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Author Topic: New law school ranking for SPLITTERS  (Read 2031 times)

denk

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New law school ranking for SPLITTERS
« on: June 29, 2006, 05:31:54 PM »
Hi all,

I've created a new law school ranking site and blog.  I'd appreciate any feedback on it:

  http://lawschool.greenfabric.com/rankings/splitter-rankings

I decided to make my own site because I'm really into math, and I'm also kind of annoyed by a lot of the rankings that are out there - for the usual reasons.  My goals are (1) to create new reports / rankings with useful information, and (2) to be scientific and open about my data sources, metholodgy, etc.

Thanks in advance!

doublec

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Re: New law school ranking for SPLITTERS
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2006, 11:40:48 AM »
Pretty cool

Jolie Was Here

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Re: New law school ranking for SPLITTERS
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2006, 11:50:13 AM »
denk, that's really interesting.  Thanks for posting the link (not to mention taking the time to do all that painstaking work!)
I was referring to your intellectual penis. Which is quite robust.

Jolie is creeping up on me. 

Alamo

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Re: New law school ranking for SPLITTERS
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2006, 11:50:02 AM »
I really like the concept.  However, what are you using for "XLSAT" and "XGPA"?  Looking at your Emory example, I couldn't really tell.

Also, I think of W&L as being a school that emphasizes LSAT over GPA, but didn't see it on here.

Also, do you have a link to the Admission Index Information Sheet that's backing this up?  I couldn't find it on LSAC and would really like to see it - although I'm not a hard-core math geek, I have a soft spot for statistics :)
I must admit that I may have been infected with society's prejudices and predilections and attributed them to God . . . and that in years hence I may be seen as someone who was on the wrong side of history.  I don't believe such doubts make me a bad Christian.  I believe they make me human . . .

denk

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Re: New law school ranking for SPLITTERS
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2006, 04:46:11 PM »
thanks, how did you go about this??  Just plugged in numbers from the LSAT and GPA 25-75 %iles???

Also, I dunno if this was supposed to be a complete list, but there are schools missing

At the bottom of the page, I have a "Methodology" section.  There are some schools missing because they weren't in the original data set.

denk

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Re: New law school ranking for SPLITTERS
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2006, 04:49:34 PM »
I really like the concept.  However, what are you using for "XLSAT" and "XGPA"?  Looking at your Emory example, I couldn't really tell.

Also, I think of W&L as being a school that emphasizes LSAT over GPA, but didn't see it on here.

Also, do you have a link to the Admission Index Information Sheet that's backing this up?  I couldn't find it on LSAC and would really like to see it - although I'm not a hard-core math geek, I have a soft spot for statistics :)

Thanks for the feedback.  Here's the original data source:

  http://os.lsac.org/release/MyDocuments/mydocs_AdmissionIndex.aspx

I'll update my page with it.  It may be that W&L doesn't use the "Index" system. (?)  I'll add some text to make it clear that not all schools do this.

Alamo

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Re: New law school ranking for SPLITTERS
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2006, 05:49:00 PM »
I really like the concept.  However, what are you using for "XLSAT" and "XGPA"?  Looking at your Emory example, I couldn't really tell.

Also, I think of W&L as being a school that emphasizes LSAT over GPA, but didn't see it on here.

Also, do you have a link to the Admission Index Information Sheet that's backing this up?  I couldn't find it on LSAC and would really like to see it - although I'm not a hard-core math geek, I have a soft spot for statistics :)

Thanks for the feedback.  Here's the original data source:

  http://os.lsac.org/release/MyDocuments/mydocs_AdmissionIndex.aspx

I'll update my page with it.  It may be that W&L doesn't use the "Index" system. (?)  I'll add some text to make it clear that not all schools do this.

You're right - W&L doesn't use an index.  Here's an interesting LSAC search result (although it lacks the broader applicability of your system) on entering student statistics (done from this page: http://officialguide.lsac.org/search/cgi-bin/KeyFact.asp?Group=2):

75%-LSAT > 165
2.75 < 25%-GPA < 3.25

SCHOOLS                                     
Cardozo School of Law                     166   3.19
George Mason University School of Law    166   3.15
University of Illinois College of Law    167   3.04
Washington University School of Law (St. Louis)    167   3.2
Washington & Lee   166 3.25

OK - I had to add the last one in manually, since W&L's 25%ile GPA is 3.25 exactly.


