Law School Discussion

ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants

spud1987

Re: ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants
« Reply #80 on: June 26, 2006, 03:12:16 PM »
Cool, thanks paige and skeeball.

Re: ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants
« Reply #81 on: June 26, 2006, 05:14:09 PM »
Yes you guys are awesome for sharing your hard-learned lessons. I was going to ask for my LORs in late august, but I'm gonna aim for July now b/c I want to apply in September. Thanks!

rtqw

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Re: ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants
« Reply #82 on: June 26, 2006, 06:31:04 PM »
Yes you guys are awesome for sharing your hard-learned lessons. I was going to ask for my LORs in late august, but I'm gonna aim for July now b/c I want to apply in September. Thanks!

I wanted to ask in August as well, before I read the advice here. Bad news is that I live five hours away from my school, bleh- it's probably not a good idea to ask for a LOR over email.

smiley

Re: ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants
« Reply #83 on: June 26, 2006, 06:59:17 PM »
Yes you guys are awesome for sharing your hard-learned lessons. I was going to ask for my LORs in late august, but I'm gonna aim for July now b/c I want to apply in September. Thanks!

I wanted to ask in August as well, before I read the advice here. Bad news is that I live five hours away from my school, bleh- it's probably not a good idea to ask for a LOR over email.

I think it depends on the level of familiarity you have with your potential recommenders. I did ask all 4 of my recommenders over email, but I am "friends" with them and have been in regular contact with them since I graduated (which was a while ago). If you don't know them as well or have a more formal, professor-student type relationship with them, then I can see how email might not be the best way to go.

Re: ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants
« Reply #84 on: June 26, 2006, 08:35:47 PM »
Advice hmmm....

(1). Presentation is everything. This means that in addition to submitting your applications in a timely fashion, i.e. *at least* a week prior to the deadline, your personal statement and any additional writing samples should be as close to perfect as possible. Having done reasonably well last cycle and having worked on many interview panels for work, I can tell you that it DOES matter to the committee making a decision on your file how, and when, you turn in application materials.

(2) Cast your net wide...just because you may have strong numbers doesn't guarantee you a spot anywhere! There were many people (including ppl on this board) whose stats should've qualified them for MENSA but didn't get them into the door of their dream schools. I'm not saying to not have reach schools because you should at least 2 or 3. But, you should also have anywhere from 6-9 schools where you will more than likely be admitted based off of past applicant profiles (this can be gleaned from the ABA The Officially Approved Guide to US Law Schools--available for free on LSAC.org).

(3) Don't be afraid to call offices to ask serious questions! But, you should employ discretion to discern what's serious and what's just annoying. Although I haven't heard of any schools throwing out applications because of excessive phone calls, it can't be warmly received when they've got *so* many files to pour over. So, be kind to them and yourself, by letting them spend the time with applications instead of unnecessary phone calls.(Note: the exception to this rule is when/if you've been waitlisted or put on hold. In these instances, it may be a good thing to maintain consistent contact so as to show continued interest).

(4) Save now! If you aren't the heir-apparent to an oustanding fortune, which most of us aren't, you should start saving now b/c application fees and deposits will start to stack up before too long. Even if you receive a waiver to apply, you will more than likely be required to submit a deposit (which can range anywhere from $250-$700 depending on the school).**

(5) Save even more! Redundant? Yes. But, this can't be overstated. In addition to LSAT and LSAT course fees, LDSAS registration, and application fees, you should start now figuring in the costs of visiting said schools. I'd recommend visiting the schools closer to the time when you're going to make a decision/deposit. But, it can't hurt to visit them earlier either b/c you may decide that after visiting that school...that it's not for you. And that's okay!Brochures and mail outs can't give you as visceral a feel for that school as a visit can. What once seemed like *the* school for you may not even be in consideration after the visit. This happened to me, and I would wager to a great deal of ppl on here.

(6) Talk to students currenlty enrolled at the school in which your interested (preferably students that AREN'T guides or panelists at Admitted Students Events)! I can't stress this point enough because, despite what you may see or be told on visits, these average joes and jo anns will tell you exactly what they think: the good, the bad, and (in some cases) the ugly. Although it may shatter the fantasy you've just been spining away, it will save you time and grief later on.

(7) I should've put one this after #1..but oh well. Get solid rec letters from the professors that (a) know you the best and (b) that you highly esteem. My reasoning here is two fold because in following (a) you will get killer rec and in following (b) you will confidant in the letter they write you, which is especially important since you will probably waive the right to read these letters. Also, if you have a professor that's a graduate from your particular school of choice, then have them write a targeted letter for you to that school.

(8) Don't kill the mail man/woman. Just don't! As ludicrous as this sounds, they'll be days when this will seem like a very plausible idea. Resist.

(9) Send thank you notes/cards to those who wrote letters of rec for you. It's a nice thing to do and, quite frankly, you may need them again before the cycle is over either for additional LORs or for morale boosters.

(10) Mingle with other students at Admit Day events. This is important b/c, if you decided to attend that school, you could likely be in the same section. Sound like a stretch? Okay. Maybe, it is. But, it can't hurt. I found this helpful since I've hung out with some of my future classmates twice already this summer.

Hope this helps someone!










**To my knowledge, there are only two schools that don't have deposits but rather rely upon honor codes: IU-B and some other school? Also, you should consider whether or not a school requires multiple deposits.

redemption

Re: ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants
« Reply #85 on: October 23, 2006, 04:32:20 PM »
BUMP

Zam

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Re: ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants
« Reply #86 on: January 31, 2007, 01:16:00 PM »
Everything I know about how to apply to law school I learned from this thread.

Pink

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Re: ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants
« Reply #87 on: January 31, 2007, 01:29:43 PM »
This thread should have been put on a daily bump schedule starting in September.

EDIT: Or Sticky'ed

orangie

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Re: ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants
« Reply #88 on: January 31, 2007, 01:55:14 PM »
This thread should have been put on a daily bump schedule starting in September.

EDIT: Or Sticky'ed


Yeah, I definitely agree with this.

Re: ADVICE to the next cycle of applicants
« Reply #89 on: January 31, 2007, 02:01:40 PM »
wow, i remember when i started this thread...