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Author Topic: Best Firms for Minorities?  (Read 4614 times)

crazy8

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Re: Best Firms for Minorities?
« Reply #50 on: May 22, 2006, 05:47:26 PM »
OSA, I'm already there -- the Bristow is my dream.  But that'll require me to do very well; the Bristow is about as competitive as a prestigious circuit clerkship or even a SCOTUS clerkship, from what I hear.


How difficult is it to break into appellate litigation (I know I've asked this a million times).  If I end up as an editor on a secondary journal (civil rights-civil liberties, journal of law and public policy) and land a circuit clerkship in an okay circuit (4th, let's say) with a non-feeder judge.  Am I gonna have difficulty breaking into appellate work?  Would I have to do a bunch of litigation work at a biglaw firm before I could get to a small PI firm or AUSA/DOJ work?

From what I've heard Bristow isn't quite as competitive as the Supremes--probably the same as a middle/lower feeder. 

Appellate litigation is hella hard to break into.  Almost everybody and their mom think they want to do appellate.  To be safe, I think you would need a bit more.   If you are really interested in this it might be helpful for you to create a niche for yourself. I would look heavily at DOJ Honors Program as well as the Department of Labor's Honor Program http://www.dol.gov/sol/honorsprogram.htm   Because of the way Big law firms are structured it will be hard to move from general litigation to appellate litigation unless you work at Williams & Connolly or another litigation-focused firm.  And even if you wind up getting hired at Gibson/Kirkland/insert other big appellate practice here i.e. Jenner, Sidley etc, there is a pecking order with who will get the best work i.e. the elect and perhaps a few others then the rest of the great unwashed will be scrambling for appellate scraps.




Office of Personnel Management
Presidential Management Fellows Program
The Office of Personal Management recruits 3Ls and LLMs for a two-year program placing them in public policy and management positions within federal government agencies and departments. Upon completion of the internship, fellows are eligible for a permanent position.


Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Honors Program
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Attorney Honor Program recruits and hires 3Ls, LLMs, and Judicial Law Clerks for permanent agency positions. In 2004 the EEOC hired six honor attorneys.


Federal Communications Commission
Honors Program
The Federal Communications Commission seeks 3Ls, Judicial Law Clerks and attorneys with less than 2 years of experience for its two-year Attorney Honors Program. At the end of the two year program participants may be considered for continued employment.


Central Intelligence Agency
Honors Program
The CIA hires 3Ls and Judicial Law Clerks who would like to gain exposure to national security law. At the end of the three-year program a person may obtain a permanent position based on performance, availability of positions and budget constraints. The office has approximately 100 attorneys whose work includes legal issues relating to civil and criminal litigation, foreign intelligence and counterintelligence activities, counterterrorism, counter narcotics, nonproliferation and arms control, personnel and security matters, contracting, finance and budget matters, tax, immigration, international financial transactions, corporate law, copyright, intellectual property, foreign and international law and legislation.


US Department of Justice
Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management
Honors Program
The Attorney Generalís Honors Program is the recruiting program of the Department of Justice and is the only way the Department hires graduating law students. There is an estimated 120-140 attorneys that will be hired in nine of the DOJ organizations with most positions being in Washington D.C. The Honors Program appointments are for permanent attorney positions with the exception of the Executive Office for Immigration Review.


Department of Labor
The Office of the Solicitor
Honors Program
The Office of the Solicitor hires ten 3Ls, LLMs, and Judicial Law Clerks as Honors Attorneys. Attorneys spend the first two years in the Special Appellate and Supreme Court Litigation Division, which prepares Supreme Court briefs and handles selected Court of Appeals litigation on issues of unusual importance or difficulty. After two years, attorneys are assigned to a specific division that best accommodates the individualís preferences.


Internal Revenue Service
Chief Counsel Honors Program
The IRS Chief Counsel Honors Program is designed for 3Ls to begin their careers as law clerks at the Office of Chief Counsel before becoming members of the bar. This position gives training experience in tax law. Approximately 40 positions are available each year.

National Labor Relations Board
Attorney Honor Program
This one year program in one of the Agencyís headquarters offices or one of its 33 field offices is for 3Ls, LLMs, and Judicial Law Clerks. Honors attorneys are hired permanently, but must pass the Bar within 14 months in any state, territory, or district.

