Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Where is the outrage over these numbers?  (Read 9818 times)

nyugrad06

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 251
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Where is the outrage over these numbers?
« Reply #30 on: January 08, 2007, 08:43:58 AM »
elites?  over 20% of people in our country have attended college.  Over 60% of high school students now go onto college.  This is one massive elite class!

praise america, i say.

flyaway

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2352
    • View Profile
Re: Where is the outrage over these numbers?
« Reply #31 on: January 08, 2007, 09:03:10 AM »
But 20% of our country having attended college doesn't mean that the children of those people are trying to use legacy status to get into a particular college.  I would really be curious to know what percentage of college admits are legacies.
Michigan Law Class of 2010

veritas_fl

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 133
    • View Profile
Re: Where is the outrage over these numbers?
« Reply #32 on: January 08, 2007, 09:17:03 AM »
Legacies are most prevalent at the undergraduate level.

At the MBA / JD level, it does not matter if you are a legacy. Unless, of course, your parents are 6 - 7 figure financial donaters.

queencruella

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4213
    • View Profile
Re: Where is the outrage over these numbers?
« Reply #33 on: January 08, 2007, 09:32:30 AM »
Legacies are most prevalent at the undergraduate level.

At the MBA / JD level, it does not matter if you are a legacy. Unless, of course, your parents are 6 - 7 figure financial donaters.

While that might be true, having the opportunity to go to a prestigious school for undergrad can have a huge impact on one's future and ability to go to grad school.

veritas_fl

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 133
    • View Profile
Re: Where is the outrage over these numbers?
« Reply #34 on: January 08, 2007, 09:36:49 AM »
While that might be true, having the opportunity to go to a prestigious school for undergrad can have a huge impact on one's future and ability to go to grad school.

The impact is negligible and attending "a prestigious school for undergrad" does not mean you are going to be accepted into a graduate school or are going to be successful.

queencruella

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4213
    • View Profile
Re: Where is the outrage over these numbers?
« Reply #35 on: January 08, 2007, 10:02:43 AM »
While that might be true, having the opportunity to go to a prestigious school for undergrad can have a huge impact on one's future and ability to go to grad school.

The impact is negligible and attending "a prestigious school for undergrad" does not mean you are going to be accepting into a graduate school or are going to be successful.

I tend to disagree. Prestigious private institutions have much better support systems and networks in place to help advise and support students through the grad school application process. I have a close friend who is an advisor at a top public school and says that there's nothing of the sort at her school, and from what I've seen at other public universities it isn't all that much better there.

Special Agent Dana Scully

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8991
  • aka MCB
    • View Profile
Re: Where is the outrage over these numbers?
« Reply #36 on: January 08, 2007, 10:13:17 AM »
While that might be true, having the opportunity to go to a prestigious school for undergrad can have a huge impact on one's future and ability to go to grad school.

The impact is negligible and attending "a prestigious school for undergrad" does not mean you are going to be accepting into a graduate school or are going to be successful.

I tend to disagree. Prestigious private institutions have much better support systems and networks in place to help advise and support students through the grad school application process. I have a close friend who is an advisor at a top public school and says that there's nothing of the sort at her school, and from what I've seen at other public universities it isn't all that much better there.

I agree with you on the bolded queencruella.  I posted on a thread that I got guidance from my school's pre-law dean and a poster was incredulous at the fact that there was a dean specifically for pre-law.
Columbia 3L

veritas_fl

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 133
    • View Profile
Re: Where is the outrage over these numbers?
« Reply #37 on: January 08, 2007, 10:22:09 AM »
I tend to disagree.

We are all entitled to our own views :P

Prestigious private institutions have much better support systems and networks in place to help advise and support students through the grad school application process.

The name of your school means crap about a month after you start a job and I have yet to be asked where I go to school.

I have a close friend who is an advisor at a top public school and says that there's nothing of the sort at her school, and from what I've seen at other public universities it isn't all that much better there.

That's fine and it really does not matter. People have to have the drive and the want to take care of things themselves.

queencruella

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4213
    • View Profile
Re: Where is the outrage over these numbers?
« Reply #38 on: January 08, 2007, 10:37:03 AM »
I tend to disagree.

We are all entitled to our own views :P

Prestigious private institutions have much better support systems and networks in place to help advise and support students through the grad school application process.

The name of your school means crap about a month after you start a job and I have yet to be asked where I go to school.

I have a close friend who is an advisor at a top public school and says that there's nothing of the sort at her school, and from what I've seen at other public universities it isn't all that much better there.

That's fine and it really does not matter. People have to have the drive and the want to take care of things themselves.

Look, I'm not straight out of undergrad and I realize that in a lot of circumstances school name doesn't really matter much, but when you're talking about finding the first job or getting into grad school, that networking/support you get within your undergrad institution can go a long way. I know you were a non-trad undergrad, but many trad undergrads need the additional support because they aren't really familiar with the real world yet.

The name of your school does mean a lot if you plan on being a professor or getting a job with a Ph.D.

Red Bull Imperator

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 840
  • Redbull sceptrum orbis terrarum
    • View Profile
Re: Where is the outrage over these numbers?
« Reply #39 on: January 08, 2007, 10:39:49 AM »
I am absolutely outraged. Utterly and completely outraged.
LSAC Report:      $12
LSAT:             $120
Getting accepted: Priceless