Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Black People Afraid of Black People/ Fatherless Homes  (Read 9146 times)

pikey

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 11104
  • Did ya do it? Then why are ya sorry?
    • View Profile
Re: Black People Afraid of Black People
« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2006, 01:30:56 PM »
This is exactly the reaction I got from some of my ppls when I applied to several black law schools.  They just didn't see why/how I could possibly want to be at a school "like that"  WTF?!?!

My parents have always said to go to the best school that you can (best for you, not best rankings), not best black school.  I never had a lack of black people growing up on an island that 60% black!  Now that I've been to school in the US I can appreciate the value of HBCU's.  It's definitely a great experience (and the top ones have excellent recruiting opportunities).  I was kinda mad when I got to sr year and realised the more wall street companies recruited at Morehouse than at Emory.  ;)
The noobs are so into themsleves you'd think they allready have offers at Tool, Tool, feminine hygiene product & Dumbass LLC

lsn

Young Esq.

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
  • B-More Careful
    • View Profile
Re: Black People Afraid of Black People
« Reply #11 on: June 28, 2006, 01:31:52 PM »
This is exactly the reaction I got from some of my ppls when I applied to several black law schools.  They just didn't see why/how I could possibly want to be at a school "like that"  WTF?!?!

I applied to two black law schools NCCU (even though NCCU is like 45% white) and Howard.  Both school's have great alumni bases.  The bottom line is your school should be based on what you want to do with your degree and not the rank of the school.  Haters want to talk but remember more people get rejected from Law School than accepted so wherever you go you will be alright.  If they ain't paying your bills then "SHAKE THEM HATERS OFF"!

cui bono?

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4036
  • blah bliggetty blah
    • View Profile
Re: Black People Afraid of Black People
« Reply #12 on: June 28, 2006, 01:35:21 PM »
Man I have shaken them off!  Exactly why I went ahead & applied to MORE black law schools! Hhaha  guess I'm kinda stubborn.  :D  Got rejected tho (well from most)- so I guess it's a moot point  :-\ :D

Howard rejected me with the quickness!  Got accepted into 2 other black schools tho ;D
I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality...  I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word - -Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King

Special Agent Dana Scully

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8991
  • aka MCB
    • View Profile
Re: Black People Afraid of Black People
« Reply #13 on: June 28, 2006, 01:44:43 PM »
Hmm...interesting topic.

Like Tiff, I'm from Brooklyn too, so there was no lack of black and/or west indian people around me growing up.  I BARELY went to school with any white kids.  Thus, I didn't want to go to an HBCU  for that reason (and a few others).  I felt that I wanted to be around a more diverse population, bc that's how the world is.

Of course, my UG is filled with rich people, mostly white, but many people of color came from wealthy families as well.  One of my closest friend was wealthy (black female), but her closest friends (the ones you tell your business to0 were black; but, she basically hung out with everyone. (she did go to a private school with a majority white pop, so she's very comfortable around white people for the most part).

Yet, I knew this other black girl who was wealthy (went to Andover and everything) who would not hang around black people for anything, nor would she join any cultural groups bc she felt that she would be "marginalized".  I kid you not people.

So...it's different spectrums, I suppose.
Columbia 3L

PaddyWack

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 69
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Black People Afraid of Black People
« Reply #14 on: June 28, 2006, 02:34:49 PM »
I agree with OES.  It's not a matter of fear, really (except for the terminally ignorant and self-loathing), but more an issue of comfort.

I'm pretty comfortable around most people, but I seem to be the most uncomfortable about american blacks.  Individually, we can be as comfortable with each other as anyone else.  But people are different when they are in groups, and it's only when I'm around large groups of american black people that I feel somewhat uncomfortable.  I must not be the only one feeling uncomfortable because I'll catch funny looks all the time if I'm walking in a ghetto area and I'm not dressed like one of the locals.

I use the qualifier "american black" because, as has been said here, culture plays a huge part.  The culture of carribbean blacks is very different from the culture of american blacks.  I moved from Jamaica to a very upscale, all white neighborhood.  I didn't have any contact with other blacks for 5 years (7-12 yrs old), and then moved to Jersey City.  By then it was mostly too late.  I had absolutely nothing in common with most of the black kids I saw around me, even though I thought some of them were cool as hell.  The only black kid I spent time with was from Ghana, and he felt similarly displaced.

So, I mean there are reasons why some blacks don't gravitate towards other blacks, and it doesn't have to be fear or elitism.  Sometimes there's resistance on both sides, and it's easier to just move along.  People become friends with whoever they become friends with for the same reason as everyone else: the need to belong.

Speaking as a person on the other side of the fence, though, I'll say that it sometimes troubles me that I feel so disconnected from others of my race, mainly because it's often seen as an affront to the black race, a problem either of my creation or society's, rather than simply as a consequence of being me.

Hybrid Vigor

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1930
  • prestigious
    • View Profile
Re: Black People Afraid of Black People
« Reply #15 on: June 28, 2006, 02:38:46 PM »
I agree with OES.  It's not a matter of fear, really (except for the terminally ignorant and self-loathing), but more an issue of comfort.