At the other end of the spectrum, the following search emphasized low LSAT, high GPA schools:

25%-LSAT < 155
75%-GPA > 3.7
25%-GPA > 3.2

SCHOOLS                                
Indiana University School of Law—Indianapolis    152   3.76   3.32
University of Kansas School of Law    154   3.77   3.27
The University of Mississippi School of Law    151   3.77   3.26
University of Nebraska College of Law    153   3.83   3.3
University of North Dakota School of Law    147   3.74   3.25
University of Oklahoma College of Law    154   3.76   3.32
University of Puerto Rico School of Law    142   3.81   3.34
Saint Louis University School of Law    154   3.77   3.35
Stetson University College of Law    152   3.71   3.28
Texas Tech University School of Law    151   3.75   3.28
Wayne State University Law School    153   3.72   3.33
I must admit that I may have been infected with society's prejudices and predilections and attributed them to God . . . and that in years hence I may be seen as someone who was on the wrong side of history.  I don't believe such doubts make me a bad Christian.  I believe they make me human . . .

denk

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Re: New law school ranking for SPLITTERS
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2006, 05:50:28 PM »
Here's what LSAC says:

The Admission Index
Some law schools combine your LSAT score and GPA to produce an index number to assist them in the admission process. An index number is provided on the LSDAS Law School Report for LSDAS-requiring law schools that choose to have one reported. You can calculate what index number will be reported for each LSAT score by using the values listed in the Admission Index Information Sheet. You should be aware that the index number reported to law schools may differ if a school changes their index formula after we have made this report available to you. You should contact each school to which you apply if you have questions about how it uses the index number in the
admission process.

An admission index is produced by (1) multiplying the LSAT score by some constant (A); (2) multiplying the GPA by some constant (B); and (3) adding the sum of these two quantities to a third constant (C). In symbols, Index = [(A) x (LSAT)] + [(B) x (GPA)] + C. The values of the constants A, B, and C, as selected by individual law schools, are listed on the Admission Index Information Sheet. The values of the constants selected by particular law schools may change from time to time at the request of the school. If you have more than one LSAT score and an average LSAT score is reported, an index number will also be reported using the average LSAT score. Not all law schools use these formulas, and those that do use index numbers do not necessarily use them in the same way. An index number calculated by LSAC is not the exclusive means by which a law school may combine data reflected on the law school report and/or other data. The absenceof a law school from the Admission Index Information Sheet does not mean that some calculations are or are not made by the school receiving the law school report.

denk

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Re: New law school ranking for SPLITTERS
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2006, 05:58:10 PM »
You're right - W&L doesn't use an index.  Here's an interesting LSAC search result (although it lacks the broader applicability of your system)...

Yes, one difference I see is that you're using absolute values for LSAT and GPA.  For better or for worse, my ranking uses only relative values.  So for example,  Vermont is listed in the "high-LSAT" category.  This does NOT mean that they search for a high LSAT per se, but rather that they weigh the LSAT more highly than the GPA.

Alamo

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Re: New law school ranking for SPLITTERS
« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2006, 08:10:30 AM »
You're right - W&L doesn't use an index.  Here's an interesting LSAC search result (although it lacks the broader applicability of your system)...

Yes, one difference I see is that you're using absolute values for LSAT and GPA.  For better or for worse, my ranking uses only relative values.  So for example,  Vermont is listed in the "high-LSAT" category.  This does NOT mean that they search for a high LSAT per se, but rather that they weigh the LSAT more highly than the GPA.

Also, yours is based in the scientific method, while mine simply posts results of a random search ;) 

If I felt like digging up historical data, it might show something meaningful trends, but the chances of me going to that much effort are pretty slim.
I must admit that I may have been infected with society's prejudices and predilections and attributed them to God . . . and that in years hence I may be seen as someone who was on the wrong side of history.  I don't believe such doubts make me a bad Christian.  I believe they make me human . . .