Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: NYLS  (Read 17471 times)

bobwil50

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 260
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: NYLS
« Reply #180 on: May 08, 2006, 05:49:56 PM »
Apparently all the Columbia trolls are pouncing on NYLS, what do they have to gain from this?  If NYLS is so insignificant, why are you prestige-whores so intent on bashing it?  Perhaps you are insecure about something.  Perhaps it is the fact that outgoing and extroverted NYLS grads will be pwning all the socially inept geeks that managed to score well on some insignificant test!  Do you really have to keep reminding yourselves that you are superior?  The law schools students who aren't obsessed with the number associated with their school will lead happier, healthy lives.  And they may be just as smart as you, but chose to attend a school for a myriad of different reasons.  Someone that turns down NYLS for Columbia simply because of a number is too dense to be truly happy with his life.  

I hate to chime in now that this conversation has degenerated, but I feel I must. There are so many factors that will determine the success of a person's career it is impossible to factor them all in. Does it help to go to a better school? Yes. However, the number one factor in gaining successful employment is personal and networking skills.

Therefore, if you don't have those kinds of skills going to a better school is all the more important. If you are gregarious, outgoing and have a good social network established, then the school is almost irrelevant.

The only time a school name will come in handy is if you intend to teach. If so, the big names become valuable because so many high-scoring LSN/D applicants mistake Tier 25 degrees for excellence. In order to lure those applicants they load their faculty with big names.


Right on!  These overachievers are missing out on great opportuinities at lower-ranked schools.  For example, a SMU grad nearly got onto the Supreme Court, and she didn't go to a precious T14 school.  Everyone has his own version of success, and those of us whose version does not include where our firm falls in the V100 (or if it's in the V100 period!) will be much better off in the long run.
LSAT: 168
GPA: 3.8

yiplong

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1530
    • View Profile
Re: NYLS
« Reply #181 on: May 08, 2006, 05:51:01 PM »

Haha, I'd like to know what investment bankers and accountants you've been talking to. 

I deal daily with wall street investment bankers and big firm accountants.  Many bankers come in 2 to 3 hours before the market opens and don't go home until 7 or 8.  If there is a major deal going on, which they need to make big money, they would have to work on weekends and holidays as well. 
For an accountant, it is almost busy all year round and crazy during tax season.  Working from home on weekends seem to be the norm. 
They seem to work average 50-60 hours, and we don't hear their professions as having brutal hours.  50-60 hours is quite normal for most office work. 
 

bobwil50

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 260
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: NYLS
« Reply #182 on: May 08, 2006, 05:55:32 PM »
Apparently all the Columbia trolls are pouncing on NYLS, what do they have to gain from this?  If NYLS is so insignificant, why are you prestige-whores so intent on bashing it?  Perhaps you are insecure about something.  Perhaps it is the fact that outgoing and extroverted NYLS grads will be pwning all the socially inept geeks that managed to score well on some insignificant test!  Do you really have to keep reminding yourselves that you are superior?  The law schools students who aren't obsessed with the number associated with their school will lead happier, healthy lives.  And they may be just as smart as you, but chose to attend a school for a myriad of different reasons.  Someone that turns down NYLS for Columbia simply because of a number is too dense to be truly happy with his life. 

I hate to chime in now that this conversation has degenerated, but I feel I must. There are so many factors that will determine the success of a person's career it is impossible to factor them all in. Does it help to go to a better school? Yes. However, the number one factor in gaining successful employment is personal and networking skills.

Therefore, if you don't have those kinds of skills going to a better school is all the more important. If you are gregarious, outgoing and have a good social network established, then the school is almost irrelevant.

The only time a school name will come in handy is if you intend to teach. If so, the big names become valuable because so many high-scoring LSN/D applicants mistake Tier 25 degrees for excellence. In order to lure those applicants they load their faculty with big names.


Right on!  These overachievers are missing out on great opportuinities at lower-ranked schools.  For example, a SMU grad nearly got onto the Supreme Court, and she didn't go to a precious T14 school.  Everyone has his own version of success, and those of us whose version does not include where our firm falls in the V100 (or if it's in the V100 period!) will be much better off in the long run.

What is this nonsense?  The only person pouncing on NYLS is going to Fordham. 

Um, both you and Stevejd are going to Columbia.
LSAT: 168
GPA: 3.8

zbttoken

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 488
    • AOL Instant Messenger - hokiegrappler11
    • View Profile
    • My MySpace profile -- I'm such a consumer whore.
    • Email
Re: NYLS
« Reply #183 on: May 08, 2006, 05:56:10 PM »
My father is in the insurance business, and he works anywhere from 55-80 hours a week. 
"Stand for something or fall for anything." -- Malcolm X

"If you find a job that you love, you'll never have to work a day in your life." -- Dr. Christopher Neck (probably taken from some other source).

http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendid=42746550

bobwil50

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 260
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: NYLS
« Reply #184 on: May 08, 2006, 06:04:44 PM »
Apparently all the Columbia trolls are pouncing on NYLS, what do they have to gain from this?  If NYLS is so insignificant, why are you prestige-whores so intent on bashing it?  Perhaps you are insecure about something.  Perhaps it is the fact that outgoing and extroverted NYLS grads will be pwning all the socially inept geeks that managed to score well on some insignificant test!  Do you really have to keep reminding yourselves that you are superior?  The law schools students who aren't obsessed with the number associated with their school will lead happier, healthy lives.  And they may be just as smart as you, but chose to attend a school for a myriad of different reasons.  Someone that turns down NYLS for Columbia simply because of a number is too dense to be truly happy with his life. 

