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Author Topic: Your advice appreciated.  (Read 4011 times)

stratagem09

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Your advice appreciated.
« on: August 17, 2004, 03:11:28 PM »
Hello all,

I'm new to this forum. But anyways, I hope to gather some advice or suggestions from you.

I recently took the June LSAT, and got a low score of 146 (30% percentile). I have been consistently getting low 160s on timed, diagnostic exams, so I dunno what happened. But I'm stick with the 146. But I still want to get into law school. I have a GPA of 3.5, go to a top 5 public school (to be specific, Berkeley), and this upcoming senior year, I will be studying abroad at Oxford. I hope this has some weight. My strength for my law school application is my personal statement, because all of my previous English/philosophy professors have commented on my extraordinary writing.

What advice do you have on me applying to law school? Obvious, Harvard or Stanford is out of the question. Is it? Chicago, Michigan, Berkeley? Would a extraordinarily-strong personal statement help me rebound? Or would you suggest me going to a state law school for one year (I read from other topics Baltimore may be a good choice), do good/great, and then transfer to a top 10 law school. Or even something else?

Any advice you have would be greatly appreciated. Oh, I won't be able to take the LSATs this upcoming year ago since I would prefer to work hard on my studies at Oxford. But it's a possibility, but slight (to re-take the LSATs). Let's just consider my 146 is final.

Thanks y'all.

stratagem09

jacy85

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Re: Your advice appreciated.
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2004, 10:54:56 PM »
General rule of thumb...

Don't attend a school you wouldn't be happy with for all 3 years.  It disturbs me how often people say "oh, I'll just go to this 'crappy' school and transfer into the top 14."  To be completely honest, your gpa decent, but not fantastic.  And neither is your lsat, obviously.  I'm definitely NOT saying that there's no way you won't be able to end up at the top 10% of your class, but just going by "index" numbers, which adcoms say helps predict first year performance, you'll very likely have an uphill battle all the way.

If you can find a state school that has a regional/local reputation that you're happy with, has programs your interested in, and is generally a school you like, then go for it, and you can always try to transfer up and see how it goes. 

I'm just saying don't count on transferring.

Freak

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Re: Your advice appreciated.
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2004, 11:08:13 PM »
Take the LSAT again, here's how most adcoms weigh the numbers 50% LSAT, 40% GPA, 10% other (personal statement etc.).  So if you really think you can do a 160 or better on the LSAT then take it again period.  If your GPA drops slightly (.25 or less) a 160 LSAT more than makes up for it even though they avg. the scores (153).
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Bman

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Re: Your advice appreciated.
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2004, 11:11:53 PM »
Where did you get this information? Everything I've heard is that the LSAT is much more important than this, with respect to the GPA (the one exception might be Boalt, but I doubt that GPA is worth eighty percent of LSAT even there).

Take the LSAT again, here's how most adcoms weigh the numbers 50% LSAT, 40% GPA, 10% other (personal statement etc.).  So if you really think you can do a 160 or better on the LSAT then take it again period.  If your GPA drops slightly (.25 or less) a 160 LSAT more than makes up for it even though they avg. the scores (153).

Bman

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Re: Your advice appreciated.
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2004, 11:12:37 PM »
By the way....I think you should study like mad and retake. If you get 160, most schools will probably just consider that score.

Freak

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Re: Your advice appreciated.
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2004, 11:21:10 PM »
Where did you hear it was more than 50%? 

I found this information from this site.
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Bman

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Re: Your advice appreciated.
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2004, 11:23:10 PM »
Some site had the percentage GPA with respect to LSAT. If I find it tomorrow, I may post.

jacy85

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Re: Your advice appreciated.
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2004, 11:23:57 PM »
Most people here seem to be of the consensus that the lsat is worth closer to 60%.  I think that comes from looking at the index numbers of schools.  The lsat at most schools is weighted much more heavily than gpa in most cases.

You can find the admissions index info on lsac's site, under the transcript section, I believe.

ghostpirate

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Re: Your advice appreciated.
« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2004, 05:41:43 PM »
Consider: The lowest possible LSAT score for an applicant to an accreditted law school is 120, meaning they have to actually take the test.
The minimum GPA is more like a 2.3, depending on the conditions for graduation.
Let's use Columbia as an example, but you can do this with any school that uses LSAC indexes by looking up the numbers on lsac.org.
LSAT mult: 0.045
GPA mult: 0.559
Starting from 120, there are 60 possible actual points (180 being 60, 150 being 30, etc.)
From 2.3, there are 2 possible points (A+ is the max)
0.045*60 = 2.7
0.559*2 = 1.118
Thus, in actuality, it's more than twice as heavily weighted because you can't apply to law school unless you graduate (most law schools anyways).

ghostpirate

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Re: Your advice appreciated.
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2004, 05:45:16 PM »
Incidentally, 50:40 is almost right for berkeley:
LSAT weight (LSAT weight divided by GPA, so this is the number of times the LSAT carries weight vs. GPA in distinguishing one applicant from the next)
2.913669065 - Boston College
3 - Boston University
1.112530336 - Berkeley
2.914285714 - Chicago
2.415026834 - Columbia
2.926829268 - Cornell
2.045454545 - Duke
1.997663551 - Northwestern
2.830188679 - USC
2.815884477 - Stanford
3.19266055 - University of Washington