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Author Topic: Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process  (Read 11341 times)

Bman

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Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process
« on: August 17, 2004, 01:24:34 PM »
If you get a chance to talk to an admissions official, it seems obvious to me that you shouldn't ask questions that you can readily look up (e.g. average LSAT scores) or questions that they will not be able to answer (your own personal chances of admission). But when you're asking them questions, is it appropriate to ask general questions about the admissions process (e.g. what sort of topics do you think work best for the personal statement) or should one confine their questions to inquiries about the school itself, rather than the admissions process.

jacy85

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Re: Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2004, 01:51:43 PM »
If you want to attend the school, don't ask stupid questions like "what should I write my PS about?"  Ask insightful questions about the schools.

If you dont' wnat to go there, and don't really give a damn what impression you make, then go ahead and ask the stupid questions, since it won't matter.

Jamigo

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Re: Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2004, 01:53:18 PM »
Ask them whatever you want. It's their job to answer questions about the process. Am I wrong?

jacy85

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Re: Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2004, 02:01:29 PM »
Actually, to qualify my "stupid questions" comment about what to write on a PS, schools have already given you a "topic" in their application.  What you write is extremely personal (or should be...) and by asking what looks good would, I think, immediately lower their opinion of you.  You should use a meeting to ask questions you came up with while looking around on campus and asking for clarifications or more details concerning things you read in the school's literature.

For a comparison, this is kind of like an interview (especially if you called and set this meeting up).  Asking what you should write on a PS is like asking during a 1st job interview what they'll be paying you and asking for details of the benefits package.  It just shouldn't be done.

If you want to attend the school, don't ask stupid questions like "what should I write my PS about?"  Ask insightful questions about the schools.

If you dont' wnat to go there, and don't really give a damn what impression you make, then go ahead and ask the stupid questions, since it won't matter.

Bman

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Re: Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2004, 03:25:24 PM »
Fair enough Jacy. I don't really want to ask questions about the admissions process. If my PS topic comes from someone else besides me, my PS likely won't be very good. The reason I asked this question was just because I wanted to make sure that it wouldn't look weird (or arrogant) if I asked all of my questions about the school and did not ask anything about the admissions process.

jacy85

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Re: Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2004, 03:30:15 PM »
No, I think you're correct in your thinking.  I mean, if you're going for an interview, they may ask you specific question about your file, or you could sort of work in an explaination about something you have concerns with, but I think for questions, you'd make a much better impression asking about other stuff.  Montauk has some good examples of somethings to ask, which is a good starting point for coming up with questions of your own.

BAFF213

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Re: Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2004, 05:26:24 PM »
No, I think you're correct in your thinking.  I mean, if you're going for an interview, they may ask you specific question about your file, or you could sort of work in an explaination about something you have concerns with, but I think for questions, you'd make a much better impression asking about other stuff.  Montauk has some good examples of somethings to ask, which is a good starting point for coming up with questions of your own.

explanation

some things

and montauk's a feminine hygiene product

jacy85

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Re: Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2004, 06:33:59 PM »
You're a feminine hygiene product

BAFF213

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Re: Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2004, 06:46:02 PM »
You're a feminine hygiene product

no hard feelings - i just don't like him.  here is a review of montauk's "how to get into the top law schools" from amazon.com.  i didnt write this but i think this person is right on with what he/she is saying.


Fluff - not worth purchasing, March 16, 2004
   
Reviewer:         A reader
One cant really expect to gain an unbiased opinion about law school admissions from someone who stopped practicing law, made a transition into management consulting, and then started an admissions consulting business.

Regardless of what Mr. Montauk says, there is no definite "method" that will secure you admission into a top law school. Great grades and high LSAT scores are a must. You dont need to purchase his book in order to know that. Other "intangibles" affect the admissions process, but they dont carry as much weight as academics. Nobody knows what the admissions officers like to see except the admissions officers themselves. However, I agree that one should focus on their unique qualities when applying. (Keep in mind that what you think is unique may not be unique to admissions officers.)

Mr. Montauk selfishly feeds on the anxities of today's money hungry and ambtition driven students to fatten his own pockets. I find it ironic that Montauk criticizes students who want to attend law school in order to pursue lucrative careers in corporate law when that is exactly what he did. I wonder if he dediced to enter consulting because, he "is fascinated by the quandry of modern business" or that he started an admissions consulting business because, he "is truly interested in helping students".

I wonder what Mr. Montauk wrote when he applied to Stanford. It was probably some false rhetoric about how he admires justice or some bogus anecdote. He should have just written a letter to Stanford saying the following "Dear Stanford, Please admit me so I can padden my credentials, eventually make a transition into a lucrative field, and feed off of the insecurity of others".

Mr. Montauk's book exemplifies everything that is wrong with today's hyper-competitive admissions process. IF you dont make your dream law school, dont worry, you wont starve. You can still have a rewarding career as well.

jacy85

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Re: Asking Admissions Officials about Admissions Process
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2004, 06:54:07 PM »
Oh, I don't care what you think about Montauk.  That'd be a huge waste of my time.  A lot of his advice is common sense stuff, and it's just a helpful reference.  I didn't read it to get into a top school.  I got it for general info.

I was calling you a feminine hygiene product for correcting my spelling on a stupid message board.

You're a feminine hygiene product

no hard feelings - i just don't like him.  here is a review of montauk's "how to get into the top law schools" from amazon.com.  i didnt write this but i think this person is right on with what he/she is saying.


Fluff - not worth purchasing, March 16, 2004
   
Reviewer:         A reader
One cant really expect to gain an unbiased opinion about law school admissions from someone who stopped practicing law, made a transition into management consulting, and then started an admissions consulting business.

Regardless of what Mr. Montauk says, there is no definite "method" that will secure you admission into a top law school. Great grades and high LSAT scores are a must. You dont need to purchase his book in order to know that. Other "intangibles" affect the admissions process, but they dont carry as much weight as academics. Nobody knows what the admissions officers like to see except the admissions officers themselves. However, I agree that one should focus on their unique qualities when applying. (Keep in mind that what you think is unique may not be unique to admissions officers.)

Mr. Montauk selfishly feeds on the anxities of today's money hungry and ambtition driven students to fatten his own pockets. I find it ironic that Montauk criticizes students who want to attend law school in order to pursue lucrative careers in corporate law when that is exactly what he did. I wonder if he dediced to enter consulting because, he "is fascinated by the quandry of modern business" or that he started an admissions consulting business because, he "is truly interested in helping students".

I wonder what Mr. Montauk wrote when he applied to Stanford. It was probably some false rhetoric about how he admires justice or some bogus anecdote. He should have just written a letter to Stanford saying the following "Dear Stanford, Please admit me so I can padden my credentials, eventually make a transition into a lucrative field, and feed off of the insecurity of others".

Mr. Montauk's book exemplifies everything that is wrong with today's hyper-competitive admissions process. IF you dont make your dream law school, dont worry, you wont starve. You can still have a rewarding career as well.