I'm pretty comfortable around most people, but I seem to be the most uncomfortable about american blacks.  Individually, we can be as comfortable with each other as anyone else.  But people are different when they are in groups, and it's only when I'm around large groups of american black people that I feel somewhat uncomfortable.  I must not be the only one feeling uncomfortable because I'll catch funny looks all the time if I'm walking in a ghetto area and I'm not dressed like one of the locals.


For me, this sentence explains why you don't feel comfy around Black people.
Die Luft der Freiheit weht

pikey

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 11104
  • Did ya do it? Then why are ya sorry?
    • View Profile
Re: Black People Afraid of Black People
« Reply #16 on: June 28, 2006, 02:47:00 PM »
I agree with OES.  It's not a matter of fear, really (except for the terminally ignorant and self-loathing), but more an issue of comfort.

I'm pretty comfortable around most people, but I seem to be the most uncomfortable about american blacks.  Individually, we can be as comfortable with each other as anyone else.  But people are different when they are in groups, and it's only when I'm around large groups of american black people that I feel somewhat uncomfortable.  I must not be the only one feeling uncomfortable because I'll catch funny looks all the time if I'm walking in a ghetto area and I'm not dressed like one of the locals.

I use the qualifier "american black" because, as has been said here, culture plays a huge part.  The culture of carribbean blacks is very different from the culture of american blacks.  I moved from Jamaica to a very upscale, all white neighborhood.  I didn't have any contact with other blacks for 5 years (7-12 yrs old), and then moved to Jersey City.  By then it was mostly too late.  I had absolutely nothing in common with most of the black kids I saw around me, even though I thought some of them were cool as hell.  The only black kid I spent time with was from Ghana, and he felt similarly displaced.

So, I mean there are reasons why some blacks don't gravitate towards other blacks, and it doesn't have to be fear or elitism.  Sometimes there's resistance on both sides, and it's easier to just move along.  People become friends with whoever they become friends with for the same reason as everyone else: the need to belong.

Speaking as a person on the other side of the fence, though, I'll say that it sometimes troubles me that I feel so disconnected from others of my race, mainly because it's often seen as an affront to the black race, a problem either of my creation or society's, rather than simply as a consequence of being me.

I think that this is a form of ignorance as well (not that I'm saying you're ignorant).  I spent my entire life in Bermuda, yet I am comfortable with both American and Caribbean blacks.  If one can find similarities with middle class whites why can't one find similarities with middle class blacks?

As a foreigner, I'd say that a lot of foreign Black buy into the stereotypes of black america.  My mom said something the other day about how black people in America are all about negative things, and she's an educated woman who's been all over the US (ie not ignorant).  That can be part of the reason why foreigners don't feel comfortable with american blacks.  They think that american blacks are negative towards them, but maybe they are only responding to the (possibly subconsious) negative vibe that you are sending.

As for the ghetto thing, that's more about class then culture.  I know many people born and raised in the US who feel uncomfortable in the ghetto.  Shoot, I don't feel comfortable in the ghetto (unless I'm getting my hair done  ;)).  Seek out the 'talented tenth' if you don't feel comfortable with the round the way girl.  Comfort is all about what you're used to.  The more you hang with black americans, the more you'll be used to them, and the more comfortable you'll be.
The noobs are so into themsleves you'd think they allready have offers at Tool, Tool, feminine hygiene product & Dumbass LLC

lsn

BDix

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Black People Afraid of Black People
« Reply #17 on: June 28, 2006, 02:51:34 PM »
For me, it's not so much of an issue of being afraid of other Black People. I feel like it's being afraid to be myself sometimes. I grew up in the military and my parents were from an all black community in Georgia. Whenever I'd go visit I'd get made fun of for "talking like a white boy", so I felt like I had to put up a front to avoid this. Now that I'm at a majority white school in the Midwest and I feel the same way - like I have to talk differently around some black people or dress differently. Sometimes I just feel rejected because I grew up differently than others. So, it's not that I'm afraid or ashamed  of the race, but sometimes it's like the rift b/t classes makes it hard to feel accepted.

Young Esq.

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
  • B-More Careful
    • View Profile
Re: Black People Afraid of Black People
« Reply #18 on: June 28, 2006, 02:53:26 PM »
 Seek out the 'talented tenth' if you don't feel comfortable with the round the way girl.  

I need me one of them!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

"Standing at the bus stop sucking on a loli pop" Yes Lawd!!!!

[*It brings a tear*]

Young Esq.

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
  • B-More Careful
    • View Profile
Re: Black People Afraid of Black People
« Reply #19 on: June 28, 2006, 02:56:03 PM »
For me, it's not so much of an issue of being afraid of other Black People. I feel like it's being afraid to be myself sometimes. I grew up in the military and my parents were from an all black community in Georgia. Whenever I'd go visit I'd get made fun of for "talking like a white boy", so I felt like I had to put up a front to avoid this. Now that I'm at a majority white school in the Midwest and I feel the same way - like I have to talk differently around some black people or dress differently. Sometimes I just feel rejected because I grew up differently than others. So, it's not that I'm afraid or ashamed  of the race, but sometimes it's like the rift b/t classes makes it hard to feel accepted.

I understad, but when you learn to form your own identity and be comortable within your own skin others wil respect you.  Love for yourself brings with it a swagger that people respect no matter if it is outside of the norm.