Law School Discussion

"most", "some", "at least one" in LR

Matthew_24_24

Re: "most", "some", "at least one" in LR
« Reply #20 on: August 10, 2004, 03:01:20 PM »
You are right.  It isn't a proper deductive argument.

Most A's are B's
Most B's are C's

By your definition,makes some A's C's.  That is wrong.  There is nothing substantive between A and C logically.

Matt

Re: "most", "some", "at least one" in LR
« Reply #21 on: August 10, 2004, 03:10:45 PM »
I agree with that statement :) .. nothing can be deduced. 
51-99 As are B.
1-99 Bs are Cs.
no deduction.

51-99 As are B.
51-99 Bs are C.
Still no deduction.

but i still stand by my statement that "most A is B, but some B is C" gives different interpretations vs "most A is B, but most B is C". 


Re: "most", "some", "at least one" in LR
« Reply #22 on: August 10, 2004, 03:11:59 PM »
You are right.  It isn't a proper deductive argument.

Most A's are B's
Most B's are C's

By your definition,makes some A's C's.  That is wrong.  There is nothing substantive between A and C logically.

Matt

Rereading the example, you're correct, I wasn't thinking right. It's a quirk of the example though, not anything ambiguous about the word "most." If the argument included the premise "A and B are equal in size" then everything I said would be true, and it would indeed be a deductive argument utilizing "most."

Louder Than Bombs

Re: "most", "some", "at least one" in LR
« Reply #23 on: August 10, 2004, 03:18:41 PM »
'Most' and 'some' are not logically equivalent. Get over it. 'Most' implies 'some', but not the other way around.

Re: "most", "some", "at least one" in LR
« Reply #24 on: August 23, 2004, 09:26:36 AM »
I remembered this being somewhat of a hot topic awhile back and I just stumbled on this example from the December 2003 test that proves, for LSAT purposes, most means 'more than half' for deductive reasoning as well.

Here it is:

25.

It is difficult to grow cacti in a humid climate.  It is difficult to raise orange trees in a cold climate.  In MOST parts of a certain country, it is either easy to grow cacti or easy to raise orange trees.

If the statements above are true, which one of the following must be false?

A) Half of the country is both humid and cold.
B) Most of the country is hot.
C) Some parts of the country are neither cold nor humid.
D) It is not possible to raise cacti in the country.
E) Most parts of the country are humid.

The answer is A, and for it to be false it requires MOST to mean more than half.....

Re: "most", "some", "at least one" in LR
« Reply #25 on: August 23, 2004, 12:22:22 PM »
"Most women are smart
Most women are healthy
Thus some women are smart and healthy.

This is not correct.  This is a deductive conclusion and does not follow from the premises.

Matt

"

i still dont see how this is not correct.   if you have more than half of women who are healthy and more than half who are smart, you must have at least one woman who overlaps both groups, thus leading to the conclusion "some women are healthy and smart".

Matthew_24_24

Re: "most", "some", "at least one" in LR
« Reply #26 on: August 23, 2004, 01:02:42 PM »
Fair enough...I was wrong about their use of "most".  Up to this point I had not seen an answer that required "most" to be used in that sense...that either would work. 

I was wrong.  Casa...that would be correct if "most" = more than half.  From what i learned from two classes that dealt with quantifier logic, most is as ambigious as some, a few, many, etc..  It appears that the makers of the LSAT have decided to give a more exact quantity to most than logicians do. 

Personally...

If you are allowed to have only ONE relative (of 100 for example) attend a wedding and can get away with the statement:

"Many of my relatives went to the wedding"  then you should be able to get away with:
"Most of my relatives went to the wedding"

Don't get me wrong...it seems intuitively obvious to me that most = more than half.  I'm not arguing against that...I just thought the LSAT writers would be a bit more consistent in their use of logical quantifiers.  It is almost a double whammy...if you arent schooled in LSAT logic words like "some, many, and a few" will trip you up...and if you have a formal logic education they throw you a loop with "most". 

Luckily, TUTiger's example was really easy...and my brain (despite all logic training) would have ruled out the other choices.  I hope they dont throw a real computation heavy one out there...that would really make me mad.

Matt