Law School Discussion

laptop

Typhoon Longwang

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Re: laptop
« Reply #590 on: July 16, 2006, 03:18:56 PM »
Generally it's not a good idea to disconnect the cable without stopping the drive.

You might be able to work around the issue this way:
-Open My Computer
-Right click the External Hardrive
-Select Properties
-Select the "Hardware" Tab
-Select the Drive that appears to be your External HD
-Click Properties
-Select the "Policies" Tab
-Choose the radio button for "Optimize for Quick Removal"
-Restart

Hopefully that will do it for you.  Performance will degrade somewhat because you won't be using the External HD's cache as effectively/possibly not at all.  If that doesn't work, something is using your External HD continuously, which would be why Windows cannot stop it.

cesco

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Re: laptop
« Reply #591 on: July 16, 2006, 03:23:51 PM »
i hope you don't mind if i ask an off-topic question -- only doing it in this thread because i'll be more likely to reach people who might have an answer.

i am trying to safely remove an external hard drive (iomega silver series) from my pc, but i keep getting the message that the drive 'cannot be stopped at this time,' despite the fact that all applications are closed and no backup is in progress. the iomega manual advises changing the settings on my recycle bin, but i followed those instructions and am still having the same problem.

has anyone else experienced/solved this before? would it be terrible to just unplug the hdd from the laptop (when it's not in the middle of backing things up, obviously) even when i can't 'safely remove' it?

if anyone has any advice i would be extremely grateful... pm's are welcome to avoid further disrupting the topic of this thread.

I have found www.notebookforums.com to be very helpful with one-off computer questions, or just to get information and read personal reviews of specific computers.

There is a ton of info there, and a lot of computer nerds that are very helpful and quick to answer questions.

yiplong

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Re: laptop
« Reply #592 on: July 16, 2006, 04:01:47 PM »
Quote
You would have to be an absolute moron to upgrade to VISTA on a laptop.  CNET has a well-documented effort at running at VISTA and couldn't even get over 2hrs on the machine.  It's a hog that doesn't offer any tangible benefits to XP.

This doesn't change the fact that the graphics card is often the most crappy part on any given laptop, so it would be wise to change that while you can (before you buy). 

And, as has been pointed out, Vista may not run well now, but who knows what service packs/updates will do to improve its performance.  Anyway, some people may want to dual boot, or just experiment with it. 

A dedicated graphic processor not only makes the laptop more expensive, but also significantly decreases its battery ife.  Unless you want to do serious gaming on the go, (why not do serious gaming on your desktop, laptop graphic cards are all crap anyways), do not get a dedicated video card.  It is a stupid, stupid idea. 
Windows Vista is nice, but for most law students its benefit is minimal. 

Strong

Re: laptop
« Reply #593 on: July 16, 2006, 04:11:13 PM »
Vista is in Beta and everyone is screaming about 500mb of ram it uses and all the bugs. It's a beta!


Re: laptop
« Reply #594 on: July 16, 2006, 04:15:42 PM »
I've had my current laptop for 3 years and on only two occasions have I been watching something on my laptop that the integrated graphics card was unable to handle. Most of the newer games recommend at least 128MB, so getting a discrete 64MB card really isn't going to do much for you anyway.

OingoBoingo

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Re: laptop
« Reply #595 on: July 16, 2006, 05:00:26 PM »
I've had my current laptop for 3 years and on only two occasions have I been watching something on my laptop that the integrated graphics card was unable to handle. Most of the newer games recommend at least 128MB, so getting a discrete 64MB card really isn't going to do much for you anyway.

Agreed. As long as people don't settle for anything less than the Intel 950 chipset, which has been confirmed as Vista ready, they won't miss much from a discrete video card.

I guess my own personal "come to Jesus" moment with this happened when I discovered that my Intel 900 equipped Thinkpad X41 was beefy enough to play Quicktime HD and WMV video at 1080p. I didn't even think to try it at first because my old Athlon XP desktop with a ATI 9800pro (ableit on a older MB with 266MHZ memory) absolutely could not run any type of quicktime H.264 video.

Law school apps should be a breeze (comparatively)

Oingo

OingoBoingo

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Re: laptop
« Reply #596 on: July 16, 2006, 05:55:20 PM »
Stupid Question,

At risk of (again) taking us off topic, what is the easiest way to backup pretty much everything in Microsoft Outlook? (Appointments, Contacts, Calendar, Journal). What would need to be done to restore these items?

Reason why I ask is I am not buying an external HD. Rather I am going to backup weekly onto a 1 gig SD card my Onenote and Outlook critical files and then image my HD (using IBM's software) monthly.

Any ideas?

Oingo

bass

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Re: laptop
« Reply #597 on: July 16, 2006, 06:06:41 PM »
Stupid Question,

At risk of (again) taking us off topic, what is the easiest way to backup pretty much everything in Microsoft Outlook? (Appointments, Contacts, Calendar, Journal). What would need to be done to restore these items?

Reason why I ask is I am not buying an external HD. Rather I am going to backup weekly onto a 1 gig SD card my Onenote and Outlook critical files and then image my HD (using IBM's software) monthly.

Any ideas?

Oingo

Good question.  If I knew the answer, I'd still have my contacts from before my old HD died.

The easiest for me is to back up onto my phone (Tmobile MDA).  It's super convenient--I have all my appts and contacts on me all the time.

OingoBoingo

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Re: laptop
« Reply #598 on: July 16, 2006, 06:41:18 PM »
Stupid Question,

At risk of (again) taking us off topic, what is the easiest way to backup pretty much everything in Microsoft Outlook? (Appointments, Contacts, Calendar, Journal). What would need to be done to restore these items?

Reason why I ask is I am not buying an external HD. Rather I am going to backup weekly onto a 1 gig SD card my Onenote and Outlook critical files and then image my HD (using IBM's software) monthly.

Any ideas?

Oingo

Good question.  If I knew the answer, I'd still have my contacts from before my old HD died.

The easiest for me is to back up onto my phone (Tmobile MDA).  It's super convenient--I have all my appts and contacts on me all the time.

Lets say getting a phone or PDA was not an option. Anyone? Anyone?

Oingo

Re: laptop
« Reply #599 on: July 16, 2006, 06:58:32 PM »
It's been a really long time since I used Outlook, but I think all the information you need is saved into the .PST file(s).  You can just back them up yourself, XP Pro has a backup utility that you can use, or you can download the Personal Folders Backup Utility from Microsoft here http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=8b081f3a-b7d0-4b16-b8af-5a6322f4fd01&DisplayLang=en that is specific to Outlook. hth