United States Postal Service
Honor Attorney Program
This is a two-year program for 3Ls and law school graduates with up to two years of experience and the primary means by which the US Postal Service hires permanent employees. The number of openings varies from year to year, with six attorneys being hired in 2004. The law department is general counsel to a $65 billion agency with 800,000 employees. Honors attorneys that work at Headquarters spend the first two years rotating through at least two divisions, as well as the Mid-Atlantic Office, to learn about the Department. The starting salary for an honor attorney is $62,491.


Environmental Protection Agency
Honors Attorney Fellowship
The New England and Philadelphia regions are looking for one to two 3Ls or Judicial Law Clerks each for their two year fellowships. Each region receives 100 to 200 applications each year. The honors attorneys work with EPA attorneys on policy, regulatory and enforcement matters arising under federal statutes such as the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Superfund, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and other federal statutes.

Department of Interior
Solicitorís Honors Program
This program is the Departmentís primary method of recruiting new lawyers. Eight 3Ls, graduating LLMs, or Judicial Law Clerks were hired in 2004. Participants rotate in the Division of General Law, Indian Affairs, Land and Water Resources, Mineral Resources, and Parks and Wildlife. At the end of the year, with satisfactory completion, bar admissions, and the Departmentís appropriations, each attorney is placed in a division, region, or field office based on interest and skill.


United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Honor Law Graduate Program
The program selects four to six 3Ls, LLMs, or Judicial Clerks to participate in the two-year program that leads to permanent hire. Participants rotate in each division and continue their training by taking courses in Washington D.C. and elsewhere, in order to strengthen their skills in trial and appellate practice, environmental, procurement and personnel law, and the Freedom of Information Act.


Securities and Exchange Commission
Advanced Commitment Program
The SEC hires 25-50 3Ls, LLMs, and Judicial Law Clerks for the Advanced Commitment Program in the Washington D.C., New York, and Chicago offices. The students enter as law clerks, pass the bar within 14 months, and are promoted after 12 months. The salary for 2004 was $67,000. The SEC does offer Loan Repayment Plan up to $10,000 per calendar year.


Federal Bureau of Investigation
Honors Internship Program
This ten-week summer program offers 1Ls, 2Ls, and 3Ls going into LLM programs an inside view of FBI operations in Washington, D.C. Law students are typically placed in the Office of General Counsel, Criminal Division, and National Security Division. In 2004 approximately 90 students were hired. The Office of General Counsel may offer permanent positions or honors interns may be recruited as FBI agents but the Office does not guarantee it.


Federal Election Commission
Law Clerk Honors Program
The Federal Election Commission hires five to six 3Ls and then clerks will be given 14 months to pass the bar. Once this is completed the position is converted into a permanent attorney position.


U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development
Legal Honors Intern Program
This program hires six to twelve 3Ls, LLMs, or Judicial Law Clerks.


mivida where did you get this info?

2Lacoste

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Re: Best Firms for Minorities?
« Reply #51 on: May 22, 2006, 06:59:50 PM »
OSA, I'm already there -- the Bristow is my dream.  But that'll require me to do very well; the Bristow is about as competitive as a prestigious circuit clerkship or even a SCOTUS clerkship, from what I hear.


How difficult is it to break into appellate litigation (I know I've asked this a million times).  If I end up as an editor on a secondary journal (civil rights-civil liberties, journal of law and public policy) and land a circuit clerkship in an okay circuit (4th, let's say) with a non-feeder judge.  Am I gonna have difficulty breaking into appellate work?  Would I have to do a bunch of litigation work at a biglaw firm before I could get to a small PI firm or AUSA/DOJ work?

From what I've heard Bristow isn't quite as competitive as the Supremes--probably the same as a middle/lower feeder. 

Appellate litigation is hella hard to break into.  Almost everybody and their mom think they want to do appellate.  To be safe, I think you would need a bit more.   If you are really interested in this it might be helpful for you to create a niche for yourself. I would look heavily at DOJ Honors Program as well as the Department of Labor's Honor Program http://www.dol.gov/sol/honorsprogram.htm   Because of the way Big law firms are structured it will be hard to move from general litigation to appellate litigation unless you work at Williams & Connolly or another litigation-focused firm.  And even if you wind up getting hired at Gibson/Kirkland/insert other big appellate practice here i.e. Jenner, Sidley etc, there is a pecking order with who will get the best work i.e. the elect and perhaps a few others then the rest of the great unwashed will be scrambling for appellate scraps.




Office of Personnel Management
Presidential Management Fellows Program
The Office of Personal Management recruits 3Ls and LLMs for a two-year program placing them in public policy and management positions within federal government agencies and departments. Upon completion of the internship, fellows are eligible for a permanent position.


Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Honors Program
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Attorney Honor Program recruits and hires 3Ls, LLMs, and Judicial Law Clerks for permanent agency positions. In 2004 the EEOC hired six honor attorneys.


Federal Communications Commission
Honors Program
The Federal Communications Commission seeks 3Ls, Judicial Law Clerks and attorneys with less than 2 years of experience for its two-year Attorney Honors Program. At the end of the two year program participants may be considered for continued employment.


Central Intelligence Agency
Honors Program
The CIA hires 3Ls and Judicial Law Clerks who would like to gain exposure to national security law. At the end of the three-year program a person may obtain a permanent position based on performance, availability of positions and budget constraints. The office has approximately 100 attorneys whose work includes legal issues relating to civil and criminal litigation, foreign intelligence and counterintelligence activities, counterterrorism, counter narcotics, nonproliferation and arms control, personnel and security matters, contracting, finance and budget matters, tax, immigration, international financial transactions, corporate law, copyright, intellectual property, foreign and international law and legislation.


US Department of Justice
Office of Attorney Recruitment and Management
Honors Program
The Attorney Generalís Honors Program is the recruiting program of the Department of Justice and is the only way the Department hires graduating law students. There is an estimated 120-140 attorneys that will be hired in nine of the DOJ organizations with most positions being in Washington D.C. The Honors Program appointments are for permanent attorney positions with the exception of the Executive Office for Immigration Review.


Department of Labor
The Office of the Solicitor
Honors Program
The Office of the Solicitor hires ten 3Ls, LLMs, and Judicial Law Clerks as Honors Attorneys. Attorneys spend the first two years in the Special Appellate and Supreme Court Litigation Division, which prepares Supreme Court briefs and handles selected Court of Appeals litigation on issues of unusual importance or difficulty. After two years, attorneys are assigned to a specific division that best accommodates the individualís preferences.


Internal Revenue Service
Chief Counsel Honors Program
The IRS Chief Counsel Honors Program is designed for 3Ls to begin their careers as law clerks at the Office of Chief Counsel before becoming members of the bar. This position gives training experience in tax law. Approximately 40 positions are available each year.

National Labor Relations Board
Attorney Honor Program
This one year program in one of the Agencyís headquarters offices or one of its 33 field offices is for 3Ls, LLMs, and Judicial Law Clerks. Honors attorneys are hired permanently, but must pass the Bar within 14 months in any state, territory, or district.

United States Postal Service
Honor Attorney Program
This is a two-year program for 3Ls and law school graduates with up to two years of experience and the primary means by which the US Postal Service hires permanent employees. The number of openings varies from year to year, with six attorneys being hired in 2004. The law department is general counsel to a $65 billion agency with 800,000 employees. Honors attorneys that work at Headquarters spend the first two years rotating through at least two divisions, as well as the Mid-Atlantic Office, to learn about the Department. The starting salary for an honor attorney is $62,491.


Environmental Protection Agency
Honors Attorney Fellowship
The New England and Philadelphia regions are looking for one to two 3Ls or Judicial Law Clerks each for their two year fellowships. Each region receives 100 to 200 applications each year. The honors attorneys work with EPA attorneys on policy, regulatory and enforcement matters arising under federal statutes such as the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Superfund, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and other federal statutes.

Department of Interior
Solicitorís Honors Program
This program is the Departmentís primary method of recruiting new lawyers. Eight 3Ls, graduating LLMs, or Judicial Law Clerks were hired in 2004. Participants rotate in the Division of General Law, Indian Affairs, Land and Water Resources, Mineral Resources, and Parks and Wildlife. At the end of the year, with satisfactory completion, bar admissions, and the Departmentís appropriations, each attorney is placed in a division, region, or field office based on interest and skill.


United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Honor Law Graduate Program
The program selects four to six 3Ls, LLMs, or Judicial Clerks to participate in the two-year program that leads to permanent hire. Participants rotate in each division and continue their training by taking courses in Washington D.C. and elsewhere, in order to strengthen their skills in trial and appellate practice, environmental, procurement and personnel law, and the Freedom of Information Act.


Securities and Exchange Commission
Advanced Commitment Program
The SEC hires 25-50 3Ls, LLMs, and Judicial Law Clerks for the Advanced Commitment Program in the Washington D.C., New York, and Chicago offices. The students enter as law clerks, pass the bar within 14 months, and are promoted after 12 months. The salary for 2004 was $67,000. The SEC does offer Loan Repayment Plan up to $10,000 per calendar year.


