Law School Discussion

"some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?

Matthew_24_24

Re: "some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2004, 12:01:41 PM »
100 cars.

all cars are brown = 100 cars are brown
no cars are brown  = 0 cars are brown
some cars are brown = 1-100 cars are brown
some cars are not brown = 1-100 are not brown
a few cars are brown = 1-100 are brown
many cars are brown = 1-100 are brown
most cars are brown = 1-100 are brown
not all cars are brown = 1-100 are not brown

Anyone who says most = 51-100 is wrong.  Most is an existential quantifier in logic, nothing more...don't take the lay meaning of it.

Matthew

nathanielmark

Re: "some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2004, 12:02:49 PM »
i agree, with most = 51-100.  in fact, there was a question in a recent LSAT test that said "most but not all", which proves the point.

Matthew_24_24

Re: "some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2004, 12:04:17 PM »
GentleTim: that is wrong. If the questions you studied allowed you to get away with that, consider yourself lucky.

Matt

Matthew_24_24

Re: "some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?
« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2004, 12:07:15 PM »
Some but not all = 1-99, not 51-99. 

How does most but not all prove 51-100? it proves the 100, not the 51. :P

Didn't anyone here take a symbolic logic course?  This is scary.  Most does not equal MAJORITY in symbolic logic. This is a logic test not a  casual language test.

Matthew

nathanielmark

Re: "some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?
« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2004, 12:10:01 PM »
for LSAT purposes, if you are asked a question that wants an answer meeting the "most but not all" criteria, any answer that equates to 51-99 would be correct.

Matthew_24_24

Re: "some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?
« Reply #15 on: August 04, 2004, 12:12:27 PM »
***Since no one listens to me i dug up my symbolic logic textbook***

Since "at least one" leaves upon the possibility of more than one (and perhaps all), we can translate any quantity that falls short of a definitive all by using the existential quantifier.  Such phrases include "many," "a few," even "most," and while their casual sense is not captured, their logical sense can be indicated.

Matt

nathanielmark

Re: "some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2004, 12:14:05 PM »
thankfully, a fundamental understanding of logic is sufficient to do well on the LSAT.  in fact, if you were to spend time working out these types of complexities on the test, you probably would not score well.


***Since no one listens to me i dug up my symbolic logic textbook***

Since "at least one" leaves upon the possibility of more than one (and perhaps all), we can translate any quantity that falls short of a definitive all by using the existential quantifier.  Such phrases include "many," "a few," even "most," and while their casual sense is not captured, their logical sense can be indicated.

Matt

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Re: "some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?
« Reply #17 on: August 04, 2004, 12:20:35 PM »
This could be helpful but i dont see what the difference is from just turning Some and Most into AT LEAST ONE.

Relax Matt, i would agree with you... the LSAT usually does not offer you a number... so apply the KISS principle and juse change anything that isnt (NOT, NONE OF, or ALL) into AT LEAST ONE.

Matthew_24_24

Re: "some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?
« Reply #18 on: August 04, 2004, 12:22:16 PM »
No, on the LSAT, if you get "most but not all" any answer that is 1-99 would be correct.  Please show me one question where this would not work. 

If most had a majority sense, then the following statement would be true:

most women are idiots  (51-100)
most women have cancer (51-100)

Therefore, some women are idiots and have cancer (2-100)

Ya, that makes sense. Not. 

Hint: if you are GUESSING about this...please stop. (PS and TM does NOT count as authoritative)

Most is an existential quantifier, nothing more, in logic. 

Matt



nathanielmark

Re: "some", "all", "most" etc....what's all that mean in LR?
« Reply #19 on: August 04, 2004, 12:24:00 PM »

if you say so... you seem to be the authority here, so...


No, on the LSAT, if you get "most but not all" any answer that is 1-99 would be correct.  Please show me one question where this would not work. 

If most had a majority sense, then the following statement would be true:

most women are idiots  (51-100)
most women have cancer (51-100)

Therefore, some women are idiots and have cancer (2-100)

Ya, that makes sense. Not. 

Hint: if you are GUESSING about this...please stop. (PS and TM does NOT count as authoritative)

Most is an existential quantifier, nothing more, in logic. 

Matt