Law School Discussion

"You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."

Pythagoras

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Re: "You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."
« Reply #20 on: May 05, 2006, 12:48:22 PM »
I told a few people I'm close with at work as my excitemnt is palpable at present.  Of course, one of them decided that the next thing she needed to do was send a 20 person meeting request over our company Outlook account inviting them to a dinner to celebrate my "law school decision.  I could've commited bloody murder.  I'm pretty sure everyone in the building now knows. 

Oh well, what's that they say about hell and good intentions?  :-[

uh oh!

I have the worst time hiding my excitement.  The past few days I've regularly been leaving my office with my cell phone to talk to friends/family.  I'm pretty sure my coworkers think I'm having some kind of life crisis.

Headed to Penn?

Most likely

Excellent!  I can see why you're so excited.  :)

fuwaf

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Re: "You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."
« Reply #21 on: May 05, 2006, 07:07:30 PM »
I told my supervisor THIS TIME LAST YEAR that I was thinking about applying... then I told her I was applying... then I asked her to write a rec... and then, when I told her I couldn't get them a definite answer as to if/when I would be leaving, they decided to go ahead and post my job anyway.  Now I feel like I'm getting pushed out the door, and I anticipate being treated poorly for the rest of the summer, considering the BS work that's been thrown my way recently.  So there are definitely downsides to telling them early...

Re: "You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."
« Reply #22 on: May 06, 2006, 08:03:23 AM »
I'm not 1-L (applying in fall) but I have (will have) a similar situation.  I love my job and am actually still in a training program.  It's an 18 month training program that ends at the end of the year, then i'll move into a 'permanent' position.  I'm wondering whether I should tell them early (really don't want to).  What did those of you who didn't tell them do about recommendations? How did you ask for recs for those that did tell?

I anticipate starting in my current dept (trust dept) full time at the end of the year (currently here as a trainee).  Should I give them some sort of heads up so that they don't start assigning accounts that will be ditched 9 months later?  It's not good for business continuity and problem doesn't give the client the best impression.

In your case, I'd say don't tell them yet, although that does mean forgoing recommendations (since you haven't been there long, they probably wouldn't carry much weight anyway).  They're not going to want to train you if they know you're going away.  It's nice to be concerned about the company's welfare, but eh, they'll get by without you.  :)

Pythagoras

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Re: "You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."
« Reply #23 on: May 06, 2006, 08:24:20 AM »
I'm not 1-L (applying in fall) but I have (will have) a similar situation.  I love my job and am actually still in a training program.  It's an 18 month training program that ends at the end of the year, then i'll move into a 'permanent' position.  I'm wondering whether I should tell them early (really don't want to).  What did those of you who didn't tell them do about recommendations? How did you ask for recs for those that did tell?

I anticipate starting in my current dept (trust dept) full time at the end of the year (currently here as a trainee).  Should I give them some sort of heads up so that they don't start assigning accounts that will be ditched 9 months later?  It's not good for business continuity and problem doesn't give the client the best impression.

In your case, I'd say don't tell them yet, although that does mean forgoing recommendations (since you haven't been there long, they probably wouldn't carry much weight anyway).  They're not going to want to train you if they know you're going away.  It's nice to be concerned about the company's welfare, but eh, they'll get by without you.  :)

How true.  The former HR person at my job who's been there for 6 years just got replaced by a 22 year old fresh out of college. 

Re: "You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."
« Reply #24 on: May 08, 2006, 10:16:53 AM »
In the same boat. Only started my full time position at the beginning of the year, and am planning to give notice any week now. It's really hard, as I'm working at a property management company, and these law students will call up, tell me they're going to UVA and need a place to stay, and I just want to start gabbing about how exciting it is to be headed to UVA... and instead I just have to transfer them to the right department  >:(


*sigh*

At least once I'm done working, I'll have time to devote towards law related things, rather than bookkeeping or teaching piano... a much needed change of pace.

orky13

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Re: "You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."
« Reply #25 on: May 09, 2006, 02:50:38 PM »
oh man am I excited about the change of pace! I can't wait to begin looking at apartments, buying a laptop, getting schoolbooks, join some law-related clubs... whoohoo...

okay now back to processing purchase orders.

Re: "You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."
« Reply #26 on: May 09, 2006, 04:10:51 PM »
I got that from my assistant at work today (I am leaving in July for school, but nobody here knows it yet). I did a not-very-convincing job of saying "no, do you have any specific concerns, blah blah blah."

I'm confused.  It's mid-May right now.  If you're leaving in July, and plan to give up to three weeks notice before you leave, then you're talking about treading water for about 6 weeks or so.  Hell, I could go undercover as a cardio-thorasic surgeon and last 6 weeks before they kick me out!  If you have a nosy colleague, you truthfully say you're "dealing with some personal issues" and let people gossip all they want.  It's 6 weeks, who cares? 

It sounds like you fraternize too much at work and have issues in maintaining boundaries.  If a direct-report of MINE had the balls to make a comment like that to my face, their stint with the company would be shorter than mine!  Of course, I would never let a relationship with a subordinate reach that kind of informal comfort level in the first place.  It blows my mind that you're worried about explaining yourself to a direct-report, and feeling intimidated by them.

Re: "You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."
« Reply #27 on: May 09, 2006, 10:07:28 PM »
I got that from my assistant at work today (I am leaving in July for school, but nobody here knows it yet). I did a not-very-convincing job of saying "no, do you have any specific concerns, blah blah blah."

I'm confused.  It's mid-May right now.  If you're leaving in July, and plan to give up to three weeks notice before you leave, then you're talking about treading water for about 6 weeks or so.  Hell, I could go undercover as a cardio-thorasic surgeon and last 6 weeks before they kick me out!  If you have a nosy colleague, you truthfully say you're "dealing with some personal issues" and let people gossip all they want.  It's 6 weeks, who cares? 

It sounds like you fraternize too much at work and have issues in maintaining boundaries.  If a direct-report of MINE had the balls to make a comment like that to my face, their stint with the company would be shorter than mine!  Of course, I would never let a relationship with a subordinate reach that kind of informal comfort level in the first place.  It blows my mind that you're worried about explaining yourself to a direct-report, and feeling intimidated by them.


Jeez, I'm glad I don't work for you!  Are you in the military?  Not all offices are this strictly hierarchal, and frankly, it makes it more fun to go to work when everyone is friendly with each other.  My second-to-last boss was one of my best friends... this actually led to me working harder, because I admired her and wanted to impress her. 

stc34

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Re: "You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."
« Reply #28 on: May 09, 2006, 10:45:13 PM »
So how important is it to stay at a job because you'd feel guilty to leave after only being there 4 months? After another year (if I defer) I will have stayed long enough to feel that I'd fulfilled my obligations.  Should I only consider myself, and my interests, or stay in the job? Keep in mind I enjoy the job, and I'll be able to save some money, and they've agreed to defer me. 

Alamo

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Re: "You seem distracted, like you've got a foot out the door."
« Reply #29 on: May 09, 2006, 10:47:16 PM »
So how important is it to stay at a job because you'd feel guilty to leave after only being there 4 months? After another year (if I defer) I will have stayed long enough to feel that I'd fulfilled my obligations.  Should I only consider myself, and my interests, or stay in the job? Keep in mind I enjoy the job, and I'll be able to save some money, and they've agreed to defer me. 

Some Catholics would disagree, but I don't think guilt is ever a good motivating factor.  Do the best you can while you're there, and don't leave them in the midst of a huge project they're counting on you for if you can avoid it.  Other than that, look out for #1.