "a sense of bewilderment to one of mastery") is from a high school friend of mine.  He's a very bright guy and I respect his opinion.

Lionel Hutz

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Re: LEEWS
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2006, 02:43:21 PM »
Who's doing LEEWS, what do you think about it, and do you know anyone else who's done it? If you're generally a pretty strong writer, will LEEWS teach you something new? I'm trying to decide whether to buy the program, and would love some advice...

By all accounts, you will still have a lot to learn, no matter how good a writer you already are.

LEEWS is pretty much universally lauded, so it's a no brainer to me...what's a little over a hundred bucks compared to the metric tons of money spent on tuition?
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juliemccoy

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Re: LEEWS
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2006, 04:53:03 PM »
What is LEEWS?
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flydog

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Re: LEEWS
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2006, 06:30:30 PM »

AZWildcat

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Re: LEEWS
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2006, 07:02:48 PM »
LEEWS is pretty much universally lauded, so it's a no brainer to me...what's a little over a hundred bucks compared to the metric tons of money spent on tuition?

I've always argued this, but it's fallen on deaf ears.

Legal writing is about short, concise, on point sentences.  People who call themselves "good writers" normally construct 25-35 word sentences with a lot of fluff and ambigious terms.  In legal writing, every word must count.  You'll quickly learn that legal writing is more difficult than the long winded prose your English teacher loved.  The complex, huge word, ambiguous language is not how you effectively communicate an idea; it's often how you confuse people and keep them from figuring out what you actually know (or don't know, as is often the case). 

An interesting exercise is the following...  Tell someone "Spot, whom I like very much and likes to run, is a good dog, is happy, and he likes food."  Ask them to name the first thing that they learned about Spot.  Hardly anyone will say "likes to run."  Then say, "Spot likes to run.  I really like him. He's a good dog.  He's very happy, and he likes food."  Not only will most people be able to tell you the first thing, they'll be able to tell you all four things and isolate your liking of Spot as irrelevant to the question.  It looks like 2nd grade writing, but guess what?  It communicated the ideas more persuasively and effectively than the typical "good writing."
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juliemccoy

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Re: LEEWS
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2006, 07:32:23 PM »
Thanks flydog. I feel like I'm the reverse on these writing issues. Would someone with a journalism background have an advantage here? I'm writing my PS right now and having to "relearn" formal writing.
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