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Author Topic: How indicative are LSAT scores really?  (Read 1557 times)

pmegan

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How indicative are LSAT scores really?
« on: June 29, 2006, 10:15:03 PM »
Everyone knows that the SAT and the GRE are total scams that don't have any correlation with college/grad school success... but how indicative are LSAT scores of first year performance? 

Just to be clear: let's say you work your best, without necessarily forgoing all of life.  You go to class, you do the reading every night.  But you don't go overboard, and you don't even buy a highlighter.

If your LSAT scores are significantly higher than the 75% median, is it pretty likely that you're going to breeze through the school without backbreaking effort and still be able to stay in the top 10%?  Or are the LSAT's just a nice little way that admissions officers have found makes their job really easy?

Officer Rod Farva

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Re: How indicative are LSAT scores really?
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2006, 10:32:59 PM »
A highlighter? What the f*** are you talking about?
LSD saved my life.

johnnydavis

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Re: How indicative are LSAT scores really?
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2006, 10:43:19 PM »
you're beating a dead horse.

Flyboy

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Re: How indicative are LSAT scores really?
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2006, 11:07:07 PM »
I always thought the line was "Sing it again rookie beeyotch.

SCgrad

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Re: How indicative are LSAT scores really?
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2006, 04:04:41 AM »
Everyone knows that the SAT and the GRE are total scams that don't have any correlation with college/grad school success... but how indicative are LSAT scores of first year performance? 

Just to be clear: let's say you work your best, without necessarily forgoing all of life.  You go to class, you do the reading every night.  But you don't go overboard, and you don't even buy a highlighter.

If your LSAT scores are significantly higher than the 75% median, is it pretty likely that you're going to breeze through the school without backbreaking effort and still be able to stay in the top 10%?  Or are the LSAT's just a nice little way that admissions officers have found makes their job really easy?

i found this funny.  and yes, the horse is done been dead for a while now.

 note- you can do a google search to find the statistical percentage.  i forget what it is, but apparantly it is what statisticians call "significant". 

krumanadi

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Re: How indicative are LSAT scores really?
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2006, 04:31:32 AM »
This again?

Everyones different.  Some people with high LSATS will breeze, and some will not.  Some with low LSATS will breeze, and again, some will not.


Officer Rod Farva

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Re: How indicative are LSAT scores really?
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2006, 12:08:59 PM »
I always thought the line was "Sing it again rookie beeyotch.

You know, I think you're right. I have shamed the Ramrod dojo.  :'(
LSD saved my life.

paigeroo

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Re: How indicative are LSAT scores really?
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2006, 08:16:29 PM »
Everyone knows that the SAT and the GRE are total scams that don't have any correlation with college/grad school success... but how indicative are LSAT scores of first year performance? 

Just to be clear: let's say you work your best, without necessarily forgoing all of life.  You go to class, you do the reading every night.  But you don't go overboard, and you don't even buy a highlighter.

If your LSAT scores are significantly higher than the 75% median, is it pretty likely that you're going to breeze through the school without backbreaking effort and still be able to stay in the top 10%?  Or are the LSAT's just a nice little way that admissions officers have found makes their job really easy?

Poor thing.  Just practice.  It'll come to you.

BoscoBreaux

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Re: How indicative are LSAT scores really?
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2006, 04:29:12 PM »
Everyone knows that the SAT and the GRE are total scams that don't have any correlation with college/grad school success... but how indicative are LSAT scores of first year performance? 

In short, for an individual, whether you get a great LSAT or a mediocre one will bear little on your grades.

LSATs are indicative in the same way that SATs, or an intelligence test, or even a timed New York Times crossword puzzle would be–each tries to test one’s ability to think under pressure. What they cannot do is test drive, interest, commitment, and the variety of other intangible things that bear 5 times as much relevance to performance on law school exams than does intelligence (albeit a special type of intelligence).

Over thousands of persons, the thousands who get 160s will do better than the group that gets 155, but that is because since the intangibles are evenly distributed among the masses, and the only true tangible element left to consider is the LSAT score.

The truth is whether you like your professors or not, whether you fall in love or out of love, or whether you think your school has bad food will have more impact on your grades as to whether you snuck in a few lucky guesses on the LSAT. Love, bad food, and sadistic professors are not any more of less likely to afflict 160s than 150s, so hence the remnant LSAT differential.

In my experience, there were plenty of 168s who were at the bottom of the class, and plenty of 152s who were stars. All worked reasonably hard, studied, and took the work seriously. But, I am sure if the entire school was considered, over 1,000 students you'd see a coorelation. But over a dozen or so, none.

slacker

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Re: How indicative are LSAT scores really?
« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2006, 11:02:53 PM »
LSAT is perfect indicative of, in general, whether or not you'll get into law school and, to an extent, which school you'll get into. How or whether this correlates to intelligence is a wholly different matter.