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Author Topic: Lead a Native in the right path.  (Read 1128 times)

Crawford

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Lead a Native in the right path.
« on: June 10, 2006, 03:39:09 PM »
I am a Full Native American and registered with the Choctaw Tribe, and I was wondering if all the "hype" on the Ivy league schools recruiting Natives is true.
I'm your typical Native raised on the reservation. (This is stereotypical) I didnt' finish school , I dropped out to support my baby and My family is not wealthy.
I have gone back a few years later and got my GED. Right after that, I enlisted in the military. After the training, I went to a community college, which I'm currently in. I served a year in Iraq and now trying to pursue my dream of being a Lawyer.
My question is... Is there any chance for me in an Ivy League School?
Do I need to take any ACT's, SAT's or anything like that? What do I need to do as far as preparing for Law School? Im real determined.

Reach

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Re: Lead a Native in the right path.
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2006, 05:24:22 PM »
If you're serious, you've gotta take your LSAT.  Register for the October test (administereted September 30th this year) and start studying for it two or three months in advance.  I only had a month to study before I take mine on June 12th, and that's really hurt me. 

If you use the LSAC site to view ABA school data, you can get figures on minorities at particular schools.  Most law schools have single digit numbers for Natives and, as such, being one can't hurt you.  Growing up on a rez means you've been through and seen (and eaten :D) things that most other people couldn't imagine and that makes for a great diversity and personal statement.  Just be sure to keep it upbeat and not to focus on the things your situation deprived you of, but rather what it provided to you and how the wealth of your experience can enrich the lives of your law school colleagues. 

Two things you have to do:  get a bachelor's degree and take the LSAT.  If you've got a few years to go before you get your degree, consider pounding on the books to maintain a really high GPA before diving into LSAT.  Being an URM, having had an unusual upbringing, and a high GPA can combine to do wonders.  Play to your strengths and show your dedication in your grades.  If you do that I think you've got a shot at going as high as is possible.

Crawford

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Re: Lead a Native in the right path.
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2006, 11:37:51 PM »
Thanks, i really do appreciate this. Down here in mississippi, we dont get many positive influence. Anyway, thank you for your response.

slacker

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Re: Lead a Native in the right path.
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2006, 04:59:16 AM »
You might also search for lawyers in the area who can help; serve as mentors. (Wouldn't hurt if they were ivy-league grads themselves.) Find the people who will give you support, and ignore the nay-sayers.

Best of luck to you!

randylf

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Re: Lead a Native in the right path.
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2006, 12:40:44 AM »
as a native american who attended an ivy league for undergrad i would definately say that ivies are looking for qualified native applicants.  however the standards for admissions into an ivy league institution doesn't change much for the ivies simply because a person is native american.  and even upon acceptance to an ivy league institution the work load can be quite overwhelming for someone who did not have a rigorous educational background, as in those school systems on reservations and other areas.  I would encourage you to keep attending school and if you are still interested in attending an ivy you can contact their native american program representative. 

Reach

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Re: Lead a Native in the right path.
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2006, 10:46:59 AM »
as a native american who attended an ivy league for undergrad i would definately say that ivies are looking for qualified native applicants.  however the standards for admissions into an ivy league institution doesn't change much for the ivies simply because a person is native american.  and even upon acceptance to an ivy league institution the work load can be quite overwhelming for someone who did not have a rigorous educational background, as in those school systems on reservations and other areas.  I would encourage you to keep attending school and if you are still interested in attending an ivy you can contact their native american program representative. 

Congrats on your accomplishments.  One thing I really like about Wisconsin (aside from the Greek restaurants on State St.) is the fairly large Native American population.  My brother was on a drum in Madison, and his Menominee roomate went to the law school.  He had nothing but good things to say about it and I really got a sense of community from my time visiting.  Of course Wisconsin isn't an ivy or anything, but it's nice to know that there are good institutions with cohesive Native groups.