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Author Topic: dependant vs. dependent  (Read 5876 times)

swifty

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Re: dependant vs. dependent
« Reply #20 on: August 07, 2004, 05:03:10 AM »
My dictionary has no listing for dependant.  My dictionary is superior to anyone else's simply because I bought it.  Therefore, there is no such word as dependant.   ;D

Seriously, "The Oxford American Desk Dictionary and Thesaurus - 2nd edition 2001"

Now the question is who has the final say?  I don't have a Webster's and really don't care to see if I can look it up for free on websters.com or whatever they are called.

If anybody posts that MS Word says it's fine, I will hunt you down and fart in your general direction.   

Form 1040 says dependent. 
And the sign said "Long-haired freaky people need not apply" So I tucked my hair up under my hat and I went in to ask him why. He said "You look like a fine outstanding young man, I think you'll do.  So I took off my hat, I said "Imagine that. Huh! Me workin' for you!"Sign, sign, everywhere a sign..

mukhia

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Re: dependant vs. dependent
« Reply #21 on: August 07, 2004, 06:27:05 PM »
Okay then Swifty, please explain differences (if any) between inquire and enquire.  Also, insure and ensure.  I have seen these words used interchangeably all over the place and assumed the former set were just due to spelling preferences, but the latter used interchangeably does not make sense to me.  For example, I went to an architect's office and their mission statement read:  To insure the beauty and preservation of all clients' projects (or something like that).  I thought it should have been ensure.   Help - LSAT is making me lose my general thining skills.

Cheeks

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Re: dependant vs. dependent
« Reply #22 on: August 07, 2004, 06:28:22 PM »
where's lexy ...
she would definitely put her foot down on this one!

mukhia

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Re: dependant vs. dependent
« Reply #23 on: August 07, 2004, 06:35:38 PM »
Exactly - did you see how I put thining instead of thinking?  I am sloshed for sure!  LOL!  Come on Lexy - put your lit to work!  Or Swifty - whip out that dictionary and set me straight!

Candide

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Re: dependant vs. dependent
« Reply #24 on: August 07, 2004, 06:43:05 PM »
where's lexy ...
she would definately put her foot down on this one!

*definitely

And here's my vote: dependent is both adjective and noun, dependant is a variant that can only be used as a noun.

edit: mukhia - enquire can be used interchangeably with inquire (you can actually say enquiry too). Ensure and insure are synonymous too, except "insure" is stronger in my opinion.

Cheeks

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Re: dependant vs. dependent
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2004, 06:44:43 PM »
I think correcting the spelling mistakes of others may be a bad habit to get into ...

Candide

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Re: dependant vs. dependent
« Reply #26 on: August 07, 2004, 06:51:03 PM »
I think correcting the spelling mistakes of others may be a bad habit to get into ...

I only did it because this is a grammar/spelling thread.  My bad.

EnglishToLaw

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Re: dependant vs. dependent
« Reply #27 on: August 07, 2004, 07:03:34 PM »
OK, gotta respond to this. The word is "dependent." It can be both a noun and an adjective. "Dependant" is essentially a misspelling, though some dictionaries will list it as an alternative spelling. (Misused words and coinages CAN and HAVE entered the language. One example is "normalcy," a word mostly popularized by Warren Harding; that is, it was in fairly rare use in America before he uttered it in a speech in 1920.)

Enquire and inquire mean the same thing; enquire is something of a British variant. Use inquire.

As to ensure, insure, and assure, the first (ensure) basically means "to make sure," whereas "insure" means to guarantee against a loss (usually monetary). The one you don't ask about is assure, which means "to reinforce" or "to state convincingly." People often misuse that one, too.

Mukhia, I think the sign in the architect's office could have (and probably should have) read "ensure," but it's difficult to tell without the entire sentence.  ::)

lexylit

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Re: dependant vs. dependent
« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2004, 09:44:10 PM »
where's lexy ...
she would definitely put her foot down on this one!

 i didn't realize i was being summoned! i'm flattered. was trying to keep my mouth shut after i was told to "never speak again" by nyknicks, but in retrospect his comment might not have been directed at me

i second englishtolaw. he's smartypantsier than i  ;) 

Cheeks

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Re: dependant vs. dependent
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2004, 10:31:22 PM »
where's lexy ...
she would definitely put her foot down on this one!

 i didn't realize i was being summoned! i'm flattered. was trying to keep my mouth shut after i was told to "never speak again" by nyknicks, but in retrospect his comment might not have been directed at me

i second englishtolaw. he's smartypantsier than i  ;) 

yay ... "dependent" it is