I hate to chime in now that this conversation has degenerated, but I feel I must. There are so many factors that will determine the success of a person's career it is impossible to factor them all in. Does it help to go to a better school? Yes. However, the number one factor in gaining successful employment is personal and networking skills.

Therefore, if you don't have those kinds of skills going to a better school is all the more important. If you are gregarious, outgoing and have a good social network established, then the school is almost irrelevant.

The only time a school name will come in handy is if you intend to teach. If so, the big names become valuable because so many high-scoring LSN/D applicants mistake Tier 25 degrees for excellence. In order to lure those applicants they load their faculty with big names.


Right on!  These overachievers are missing out on great opportuinities at lower-ranked schools.  For example, a SMU grad nearly got onto the Supreme Court, and she didn't go to a precious T14 school.  Everyone has his own version of success, and those of us whose version does not include where our firm falls in the V100 (or if it's in the V100 period!) will be much better off in the long run.

What is this nonsense?  The only person pouncing on NYLS is going to Fordham. 

Um, both you and Stevejd are going to Columbia.

And I "pounced" on NYLS where, exactly?

You and Steve are both being incredibly elitist.  That attitude will get you nowhere in the field of law.
LSAT: 168
GPA: 3.8

bobwil50

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 260
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: NYLS
« Reply #185 on: May 08, 2006, 06:10:38 PM »
Apparently all the Columbia trolls are pouncing on NYLS, what do they have to gain from this?  If NYLS is so insignificant, why are you prestige-whores so intent on bashing it?  Perhaps you are insecure about something.  Perhaps it is the fact that outgoing and extroverted NYLS grads will be pwning all the socially inept geeks that managed to score well on some insignificant test!  Do you really have to keep reminding yourselves that you are superior?  The law schools students who aren't obsessed with the number associated with their school will lead happier, healthy lives.  And they may be just as smart as you, but chose to attend a school for a myriad of different reasons.  Someone that turns down NYLS for Columbia simply because of a number is too dense to be truly happy with his life. 

I hate to chime in now that this conversation has degenerated, but I feel I must. There are so many factors that will determine the success of a person's career it is impossible to factor them all in. Does it help to go to a better school? Yes. However, the number one factor in gaining successful employment is personal and networking skills.

Therefore, if you don't have those kinds of skills going to a better school is all the more important. If you are gregarious, outgoing and have a good social network established, then the school is almost irrelevant.

The only time a school name will come in handy is if you intend to teach. If so, the big names become valuable because so many high-scoring LSN/D applicants mistake Tier 25 degrees for excellence. In order to lure those applicants they load their faculty with big names.


Right on!  These overachievers are missing out on great opportuinities at lower-ranked schools.  For example, a SMU grad nearly got onto the Supreme Court, and she didn't go to a precious T14 school.  Everyone has his own version of success, and those of us whose version does not include where our firm falls in the V100 (or if it's in the V100 period!) will be much better off in the long run.

What is this nonsense?  The only person pouncing on NYLS is going to Fordham. 

Um, both you and Stevejd are going to Columbia.

And I "pounced" on NYLS where, exactly?

You and Steve are both being incredibly elitist.  That attitude will get you nowhere in the field of law.

You're going to have to back up that assertion. 

Haven't you every read a John Grisham book?  The scrappy, hard-working, everyman's lawyer usually defeats the elitists.
LSAT: 168
GPA: 3.8

Patrick Fitzgerald

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 130
    • View Profile
Re: NYLS
« Reply #186 on: May 08, 2006, 06:17:06 PM »
Someone that turns down NYLS for Columbia simply because of a number is too dense to be truly happy with his life. 

I'd choose NYLS over columbia because being just blocks away from the courts will give me many more chances to network and would ultimately leave me with better career prospects.

bobwil50

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 260
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: NYLS
« Reply #187 on: May 08, 2006, 06:17:47 PM »

Okay, this has got to be a flame. 


You're quick.
LSAT: 168
GPA: 3.8

4DClaw

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 823
    • View Profile
Re: NYLS
« Reply #188 on: May 08, 2006, 06:18:17 PM »
New York Law School sounds a hell of a lot more official than Columbia.
Georgetown

bobwil50

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 260
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: NYLS
« Reply #189 on: May 08, 2006, 06:21:57 PM »
New York Law School sounds a hell of a lot more official than Columbia.

No kidding, who wants to learn the law at a school named after a third world country?
LSAT: 168
GPA: 3.8