Federal Bureau of Investigation
Honors Internship Program
This ten-week summer program offers 1Ls, 2Ls, and 3Ls going into LLM programs an inside view of FBI operations in Washington, D.C. Law students are typically placed in the Office of General Counsel, Criminal Division, and National Security Division. In 2004 approximately 90 students were hired. The Office of General Counsel may offer permanent positions or honors interns may be recruited as FBI agents but the Office does not guarantee it.


Federal Election Commission
Law Clerk Honors Program
The Federal Election Commission hires five to six 3Ls and then clerks will be given 14 months to pass the bar. Once this is completed the position is converted into a permanent attorney position.


U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development
Legal Honors Intern Program
This program hires six to twelve 3Ls, LLMs, or Judicial Law Clerks.



ON POINT.  Good looking out, someone should sticky this on the front page of BLSD.  Most of those opps are for graduates, but some are summer programs as well.
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2Lacoste

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Re: Best Firms for Minorities?
« Reply #52 on: May 22, 2006, 08:12:15 PM »
Gimme that CIA job, that *&^% sounds hot!
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Re: Best Firms for Minorities?
« Reply #53 on: May 22, 2006, 08:27:06 PM »
I know a bunch of the rankings people have this type of list (AmLaw, Vault) but I'm wondering from within our group -- what exactly makes a firm "minority-friendly"?  To what degree is that appealing, or taken into consideration (for those of you with firm jobs this summer, or planning on one in the near future)?

I'm thinking I might do a firm job 1L if I'm sure I can get a nice DOJ/AUSA position for my 2L.  Any idea of who is generally known to be the best firm for minorities?

is this a trick question?
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Re: Best Firms for Minorities?
« Reply #54 on: May 22, 2006, 09:43:35 PM »
Quote
United States Postal Service
Honor Attorney Program
This is a two-year program for 3Ls and law school graduates with up to two years of experience and the primary means by which the US Postal Service hires permanent employees. The number of openings varies from year to year, with six attorneys being hired in 2004. The law department is general counsel to a $65 billion agency with 800,000 employees. Honors attorneys that work at Headquarters spend the first two years rotating through at least two divisions, as well as the Mid-Atlantic Office, to learn about the Department. The starting salary for an honor attorney is $62,491.

Okay I just gotta say, you know there are some brothas and sistas working as counsel to the PO. You just know there ain't many white people applying for that job.
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dividebyzero

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Re: Best Firms for Minorities?
« Reply #55 on: May 22, 2006, 09:54:20 PM »
Gimme that CIA job, that *&^% sounds hot!

That's where I'm thinking of heading...either there or DIA (Defense Intelligence Agency, the military counterpart. They, and the NSA, pay more, you should check those out as well) on the intel community side, or State Department if somehow I'm lucky enough for it to happen. On the one hand, the agencies are near desperate for minorities on all levels, especially for legal reps, the work can vary considerably.

BTW, for the most part, it's not likely to be anything "cool" like counterterrorism or anything like that, mainly paper-shuffling, making sure contracts are legit, inprocessing/properly debriefing personnel, a lot of functions similar to what you'd find in the civilian world.

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mivida2k

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Re: Best Firms for Minorities?
« Reply #56 on: May 22, 2006, 10:47:44 PM »
MDLaw  I am working on my thesis (and yes it will be published and hopefully get some awards) and I researched those programs.  More African-Americans need to apply to those programs.

In two years who knows what Gonzalez will have done to the DOJ program.   >:( :-X


Thanks Head Mistress for those links.  Helpful for my literature review aka pain in the a**.
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Re: Best Firms for Minorities?
« Reply #57 on: May 24, 2006, 06:19:20 AM »
Wonderful info in this thread

crazy8

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Re: Best Firms for Minorities?
« Reply #58 on: May 24, 2006, 09:48:13 AM »
MDLaw  I am working on my thesis (and yes it will be published and hopefully get some awards) and I researched those programs.  More African-Americans need to apply to those programs.

In two years who knows that Gonzalez will have done to the DOJ program.   >:( :-X


Thanks Head Mistress for those links.  Helpful for my literature review aka pain in the a**.

That's great!  I would love to read that thesis once it's done (what is your topic?)

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Re: Best Firms for Minorities?
« Reply #59 on: May 24, 2006, 02:17:28 PM »
I've heard great things about McKenzie and Baker