Law School Discussion

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Author Topic: National Law School  (Read 13760 times)

redemption

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Re: National Law School
« Reply #70 on: July 05, 2006, 12:21:45 PM »
You and I agree except on two points: [1] I'm not absolutely certain that NLS is a scam, although it certainly looks that way from the manner in which it is presented (I favor, as I have indicated to the OP, transparency over evasive marketing language); and [2] I think that private sector solutions of this kind can work -- I have much, much less faith than you do in "educationalists and social planners".

1) The hallmarks of a scam are all here.  It's not just transparency that I'm looking for but an ability to respond to criticism, and a demonstration that NLS is actually dedicated to these issues and is actively charting this course, opposed to trying to get people to sign up and pay first, with answers to come.  Without any reputation, and with the history of scams (like the one previously referenced) I think NLS would have a vested interest in proving legitimacy.  I don't see it.

2) I never said anything about public/private here and I think that the private sector will most likely have to lead the way.  Social planners and educationalists are often in the private sector in addition to the not-for-profit sector (like the law schools that you, I, and just about everyone else on this board will be attending).  However, these are not the private sector actors you are looking for.

These are fair points. I agree with all of them.

redemption

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Re: National Law School
« Reply #71 on: July 05, 2006, 01:13:12 PM »
I just don't buy into the concept of this school somehow throwing down all the barriers that "guard" the legal profession.  I said that the ABA guards the profession like the DMV guards the streets, and he responded that it wasn't even the ABA and its monopoly over the legal profession that guards it, it's time and money constraints that society imposes upon people.

WTF?  I mean, where does it end?  If you can't make the sacrifice of time and money, why should the bar be lowered to accomodate you?  At a certain point, will the barriers be lowered to the point that any jackass off the street can pay $50 for a lawyer's license?  I'd like to think that our profession will remain more relevant than that.

Ow, my head.

redemption

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Re: National Law School
« Reply #72 on: July 05, 2006, 01:25:07 PM »

John Galt

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Re: National Law School
« Reply #73 on: July 05, 2006, 02:09:26 PM »
Personally, I think any school ranked lower than Penn should be closed.


Penn Troll :P

SCgrad

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Re: National Law School
« Reply #74 on: July 06, 2006, 04:54:14 AM »
Maybe some are being too hard on the OP, but if he can't defend the harshest criticism, that is more telling than his shady website (haven't looked, but trusting trusted posters).  The only reason I said he was a tool is because he seems to begrudge those who go to or are going to schools and spending 150,000, as if it is on a whim.  And he seems to be employing the "I'm older and experienced so I am right" argument that most of us just won't let slide.

I know it is hard to pump up a program like this without trying to belittle "top programs," but that tactic is an exercise in futility and will be met as such every time on LSD.

burnt scott

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Re: National Law School
« Reply #75 on: July 09, 2006, 06:11:20 PM »
Maybe some are being too hard on the OP, but if he can't defend the harshest criticism, that is more telling than his shady website (haven't looked, but trusting trusted posters).  The only reason I said he was a tool is because he seems to begrudge those who go to or are going to schools and spending 150,000, as if it is on a wimb.  And he seems to be employing the "I'm older and experienced so I am right" argument that most of us just won't let slide.

I know it is hard to pump up a program like this without trying to belittle "top programs," but that tactic is an exercise in futility and will be met as such every time on LSD.

"V"

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Re: National Law School
« Reply #76 on: July 09, 2006, 11:19:47 PM »
We do fill a niche that is wanted in society.

so do casinos.  again, hardly compelling.

I know I'm way behind. But this reply PWNED. May god grant you an extra halo in heaven.

SCgrad

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Re: National Law School
« Reply #77 on: July 10, 2006, 01:16:47 AM »
Maybe some are being too hard on the OP, but if he can't defend the harshest criticism, that is more telling than his shady website (haven't looked, but trusting trusted posters).  The only reason I said he was a tool is because he seems to begrudge those who go to or are going to schools and spending 150,000, as if it is on a wimb.  And he seems to be employing the "I'm older and experienced so I am right" argument that most of us just won't let slide.

I know it is hard to pump up a program like this without trying to belittle "top programs," but that tactic is an exercise in futility and will be met as such every time on LSD.

i fixed it.  yeah, yeah, i can't spell for *&^%.

nationallaw

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Re: National Law School
« Reply #78 on: July 13, 2006, 03:57:44 AM »
Has anyone see the virtual poker rooms? (party poker, poker stars, etc)  Why can that not be done to ensure the Socratic Method is used.  Imagine you are in a seat in law school, you can see your professor, they can see you, you can see other students.  You can even break into groups, talk amond yourselves, ask questions which the rest of the class can hear and be answered immediatly by the professor.

I plan to totally replicate the law school environment.  Oh and of course, live deposition technology.  A court reporter uses her steno to type out the transcripts of the class in real time.  You can annotate them, take notes, hightliight stuff etc.  It is all linked to the live class, you can go and review it etc.

Look at how many schools are adding elearning platforms?  The developer of that platform is in great shape, and we just happen to know 100 Indian guys willing to do the job.

We all appreciate your comments and concerns, everyone at National is dedicated to this law school, the software we will build and our ability to bring all education to those who want and desire it.

Doug

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Re: National Law School
« Reply #79 on: July 13, 2006, 04:05:25 AM »
Has anyone see the virtual poker rooms? (party poker, poker stars, etc)  Why can that not be done to ensure the Socratic Method is used.  Imagine you are in a seat in law school, you can see your professor, they can see you, you can see other students.  You can even break into groups, talk amond yourselves, ask questions which the rest of the class can hear and be answered immediatly by the professor.

I plan to totally replicate the law school environment.  Oh and of course, live deposition technology.  A court reporter uses her steno to type out the transcripts of the class in real time.  You can annotate them, take notes, hightliight stuff etc.  It is all linked to the live class, you can go and review it etc.

Look at how many schools are adding elearning platforms?  The developer of that platform is in great shape, and we just happen to know 100 Indian guys willing to do the job.

We all appreciate your comments and concerns, everyone at National is dedicated to this law school, the software we will build and our ability to bring all education to those who want and desire it.

Doug

Just to be clear, the mental image you're aiming to compare your law school to is a virtual poker room?