Law School Discussion

When to take the LSAT?

When to take the LSAT?
« on: June 20, 2006, 01:56:22 PM »
Since I want to go to law school after undergrad, when should I consider taking the LSAT? Do people usually take it junior year or senior year of undergrad? Assuming, of course, that i don't plan to take any time off in b/w undergrad and law schoool (except for summer, of course. lol)

pikey

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Re: When to take the LSAT?
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2006, 02:01:25 PM »
Since I want to go to law school after undergrad, when should I consider taking the LSAT? Do people usually take it junior year or senior year of undergrad? Assuming, of course, that i don't plan to take any time off in b/w undergrad and law schoool (except for summer, of course. lol)

I think taking it in June is ideal, because you can get it out of the way early and spend the rest of the summer concentrating on your apps.  You'll also have a better idea of where you can apply based on your numbers.  You'll also have time to retest if you hate your score.  That said, don't take it before you're ready.

If you don't have enough time to devote to prep, wait till Oct and use the summer to prep.  It is possible to attend school and prep, I was working ft and still managed my self-prep.  The drawback of Oct is that you may miss some early deadlines and you will have to get apps ready before knowing your lsat score, which is likely to affect what schools you apply to.

I don't suggest waiting until December, because then you will be applying pretty late in the cycle.

cassise

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Re: When to take the LSAT?
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2006, 10:06:58 PM »
The normal response is June after your Junior year, but in the the new ABA takes he highest score thing changes all that.  I really think this forces everybody to take it three times regardless of how happy they are, with this in mind I suggest September, October and December of your Junior year.  This way you can essentially prep once for all three since they are close together.

rtqw

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Re: When to take the LSAT?
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2006, 10:44:09 PM »
The normal response is June after your Junior year, but in the the new ABA takes he highest score thing changes all that.  I really think this forces everybody to take it three times regardless of how happy they are, with this in mind I suggest September, October and December of your Junior year.  This way you can essentially prep once for all three since they are close together.

You can't take the test in September and October, there's either a late September test or an early October test, not both.

Regardless, I think taking the LSAT when you've had two years and a month of a college education is too early. I know I took a lot more higher level classes junior year, and I think they equipped me to do better on the LSAT. I'd suggest February of junior year at the earliest if you must take it three times (can also take it the following June and September).

245

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Re: When to take the LSAT?
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2006, 11:47:30 PM »
The normal response is June after your Junior year, but in the the new ABA takes he highest score thing changes all that.  I really think this forces everybody to take it three times regardless of how happy they are, with this in mind I suggest September, October and December of your Junior year.  This way you can essentially prep once for all three since they are close together.

I don't understand why anyone would *plan* to take the test three times.  Why not just study hard and prepare well so that you only have to take it once--and possibly take it a second time if you're unhappy with the first score.

There's no use in planning to take the LSAT multiple times just because they're not averaging it anymore, and there's no reason to take the test unprepared just so that you can get an extra test score under your belt.

pikey

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Re: When to take the LSAT?
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2006, 07:58:15 AM »
The normal response is June after your Junior year, but in the the new ABA takes he highest score thing changes all that.  I really think this forces everybody to take it three times regardless of how happy they are, with this in mind I suggest September, October and December of your Junior year.  This way you can essentially prep once for all three since they are close together.

I don't understand why anyone would *plan* to take the test three times.  Why not just study hard and prepare well so that you only have to take it once--and possibly take it a second time if you're unhappy with the first score.

There's no use in planning to take the LSAT multiple times just because they're not averaging it anymore, and there's no reason to take the test unprepared just so that you can get an extra test score under your belt.

TITCR.  The advice that you should plan to take it once still stands, there's just less pressure if you have to retake. 
Firstly, nobody has clearly established that AdComms are taking the highest score.  At this point we only know that LSAC has changes their recommendations. 
Secondly, even if they are looking at the highest score, if it comes down to two apps of similar scores and one app has only taken the LSAT once, they'd probably choose that app over one who has taken it multiple times.

Take it in June (preferable) or September after your jr year, (ie when you're a 'rising' or current sr).

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Re: When to take the LSAT?
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2006, 11:43:26 AM »
I disagree that you should still plan to take it once.  If you high score is what counts then scoring lower doesn't hurt you and not taking again gives up an advantage.  Even if you think your score is awsome and the best you can do you should still retake under the new policy because 1. it has no drawback and 2. it has a significant benefit.

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Re: When to take the LSAT?
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2006, 12:08:25 PM »
I disagree that you should still plan to take it once.  If you high score is what counts then scoring lower doesn't hurt you and not taking again gives up an advantage.  Even if you think your score is awsome and the best you can do you should still retake under the new policy because 1. it has no drawback and 2. it has a significant benefit.

But it hasn't yet been determined that the high score is what counts.  Individual schools haven't come out and said that they will take the high scores yet.  You shouldn't plan a test taking strategy on what may or may not happen.

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Re: When to take the LSAT?
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2006, 12:41:37 PM »
I disagree that you should still plan to take it once.  If you high score is what counts then scoring lower doesn't hurt you and not taking again gives up an advantage.  Even if you think your score is awsome and the best you can do you should still retake under the new policy because 1. it has no drawback and 2. it has a significant benefit.

But it hasn't yet been determined that the high score is what counts.  Individual schools haven't come out and said that they will take the high scores yet.  You shouldn't plan a test taking strategy on what may or may not happen.

I agree with MoniLi.  We don't know what all schools (or even most schools) think yet, or how they will respond to individuals with multiple score vs. one test score.  In fact, it looks like many schools are still taking averages or preferring a single test score to multiple scores--so by planning to take it multiple times, you might be doing yourself a disservice.

Moreover, I also think that (1) a possible drawback is that schools will notice two very similar or good scores and wonder why you took it twice, (2) unless something happened to adversely affect your score the first time around, you probably will not post much improvement, especially if you are already a top scorer, (3) if you post only a 1-3 point improvement, schools will probably not give you any extra points, since that's still within the score band that LSAC is predicting, and schools are probably smart enough to recognize that fluctuation, and (4) the test is still a very stressful, grueling experience that requires months of preparation and study, and that's not going to change just because you have an opportunity to take it multiple times.

It sounds like you are counting on taking it multiple times with the hope that by coindicence, pure luck or added test taking experience, your score may increase the second or third time around.  That's a small expected payoff compared to the difficulties and stress of prepping, paying the $118 fee, going through the 5 hour test , etc.