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Author Topic: With new LSAT reporting...Should I reapply?  (Read 937 times)

JohnnyVal02

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With new LSAT reporting...Should I reapply?
« on: June 16, 2006, 12:56:32 PM »
Hey all,

I'm applying for this cycle, and pretty much ready to go to a 2nd tier school, and scored a 154 and a 160 on my LSATS.  Now...With the new reporting, should I just reapply next year, with a 160 being much better than a 157, or should i just go to the 2nd tier school?  I DID get in on the low side of their range, but I did go to a good undergrad.

Thoughts would be very helpful


henj

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Re: With new LSAT reporting...Should I reapply?
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2006, 08:42:08 PM »
my girlfriend is thinking about law school, and she is studying like mad for the lsat right now. she was aiming for the upper-150s, but now that the policy's changed, lots of people (like her) are going to take the test multiple times and hope for a miracle score. i'm thinkin that'll raise the average lsat score, making for a tougher test in future years.

moral of the story ... i'd be happy w/ what you have.
Attending the U of MN this fall!



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prolesurge

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Re: With new LSAT reporting...Should I reapply?
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2006, 09:31:39 PM »
my girlfriend is thinking about law school, and she is studying like mad for the lsat right now. she was aiming for the upper-150s, but now that the policy's changed, lots of people (like her) are going to take the test multiple times and hope for a miracle score. i'm thinkin that'll raise the average lsat score, making for a tougher test in future years.

moral of the story ... i'd be happy w/ what you have.

That's assuming that multiple tests actually lead to higher score. Taking three preptests don't immediately result in a higher score-and taking three LSATs won't either.

The average test taker only improves two points on a retake.

HK

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Re: With new LSAT reporting...Should I reapply?
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2006, 05:57:50 AM »
my girlfriend is thinking about law school, and she is studying like mad for the lsat right now. she was aiming for the upper-150s, but now that the policy's changed, lots of people (like her) are going to take the test multiple times and hope for a miracle score. i'm thinkin that'll raise the average lsat score, making for a tougher test in future years.

moral of the story ... i'd be happy w/ what you have.

That's assuming that multiple tests actually lead to higher score. Taking three preptests don't immediately result in a higher score-and taking three LSATs won't either.

The average test taker only improves two points on a retake.

I wonder if this may change. Basically a test-taker can now be more relaxed and at ease on any retake because it is without risk, and they can do it twice.

prolesurge

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Re: With new LSAT reporting...Should I reapply?
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2006, 12:42:46 PM »
my girlfriend is thinking about law school, and she is studying like mad for the lsat right now. she was aiming for the upper-150s, but now that the policy's changed, lots of people (like her) are going to take the test multiple times and hope for a miracle score. i'm thinkin that'll raise the average lsat score, making for a tougher test in future years.

moral of the story ... i'd be happy w/ what you have.

That's assuming that multiple tests actually lead to higher score. Taking three preptests don't immediately result in a higher score-and taking three LSATs won't either.

The average test taker only improves two points on a retake.

I wonder if this may change. Basically a test-taker can now be more relaxed and at ease on any retake because it is without risk, and they can do it twice.

But what about the possibility of an increase of unprepared test takers? If people know that one bad score won't doom their chance at a t14 for eternity, they may elect to take it once, then take a prepclass, and then take it again.

Despite the fact that I'm sure there are people who have been totally disabled by stress, stress can only hurt your score so much. A person who has been scoring a 160 on preptests won't suddenly score a 165 because of the new rule.