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Author Topic: national sales tax  (Read 4320 times)

nathanielmark

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Re: national sales tax
« Reply #30 on: August 13, 2004, 12:28:41 PM »
bush is either speaking out of ignorance of the tax itself, political ignorance, or full knowledge with the belief most americans are too ignorant to understand the implications of a regressive tax structure.

anyway you take it it does not reflect well on him.

Who said Bush didn't understand the regressive nature of the sales tax?

He may have spoken where his party/insiders didn't want him to, but that is no sign of a lack of understanding of the tax system.

Bisquick

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Re: national sales tax
« Reply #31 on: August 13, 2004, 01:19:25 PM »
G-E-H  Why do you keep screaming regressive tax?  Do you think anyone would let that pass without buffering the system for lower incomes?
3.8/155

nathanielmark

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Re: national sales tax
« Reply #32 on: August 13, 2004, 01:22:07 PM »
think about the complexities involved to create these so-called "buffers"... by the time anything was established that way it would be as messy (if not more so) then the current system... my impression was bush was speaking of a pure national sales tax, free of "buffers" or what i would call loop holes.



G-E-H  Why do you keep screaming regressive tax?  Do you think anyone would let that pass without buffering the system for lower incomes?

jgruber

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Re: national sales tax
« Reply #33 on: August 13, 2004, 01:25:03 PM »
G-E-H  Why do you keep screaming regressive tax?  Do you think anyone would let that pass without buffering the system for lower incomes?

I think they would.  Witness Tennessee's sales tax.  I pay 9 percent on all purchases except eye glasses and prescription drugs.

nathanielmark

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Re: national sales tax
« Reply #34 on: August 13, 2004, 01:33:19 PM »
but in order to establish a national sales tax to replace income tax, they would have to keep food taxed at certain levels, it would not be an open free-for-all.. now some foods are luxuries, others necessities, etc... how do you work this kind of thing out?


I'd think they would cut it on food, Indiana at least has none on food.

jgruber

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Re: national sales tax
« Reply #35 on: August 13, 2004, 01:39:02 PM »
I think that classification is pretty broad in Indiana.  I've never read the code or figured out exactly what on my bill was or was not taxed.  Most of it (even relatively higher end food like premium Angus Steaks) is not taxed.

many states that do not tax food will tax luxury foods and prepared (restaurant) food

nathanielmark

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Re: national sales tax
« Reply #36 on: August 13, 2004, 01:39:44 PM »
greeneqs is soundly defeated, retreats from thread with tale between his legs.


I think that classification is pretty broad in Indiana.  I've never read the code or figured out exactly what on my bill was or was not taxed.  Most of it (even relatively higher end food like premium Angus Steaks) is not taxed.

many states that do not tax food will tax luxury foods and prepared (restaurant) food

Bisquick

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Re: national sales tax
« Reply #37 on: August 13, 2004, 01:49:29 PM »
defeated?  You have very valid points. 

Clothing could be harder to do.  I would really hope that a lavish fur coat would be taxed, but don't want Little Timmy's snowsuit to be taxed.
3.8/155

lawyerboy

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Re: national sales tax
« Reply #38 on: August 13, 2004, 01:50:51 PM »
In Pennsylvania, they are talking about lowering the sales tax from 6 percent to 4 percent but widening it to cover food and other current exemptions. This plan would also eliminate ALL property and other nuisance taxes. It's an interesting proposal...

jgruber

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Re: national sales tax
« Reply #39 on: August 13, 2004, 01:51:38 PM »
If I remember correctly, New Jersey had just such a situation.

clothing below certain dollar amounts are not taxed.



And I think Mass. is like that.


defeated?  You have very valid points. 

Indiana does tax at restaurants.

Clothing could be harder to do.  I would really hope that a lavish fur coat would be taxed, but don't want Little Timmy's snowsuit to be taxed.